Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 22, 2020, 02:45:45 am

Login with username, password and session length


Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 756178
  • Total Topics: 63920
  • Online Today: 168
  • Online Ever: 4912
  • (November 13, 2019, 02:56:14 am)
Users Online
Users: 0
Guests: 168
Total: 168

Welcome


Welcome to the POZ Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

Privacy Warning:  Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If you are HIV positive and disclose this in our forums, then it is almost the same thing as telling the whole world (or at least the World Wide Web). If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.

  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.

  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.

  • Forums members must behave at all times with respect and honesty. Posting guidelines, including time-out and banning policies, have been established by the moderators of these forums. Click here for “Do I Have HIV?” posting guidelines. Click here for posting guidelines pertaining to all other POZ community forums.

  • We ask all forums members to provide references for health/medical/scientific information they provide, when it is not a personal experience being discussed. Please provide hyperlinks with full URLs or full citations of published works not available via the Internet. Additionally, all forums members must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge.

  • Product advertisement—including links; banners; editorial content; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from POZ.

To change forums navigation language settings, click here (members only), Register now

Para cambiar sus preferencias de los foros en español, haz clic aquí (sólo miembros), Regístrate ahora

Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Author Topic: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary  (Read 1022 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Loa111

  • Member
  • Posts: 237
Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« on: January 20, 2020, 08:48:06 am »
I was watching Part 1 a documentary on HIV by Stephen Fry last Friday. He's a famous English actor and TV personality for those who don't know.

It showed one guy in it who was aged 42, he had hiv since he was 19, and was just weeks away from dying, was skinny & unwell looking (he died 3 weeks after the interview). You can see he lasted 22 years from infection and was on medications. The documentary was made in 2007, so I am wondering why the guy died? Were medicines not as advanced in 2007? Or maybe he got fed up and stopped taking them (guessing)? Or maybe in his case, he had a resistance which stopped them working (guessing)?

The manager of the hospice the guy was in, said he'd 4 other people die the same over the 2 years prior.

Suppose my point is, I thought treatment was good enough in 2006-2007 so people would not die? But maybe I am wrong?

I know things Thank God have improved dramatically since 2007 with meds etc.

I felt a bit morbid after the documentary, it didn't make me feel good. Serves me right maybe for watching a program that was made 13 years ago. I do know better!
I will not bother watching Part 2.

The documentary is on YouTube.



Offline Jim Allen

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 15,987
  • Twitter @JimAllenDublin
    • HIV Lessons
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2020, 09:57:31 am »
Aha yeah, I remember watching the documentary a few years back.

2006-2007 my gosh, so much has changed already. This chart is a nice visual I use when explaining this in person to people.

Source https://ourworldindata.org/hiv-aids

But yes, people are still dying today, even in developed nations, like that the 25-year-old Scottish lad last week. https://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=73691.0

Anyhow,  2004-5 was the peak of the number of deaths globally.

Lot's of reasons, this was before the START Study and WHO treatment guidelines changed, most combinations were different as well and plenty of people with complex medical needs or permanent damage by the time they started treatment.

It was also common enough for guidelines in some nations to even wait for the patient to have or near enough have AIDS to even qualify for considering treatment  ::) Nowadays more and more nations are adopting the "Treat all regardless of VL or CD4 counts" in line with WHO. We know better now, medication is better then it was and access to ART has increased. In 2005 just 2.0 million had access to ART and by 2018 it was 23.3 million according to the WHO.

Anyhow, just be grateful things have changed a lot.



« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 11:32:18 am by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline Loa111

  • Member
  • Posts: 237
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2020, 12:42:28 pm »
That's a good chart Jim thank you and yes I can see around 2006 on chart, thats where people lives began to be saved in higher levels, just around the time of the documentary.

Indeed, regarding the poor Scottish lad who died...could have been me too, re me being very sick with PCP during my late DX. Lucky they got me in time so treatment still could work. Obviously in his case, it didn't work due to his advanced state.

Freaked me out too, as there were a few examples in the docu of people dying who didn't really have any of the tell tale signs like weight loss skinny look etc . One guy had head aches for a few days and died in hospital. Only later they found out what cause the toxic state of this brain. That freaked me out too.

Not a good idea to go back watching old documentaries like that! Too outdated.

Offline Jim Allen

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 15,987
  • Twitter @JimAllenDublin
    • HIV Lessons
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2020, 01:16:20 pm »
It's been a few years since I watched it but I've nearly always enjoyed Stephen Fry.

Quote
Not a good idea to go back watching old documentaries like that! Too outdated.

I don't know, just take it with a pinch of salt and it's good to see documented for historical reference I suppose. If you want scary/sad just watch the news coverage from the '80s 

Just be thankful since 2006, a lot has changed, few things that stand out for me since then would be the below, there are so many more changes and developments of course.

* 2005 just 2.0 million had access to ART
* 2006 The SMART study (For those who remember, staying on ART was better than interrupting it)
* 2008 The Swiss statement
https://www.poz.com/article/i-POZ-i-Founder-Sean-Strub-Responds-to-Swiss-Statement-on-Condomless-Sex-14318-3425#search-query=swiss%20statement
* 2008 Timothy Ray Brown
https://www.contagionlive.com/news/dont-call-me-the-berlin-patient-call-me-timothy-ray-brown
* 2009 US Lifts ban on PLHIV entering (At least I think it was 2009)
* 2011 - 2015 The START study and updated WHO treatment guidelines
https://www.aidsmap.com/news/may-2015/start-trial-finds-early-treatment-improves-outcomes-people-hiv
* 2011 - 2018 Number of key studies regarding TaSP
* 2016 Prevention Access Campaign campaign Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U)
* 2018 Just 23.3 million have access to ART   :(
* 13-14 years of medication developments including new classes of meds.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 01:22:25 pm by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline leatherman

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,790
  • Google and HIV meds are Your Friends
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2020, 08:08:01 am »
I thought treatment was good enough in 2006-2007 so people would not die? But maybe I am wrong?
treatment was getting great during those years. you're not taking into account stigma, late diagnosis, those who had been on various meds with bad side effects or who had developed resistance, substance abuse, mental health issues, non-adherence, early survivors who had aged, or those who had been saved by the earliest meds yet still never fully recovered.

I know things Thank God have improved dramatically since 2007 with meds etc.
actually meds have been improving since 1987 and AZT. Every few years meds have gotten better. Many of us who have lived with HIV for 30 or 40 years have often switched meds. Sometimes because of side effects, and sometimes simply because the newer meds had greater efficiency and/or fewer side effects.

Serves me right maybe for watching a program that was made 13 years ago. I do know better
go ahead and watch this kind of show - but take it for the historical* record that it is and not as a reference to modern treatment or even as current accurate data.

(* "historical". boy that makes me feel old. ;D while for some people this documentary is about what happened long ago, for some of us this was simply our lives in our 30s and 40s.)
leatherman (aka mIkIE)

Offline leatherman

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,790
  • Google and HIV meds are Your Friends
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2020, 08:18:15 am »
Unfortunately my first partner :'( died in 1994 in the blue section just before the pink link started;
while my second partner :'( died way over there in the blue section in 2008



However, that's me :D in the tiniest sliver at the start of that pink line having death averted by liquid norvir and ddI;
and then there's me :D again just above that 1-million line having death averted by Sustiva.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)

Offline harleymc

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,411
Re: Stephen Fry HIV Documentary
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2020, 07:08:54 am »
I had a dramatic treatment failure end of 2006 / beginning of 2007.
I had no treatment options left for medications licensed in Australia. I had a ding ding row with my doctor about this.  She thought I wasn't 'compliant' I pointed out I'd never had a combination of three new medications.
But if we look at the 18 years of treatment that lead to that failure I'd been on what we're effectively a series of monotherapies. 

I started with AZT,  then a year or so later when that was clearly failing we added in DDI, some time later ddc. Even when the buzz started about protease inhibitors and combination ART, I'd gone into saquinavir 6 months before ritonovir.


This is not to say I had incompetent doctors. It was an era of no cd4 counts, no resistance testing and very limited range of drugs.


I didn't find it too surprising that, as good as I was at taking pills that treatment failed. Fortunately we had resistance testing by then and my dr got a special licence to import a new class of drug on compassionate basis.

Yes there were old-timers like me still dieing back then. But it was absolutely. Nothing like the late eighties and first half of the nineties.

 


Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2020 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.