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Author Topic: HIV from actively bleeding shaving cuts on penis uncovered area - protected sex  (Read 609 times)

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Offline tomgad

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Hi,

I had protected sex with a woman with condom.
I had shaved the hair on my penis shaft 30 mintues before sex.
The shaving created actively bleeding cuts on the base of penis shaft,
these cuts were also actively bleeding during the sex.
Druing sex, the base of penis shaft with the actively bleeding cuts
was not covered by the condom and
it was inside the vagina and had direct contact with her vaginal fluids.
I was drunk during sexual intercouse so didn't think about this during the sex.


Lets assume my actively bleeding cuts on penis base/uncovered area of penis
can provide an entry for HIV to my body.

1.  If my uncovered area on penis base with bleeding cuts has contacted
     vaginal fluids when they were inside woman's vagina druing sex.
     Is the vaginal fluid in the beginning of woman's vagina is HIV infectious
     (the area where the uncovered penis base had come in contact)?
     Can HIV infection happen to me in such case and what is the risk?

Thank you for wonderful work

Offline Jim Allen

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Hiya,

Sounds like a lot of overthinking things to me, sorry to hear you are stressing.
Anyhow I see no reason to test outside of standard yearly screening from what you posted here.

The shaving nicks/cuts are not a concern and as for the intercourse, HIV can't transmit through an intact latex or polyurethane condom. If a condom fails during the act of intercourse it's obvious to the insertive partner, there is no reason to be stressing about intercourse as long as this obvious issue did not happen.

Here's what you need to know to avoid HIV infection:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse, correctly and consistently, every time, no exceptions. Consider starting PrEP as an additional layer of HIV protection going forward

Keep in mind that some sexual practices which may be described as ‘safe’ in terms of HIV transmission might still pose a risk for transmission of other STI's, so please do get fully tested regularly and at least yearly for all STI's including but not limited to HIV and test more frequently if unprotected intercourse occurs

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms and the only way of knowing is by testing.

Kind regards

Jim

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« Last Edit: August 26, 2020, 04:41:04 pm by Jim Allen »
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Offline tomgad

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Hi Jim,

Thank you for the quick reply.

As for the vaginal fluids that that contacted the
uncovered area of penis base with bleeding cuts during protected sex.

I remeber reading in the past about HIV infection from vaginal fluids,
and  I would appreciate your professional opinion for following:

Is it correct that the only HIV infectious vaginal fluids
are the ones located deep inside the vagina near cervix,
and these HIV infectious vaginal fluids can only be accessed by penetration and
only the penis head can contact/reach these HIV infectious vaginal fluids.

The vaginal fluids in the beginning of openinig of vagina are not HIV infectious

Therefore, even if my actively bleeding cuts on penis base / uncovered area
could provide an entry for HIV,
and these cuts had direct contact with vaginal fluid,
when they were inside the beginning of opening of vagina during sex, 
since these vaginal fluids in the beginning of opening of vagina are not HIV infectious,
the risk for HIV would also be negligible in such case.

I would appreciate your referance for this.

Offline Jim Allen

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You already have had my opinion on the subject.  The cuts were not a route for HIV to infect you, so that is where your assessment ends. Move on with your life.

To answer the question although irrelevant the fluid a woman produces when sexually excited comes from the Bartholin's glands, this is a lubricating fluid and does not have any more hiv present than other bodily secretions such as saliva, sweat or tears.  Saliva, sweat and tears are not infectious fluids.

« Last Edit: August 26, 2020, 06:06:40 pm by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline tomgad

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HIV risk from frottage with menstural blood
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2020, 03:14:52 pm »
Hi,

I have had an encounter which I am concerned about and I would appreciate your professional advice.
I am aware that frottage is a no HIV risk encounter,
however recently a woman and I preformed frottage just as she began her period(menstural time).

I was not wearing a condom and I have a circumised penis.
The woman was rubbing her bare vagina on all over my penis,
including urethra and penis head and penis shaft.
Some of her menstrual blood came in contact with my urethra and my penis head.
She was above me and the urethra and penis head were pressed against her vagina,
but not penetrating her.

However, I am very concerned that because of the close proximity,
some of the blood would have still carried infectious/viable HIV,
and therefore when her blood dripped down,
it made HIV transmission possible through my exposed urethra and penis head.

I think that my urethra and penis head and her vagina formed an environment with no air at all, 
from being pressed so close together,
then this would have kept the HIV virus in her blood infectious and make HIV infection possible
through particularly my urethra and also through my penis head.

What do you think is the HIV risk from my last encounter which I have described above?


Thank you for your help and great work.

Offline Jim Allen

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Hiya

As long as you did not penetrate her its not an HIV concern. Your penis pressing against her simply does not a produce an airless (vacuum) environment allowing new fuids to run towards/in.

Stop overthinking things and trying to find new ways for HIV to transmit.

Please don't ask again about contact with fluids/rubbing etc as it's going to lead to a ban to encourage you to seek face to face support with your fears.

Use condoms for any intercourse, no exceptions and as you are sexually active test out of routine at least yearly for HIV and far easier to acquire STI's.

Best, Jim
« Last Edit: September 02, 2020, 04:26:16 pm by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline tomgad

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Hi Jim,

Thank you for the quick reply.

About your answer :

"as long as you did not penetrate her its not an HIV concern. Your penis pressing against her simply does not a produce an airless (vacuum) environment allowing new fuids to run towards/in."

I didn't penetrate the girl during frottage.

My described encounter is not HIV conceren even with the presence of
some of the woman's menstural blood that directly contacted my urethra and penis head during the frottage.

So you say that even during frottage when woman's menstural blood
and vagina are pressing against my urethra and penis head, the enviorment
is not vacuum, therefore no HIV concern even with the presence of some menstural blood from woman's vagina.


Regards

Offline Jim Allen

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Hiya,

28 day ban - I did warn not to post about this again.

Trying to find new undiscovered ways for HIV to transmit is really a waste of your time, people have tired for decades and failed to do so. Simply use condoms for any intercourse, no exceptions and as you are sexually active test out of routine at least yearly for HIV and far easier to acquire STI's.

As asked I've included a few references that you wanted so you have something to start reading from, but I'm not a library service.



Firstly understand the basic life-cycle of HIV and its needs, this is a very basic version: https://www.poz.com/basics/hiv-basics/hiv-life-cycle

Baeten J et al. Genital HIV-1 RNA Quantity Predicts Risk of Heterosexual HIV-1 Transmission. Sci Transl Med. 6; 3(77): 77ra29, 2011

Fiscus SA et al. Changes in HIV-1 subtypes B and C in genital tract RNA in women and men after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Clin Infect Dis, 57(2):290-7, 2013

Wu L Biology of HIV mucosal transmission. Curr Opin HIV AIDS 3(5): 534-540, 2008
Gupta K et al. How do viral and host factors modulate the sexual transmission of HIV? Can transmission be blocked? PLoS Med 3(2): e79, 2006
CDC

Baeten J et al. Genital HIV-1 RNA Quantity Predicts Risk of Heterosexual HIV-1 Transmission. Sci Transl Med. 6; 3(77): 77ra29, 2011

Fiscus SA et al. Changes in HIV-1 subtypes B and C in genital tract RNA in women and men after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Clin Infect Dis, 57(2):290-7, 2013
Oral transmission of HIV, reality or fiction? An update

J Campo1, MA Perea1, J del Romero2, J Cano1, V Hernando2, A Bascones1
Oral Diseases (2006) 12, 219–228

Wu L Biology of HIV mucosal transmission. Curr Opin HIV AIDS 3(5): 534-540, 2008
Gupta K et al. How do viral and host factors modulate the sexual transmission of HIV? Can transmission be blocked? PLoS Med 3(2): e79, 2006
CDC
« Last Edit: September 03, 2020, 11:49:33 am by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

 


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