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Author Topic: HIV Is Linked to Advanced Aging  (Read 602 times)

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Offline Jim Allen

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HIV Is Linked to Advanced Aging
« on: January 17, 2019, 12:40:09 pm »
Overall not too bad actually, although I must admit if i was taking saquinavir (Invirase or Fortovase) i probably would be considering switching.

Jim

Quote
Conclusion: Both treated PLWH and lifestyle-comparable HIV-negative individuals show signs of age advancement compared with blood donors, to which persistent CMV, HBV co-infection and CD8+ T-cell activation may have contributed. Age advancement remained greatest in PLWH and was related to prior immunodeficiency and cumulative saquinavir exposure.


Poz.com
https://www.poz.com/article/even-treated-hiv-linked-advanced-aging

Quote
People living with well-treated HIV may experience faster biological aging than their HIV-negative counterparts.

Publishing their findings in the journal AIDS, researchers from the ComorBidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) study analyzed 134 people with HIV and 79 HIV-negative people with similar sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. The participants were recruited in Amsterdam (these were at least 45 years old) and London (these were at least 50 years old).

All the HIV-positive individuals were on antiretrovirals and had had a fully suppressed viral load for at least 12 months.

The researchers also studied samples from 35 blood donors selected from the Dutch national blood bank in Amsterdam. They were matched with the HIV-positive and -negative individuals from the COBRA study according to age and had all tested negative for HIV, hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV), syphilis and human T-lymphotropic virus 1 and 2 (HTLV).

The investigators tested the participants for 10 biomarkers that previous research has indicated are associated with biological, as opposed to chronological, aging.

Among the COBRA study members, biological age was greater than chronological age by an average of 13.2 years among those with HIV and 5.5 years among those without the virus. For the blood donors, biological age was an average of 7.0 years lower than chronological age.

After adjusting the data for various factors, including HIV status, the study authors found that the following factors were significantly associated with a greater average biological age compared with chronological age: chronic HBV, 10.05 years; total anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibody levels, 1.83 years per 10-fold increase; and CD8 cell count, 0.44 years per 100-cell increase.

After adjusting for chronic HBV infection status, total anti-CMV IgG antibody levels and CD8 levels, the analysis indicated that the HIV-positive COBRA participants had a greater discrepancy between biological and chronological age compared with their HIV-negative counterparts (4.5 years on average) and with the blood donors (19.0 years on average).

After conducting another analysis in which they adjusted the data for various factors, the study authors found that HIV-related factors associated with a greater biological age compared with chronological age included: cumulative exposure to the antiretroviral Invirase (saquinavir), 1.17 years per year of exposure; a lowest-ever (nadir) CD4 count of less than 300, 3.0 years; chronic HBV, 7.35 years; and total anti-CMV IgG antibody level, 1.86 years per 10-fold increase.
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Offline geobee

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Re: HIV Is Linked to Advanced Aging
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 11:20:45 pm »
I've been UD for 10 years, my CD3 and CD8 are still about double the "high" range (as quoted by Kaiser.)  I never understood why - I mean, the drugs are working, right?  But the doc says as it's "immune activation" related to HIV.  I just try to live as healthy a life as possible, the rest I can do nothing about.

 


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