Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 20, 2019, 07:53:42 am

Login with username, password and session length

Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 746136
  • Total Topics: 62419
  • Online Today: 282
  • Online Ever: 1421
  • (August 13, 2016, 05:18:44 am)
Users Online
Users: 1
Guests: 254
Total: 255

Author Topic: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?  (Read 168 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline solzh

  • Standard
  • Member
  • Posts: 4
Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« on: July 13, 2019, 09:15:24 pm »
When opening or putting a condom, can you or your partner create a micro tear on the condom with the fingernails or teeth?

Or does any damage to the condom cause it to break in a very noticeable way?

Offline Jim Allen

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 12,509
  • Twitter @JimAllenDublin
    • HIV Lessons
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2019, 09:27:14 pm »
First, it's micro-cuts and, now its micro-tear worries.  Did something happen or just a general question?

Look condoms & micro-tears, mega myths!. Keep this in mind, condoms shred when they fail during the act of intercourse, now as long as that obvious issue does not happen then, relax & move on with your life.

Remeber keep using condoms for any intercourse, consider talking PrEP as an additional layer of HIV prevention and, like any sexually active adult test at least yearly for HIV & far easier to acquire STI's
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 10:01:35 pm by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Transmission and Risks:
HIV Transmission and Risks
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline solzh

  • Standard
  • Member
  • Posts: 4
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2019, 09:23:14 am »
Just a general question. Thanks for the quick response.

There's a lot of websites with articles about condoms not being that effective. It's hard to know when it's good info or just urban myths.

Offline Jim Allen

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 12,509
  • Twitter @JimAllenDublin
    • HIV Lessons
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2019, 10:06:40 am »
Condoms are perfectly effective at preventing HIV transmission during intercourse, as in HIV can not transmit through an intact condom - End of story.

One of the problems is that condoms can break in the real world mostly due to incorrect usage and if they do break during intercourse the effectiveness is gone. Hence statistically condoms are less than 100%.  The other issues are things like the old story of inconsistent usage.

Back to the point, stats without content simply do not apply to individuals (you).

What applies to you is simply the following; HIV can not transmit through an intact condom during the act of intercourse and, as long as this obvious issue of condoms shredding does not happen there is no reason to worry about HIV from intercourse, leaving no reason to stress or test outside of normal standard routine.

One of the bigger problems is STI's & HIV often get grouped incorrectly together when looking at effectiveness causing undue panic by many sources. See the levels of protection for various STIs also depends greatly on differences in how the diseases or infections are transmitted.  Some infections (Not HIV) are transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact, which may infect areas not covered by a condom ( Such as genital herpes, human papillomavirus [HPV] infection, syphilis, and chancroid). So effectiveness also depends on what STI you are concerned about.

Hence it's also one of the reasons its safer sex not safe sex and, everyone sexual active should simply test at least yearly for STI's out of standard routine.

Jim

Example:

15 years of follow-up over a dozen studies into modern condoms.
HIV/AIDS: European Research provides clear proof that HIV virus cannot pass through condoms

http://ec.europa.eu/research/press/2003/pr2010-hiv-en.html
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 10:42:37 am by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Transmission and Risks:
HIV Transmission and Risks
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline fabio

  • Member
  • Posts: 269
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2019, 10:42:12 am »
Mega tip: Do not open condoms with your teeth. There is am edge that is made to open the condom normally.

Offline Jim Allen

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 12,509
  • Twitter @JimAllenDublin
    • HIV Lessons
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2019, 10:59:49 am »
Yup.

But I think tips like this if read out of context can mistakenly reinforce myths at times, so if we point our incorrect usage that can weaken condoms, I think we need to give context & keep in mind for posters that the condoms in use are being subjected to stress.

So thankfully due to the design & characteristics, when condoms fail during use they tend to completely fail under stress so not microscopically tin-hat paranoid time, but catastrophically oh shit moments.

The short version is incorrect usage simply increases the odds of a condom breaking but as long as the obvious issue does not happen then there is no issue for people to panic about in terms of HIV as HIV simply can not transmit through the intact latex or polyurethane barrier.

Some core basics on condom usage includes making sure that whatever the type of condom being used, you only use approved condoms, the unapproved condoms can possibly fail easier, In other words, check for a certification mark (FDA, CE, ISO or Kitemark etc.). This means it complies with safety standards. Check the expiry date and make sure the condom is still in date.

When using condoms use lubricant, particularly with anal intercourse and use condom safe water-based lubricants this makes condoms more comfortable and also reduces the risk of breakage. – but avoid oil-based lubricants as they can weaken or break condoms.

As for putting a condom on correctly, if incorrectly done it increases the risk of breakage.  Place one on top of the erect penis and pinch the teat at the end of the condom before you start to roll it down the penis. By doing this you’ll squeeze out any air bubbles and ensure there is room for the semen (cum). Roll the condom down to the base of the penis.

If it's on correctly it will roll downwards easily. If you've started putting it on the wrong way or you’re not sure then take it off and try again. Even if you have not ejaculated (cum) there can still be semen (pre-cum), so it’s important to try again with a new condom. (This is mainly due to other easier to transmit STI's and if with cis-woman pregnancy risks)

Finally, if you are changing the sex act, then change the condom. 

Also remember that although HIV can not transmit thought an intact condom, the levels of protection for various STIs depends greatly on differences in how the diseases or infections are transmitted.  Some infections (Not HIV) are transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact, which unlike HIV may infect areas not covered by a condom ( Such as genital herpes, human papillomavirus [HPV] infection, syphilis, and chancroid).[/b]

Hence one more reason to test at least yearly out of routine for STI's and, the standard advice below:

Here's what you need to know in order to avoid hiv infection:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse, correctly and consistently, every time, no exceptions. Consider starting PrEP in the future as an additional layer of protection against HIV

Keep in mind that some sexual practices which may be described as ‘safe’ in terms of HIV transmission might still pose a risk for transmission of other STI's, so please do get fully tested regularly and at least yearly for all STI's including but not limited to HIV and test more frequently if unprotected intercourse occurs

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms and the only way of knowing is by testing.

Jim
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 03:13:18 pm by Jim Allen »
HIV 101 - Everything you need to know
HIV 101
Transmission and Risks:
HIV Transmission and Risks
Read more about Testing here:
HIV Testing
Read about Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP) here:
HIV TasP
You can read about HIV prevention here:
HIV prevention
Read about PEP and PrEP here
PEP and PrEP

Offline fabio

  • Member
  • Posts: 269
Re: Can condoms be damaged without being noticeable?
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2019, 03:10:11 pm »
Yeah,I guess that would be the  best explanation 😅

 


Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2019 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.