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Main Forums => Living With HIV => Topic started by: lightalltheway on January 22, 2020, 10:14:43 am

Title: An inquiry, please.
Post by: lightalltheway on January 22, 2020, 10:14:43 am
Hello all,

Long story short, due to unforeseen circumstances; I will have to postpone my semi-annual check up/ Dr. appointment/ blood works for three months. Does anybody have experience with postponing their medical check-ups? any insights about that will be highly valued.

A side note, I am healthy, UD, and feeling well apart of the normal daily stress.

Thank you in advance.

Title: Re: An inquiry, please.
Post by: leatherman on January 22, 2020, 11:33:43 am
The only issue could be if postponing a visit for those months would interrupt how your health care is paid. if you're an American and receive assistance from the Ryan White program, your delayed visit will screw up their medical visit frequency and medical visit gap measures slightly  :D but that's all.

If you're UD and doing well, with no other issues that you should present to your doctor, then postponing a medical visit won't do anything (it's not like physically visiting your doctor makes you healthier. LOL) .... except save you a little money on transportation and physician visit costs. Just stay adherent to your meds and live you life... and enjoy the medical break.
Title: Re: An inquiry, please.
Post by: lightalltheway on January 22, 2020, 01:21:37 pm
The only issue could be if postponing a visit for those months would interrupt how your health care is paid. if you're an American and receive assistance from the Ryan White program, your delayed visit will screw up their medical visit frequency and medical visit gap measures slightly  :D but that's all.

If you're UD and doing well, with no other issues that you should present to your doctor, then postponing a medical visit won't do anything (it's not like physically visiting your doctor makes you healthier. LOL) .... except save you a little money on transportation and physician visit costs. Just stay adherent to your meds and live you life... and enjoy the medical break.

HAHA .. You made me really laugh, I wish that by physically visiting the doctor would have made us ALL healthier. If you really think about it, in that case nobody would be sick and clinics will shut down. LOL!

Thank you for your reply, though. It makes absolute sense. And the reason for the gap is a programme that am participating in and I need to be 'physically' presented somewhere else.

Title: Re: An inquiry, please.
Post by: leatherman on January 22, 2020, 08:38:26 pm
Thank you for your reply, though. It makes absolute sense. And the reason for the gap is a programme that am participating in
while HIV is a serious disease there are no set times that a patient must absolutely see a physician for the treatment to continue to work. Theoretically, there's no "need" to have blood work done. Leaving vials of blood with the vampires doesn't make your healthier and doesn't interfere with HIV treatment . But of course having that lab work done periodically helps you and your doctor to know that your treatment is still working and could find early predictors of other problems. If your blood work has been good previously, you have been adherent to meds, and don't have other issues, then, especially if money or transportation is a factor, there is no specific need to see a physician at any specific time.

The Ryan White program funds, to some extent, probably every HIV clinic in the USA (by making sure low-income persons receive care). This program also has set measurements that are monitored to ensure that patients receive quality healthcare (that would be health care that is effective in treating patients). Some measurements are what % of patients needing PCP prophylaxis are prescribed medication, what % of patients have been screened for possible STI co-infections like syphilis, gonorrhea, etc, and what % of patients are virally suppressed, how many times a patient has medical visits.

Studies have shown that a certain amount of doctor/medical visits (1 every 6 months, with at least 60 days between visits, over a 2 year period is the Medical Visit Frequency measure.) seems to work best at ensuring that the most patients remain adherent and finding any other developing issues. There's another measure, the Medical Visit Gap, looks at how many patients don't have a medical visit in that timeframe. Local area Ryan White quality management committees look at those numbers sent in from area clinics/doctors and discuss ways to improve those numbers by helping clinics improve their care of patients.

the upside to all of this is that clinics receiving Ryan White funding will generally change overall policies to meet the measurements which means non-Ryan White patients (insurance, self pay) will also receive quality health care. It's also a big win for Ryan White patients because funding is provided to help those patients have access to prescriptions and the "required" amount of medical visits in a year.

As I was typing this up I realized that in the past decade in my Ryan White area, I have screwed up their medical visit frequency number (I skipped a couple of appointments through the years), which also screwed up their medical visit gap number. Once I really screwed up  ;D the Virally Suppressed number when I had a blip that went up from UD to 2500 to 59000, so for 4 months I was part of the NON virally suppressed patients and a "problem". LOL
Title: Re: An inquiry, please.
Post by: MadDog125 on January 23, 2020, 09:25:52 am
I'm only two years in.  Postponed by a month once, doc approved the drug refill but wanted me to go In for blood work as soon as possible.  I can't speak for a longer hiatus than that.  I was still on a 3 month protocol at the time.