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Mensajes recientes

Páginas: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Do I Have HIV? / Re: Panic! Half of condom stayed in me after he pulled out
« Último mensaje por Jim Allen en Ayer a las 11:52:29 pm »
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asked his STD and HIV status, and he said he was clean.

Glad to hear he washed. I'm also 100% clean, just washed. My HIV status doesn't make me unclean.

Anyhow, nothing he says or claims means anything.

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his STD

Regarding other STIs, this is an HIV forum, but even if condoms are used consistently & correctly you still would be at risk for STIs.

In short, most STIs are far more infectious than HIV and the levels of protection condoms offer for various STIs depend significantly on differences in how the diseases or infections are transmitted. Some infections (Not HIV) are transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact, viral shredding or skin-to-lesion contact, etc., which may infect areas not covered by a condom, such as genital herpes, human papillomavirus [HPV], Chancroid (Haemophilus ducreyi) etc.

It's safer sex, not safe. No need to panic though every time you have sex, just keep using condoms and get a routine STI screening yearly. Talk to your doctor about vaccinations against HPV, hepatitis A and hepatitis B.

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tragedy occurred that after he withdrew from me, we noticed the condom was not on his penis, but half inside my vagina and half hung outside.

He didn't hold onto the base of the condom whilst pulling out, that's the mistake.
Anyhow, I see no HIV risk from what you posted here.

Relax and move on with your life.

Here's what you need to know to reduce your HIV risks:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse correctly and consistently, with no exceptions. Consider talking to your healthcare provider about PrEP as an additional layer of protection against HIV

Keep in mind that some sexual practices described as safe in terms of acquiring HIV still pose a risk for other easier-acquired STIs. So please do get tested at least yearly for STIs, including but not limited to HIV, and more frequently if condomless intercourse occurs.

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms; testing is the only way to know.

Kind regards

Jim

Please Note.
As a member of the "Do I have HIV" Forum, you are required to only post in this one thread no matter how long between visits or the subject matter. You can find this thread by going to your profile and selecting show own post, which will take you here. It helps us to help you when you keep all your thoughts or questions in one thread, and it helps other readers to follow the discussion. Any additional threads will be removed
2
Do I Have HIV? / Panic! Half of condom stayed in me after he pulled out
« Último mensaje por Flatfootrunner en Ayer a las 10:57:45 pm »
two weeks ago, i (female) had sex with a new partner. He was not allowed to touch me without a condom, so The whole time was protected by the condom. However, tragedy occurred that after he withdrew from me, we noticed the condom was not on his penis, but half inside my vagina and half hung outside. He did not cum thought coz he couldn’t. i got freaked out and  asked his STD and HIV status, and he said he was clean. Even he is a doctor, i just cannot trust him due to my anxiety nature. So what is my risk? If i want to get a test, how many weeks should I wait? Thank you!
3
wonder if I was a part of this data set? :)

it must be somewhat reassuring that this study suggests it also helps reduce dementia risk next to controlling blood pressure.
Woohoo! Gotta love that Lisinopril. My BP is good AND I haven't lost my mind....yet. LOL

4
Research News & Studies / DHHS updated guidelines - statins for PLHIV
« Último mensaje por Jim Allen en Ayer a las 04:06:24 pm »

By Liz Highleyman - POZ.com article in full: https://www.poz.com/article/us-hiv-guidelines-recommend-statins-prevent-cardiovascular-disease

In brief:
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The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has updated its antiretroviral treatment guidelines to recommend statins for people living with HIV who are ages 40 to 75 and have a low to intermediate risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

As people with HIV live longer thanks to effective antiretroviral treatment, cardiovascular disease has become a leading cause of illness and death. Studies show that HIV-positive people have about a twofold higher risk for CVD than their HIV-negative peers. What’s more, people with HIV experience cardiovascular complications at younger ages. In part, this may be due to chronic inflammation that persists even in people on effective HIV treatment.

The new DHHS guidelines were developed in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the HIV Medicine Association.

  • For people with HIV ages 40 to 75 who have high (20% or greater) 10-year ASCVD risk scores, the guidelines recommend starting high-intensity statin therapy—the same as the recommendation for HIV-negative people.
  • For HIV-positive people ages 40 to 75 with low to intermediate (5% to just under 20%) 10-year risk scores, the guidelines recommend starting at least moderate-intensity statin therapy, for example 4 milligrams once-daily pitavastatin, 20 mg once-daily atorvastatin (Lipitor) or 10 mg once-daily rosuvastatin (Crestor).
  • For those in this age group with 10-year risk estimates below 5%, the guidelines still favor initiating at least moderate-intensity statin therapy. However, the authors acknowledge that the absolute benefit from statins is modest for this population, so decision-making should take into account HIV-related factors that can increase CVD risk.
  • For people with HIV under age 40, there is not enough data to recommend either for or against statin therapy for primary CVD prevention. For HIV-negative people of this age, lifestyle modification is recommended, with statin therapy considered only for specific groups at higher risk.
  • For the general population, people ages 20 to 75 with elevated LDL levels (190 or higher) are advised to start high-intensity statin therapy, and those ages 40 to 75 with diabetes are advised to start at least moderate-intensity statin therapy. These recommendations should also apply to people with HIV.
  • For people over 75, the guidelines do not offer a recommendation, as there are inadequate study data for this age group
5
It's simple, test at six weeks and in the meantime focus on your normal life. No drama is required and it wasn't a "High Risk" as you put it, that's just being dramatic, it was just risk.

Next time use condoms and perhaps drink less.
6
Thank you for replying. I understand your point about the risk and I was simply trying to get an indicator of the likelihood of my test being accurate or false at this point. I know it was a risk and tried to get pep within 72 hours but in the country I am in, they require proof that someone is definetly infected. I was drunk and made a mistake, partly influenced by her word and I am in a hole now. I know none of this matters now and that´s why I am in nothing but a zone of despair.
7
I can't take ACE inhibitors due to an ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

However, for those on an ACE inhibitor, although further research is needed, it must be somewhat reassuring that this study suggests it also helps reduce dementia risk next to controlling blood pressure.
8
Do I Have HIV? / Re: Repeated low-positive / equivocal results
« Último mensaje por Jim Allen en Ayer a las 08:55:35 am »
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I don’t know much about the oral health of this guy, but he does have a tongue piercing. I didn’t notice any blood during any of the blowjobs - would it need to be super obvious and pissing out of his mouth for it to be a risk?

So if he needed urgent medical care, like you beat him to a pulp or stabbed him in the face and instead of calling him an ambulance you put your penis in the knife wound that theoretically might do it but HIV would also be the least of your concerns.

As Micheal explained it's not an HIV risk.

Despite that some blood presence is pretty common in the month, receiving a blowjob lacks the conditions required for acquiring HIV; thus, it makes sense that after 40+ years of this pandemic in terms of BJs, there hasn't been a single documented case of HIV transmission to an insertive partner (the person being "sucked"), and you will not be the worlds first.

So stop asking or bringing up, consider the topic of getting a blowjob closed.

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I know the guy who I had protected anal with back in October quite well, so I spoke to him about it and he has tested negative and sent me the screenshot from the testing service.

It's irrelevant as there was no HIV risk and screenshots of stuff mean nothing.
This has been addressed by Micheal, so consider the topic closed.

Hi all,

I’m looking for some advice (and hopefully reasurrance!)

I’m a gay man who has always used condoms for anal sex but never for oral sex.

In 2020 I had a routine screening in a clinic in the uk and it came back indeterminate (they said it was a ‘low positive’ on the first 4th gen and then negative on the second 4th gen using the same sample.

I had to wait for 2 weeks and go back again where they did the more detailed tests, which came back negative. I was obviously quite nervous at the time. They did warn me that it might happen again as some people for unknown reasons get these kind of results. They also told me not to do the postal tests as these may come up reactive and I would be referred to the clinic anyway.

I then had another routine screening in 2021 at the same clinic and this came out negative.

I became a blood donor in 2021 when they relaxed the rules for MSM and have donated a few times, most recently in august 2023. All donations were used and sent to hospitals. During this period I wasn’t really sexually active apart from some insertive oral. So I’m confident that my status was negative as recently as august 2023.

Since the august 2023 blood donation I’ve had anal sex once (in October), where I was the top and used a condom. I’ve done insertive oral a few times too, as recently as Jan 2024 with the same person.

In January 2024 I did a postal test (mainly for the other tests as I hadn’t done these for a while) but it came with a finger prick for hiv and syph too). A week or so later they came back to me to say everything was negative except the HIV which was a low-reactive - apparently anything over 1.0 is reactive, mine was 2.56 and they class anything over 30.00 as a high reactive.

They referred me to my local clinic (different to my previous clinic as I’ve moved house) where I had the more detailed tests. 2 weeks later I got the results which they said was ‘insufficient’ due to the clinic only sending them enough blood to do the 2 antibody tests but not the confirmatory tests. Apparently the antibody tests came back as equivocal (first one reactive and second one non-reactive).

Part of me isn’t too worried and I consider my behaviour to be fairly low-risk, and also given that the same thing happened before. Obviously though it’s in the back of my mind. I’ve had to come away for business for a couple of weeks so won’t be able to go back for the retests for a little while. It’s also frustrating that the clinic messed up with the size of the samples.

I do have various allergies and also psoriasis which I’ve had for years. Whilst these are classed as immune disorders, I don’t think they are known to cause these false positives. I did also have covid in December (confirmed with lateral flow) and the clinic said it could be that. I’ve not had any noticeable seroconversion symptoms.

What are my risks here? Anyone else experienced similar? 



So a few years back, you took a screening test had a false reactive result.

Its just a seening test, not a dignosis, and we see reactive results commenly engough, no drama needed. False reactive results can happen due to cross antibodies reaction, other past infection, solution/buffer interacteration depending on the test etc.

A reactive result simply means further testing is needed to exclude an HIV infection and, the clinc also informed you this could happen again and not to take the tests by post.

2020:
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They also told me not to do the postal tests as these may come up reactive and I would be referred to the clinic anyway.

2024:
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In January 2024 I did a postal test

Don't do postal tests for HIV, yet you did and it's reactive. Now it simply means further testing is needed to exclude an HIV infection.

Stop messing about with home test kits, rapid tests or postal tests. Next time just go to the clinic and what you posted here about the sex wasn't an HIV risk, as Micheal has already mentioned.

I wish you well but please don't post about this again. Thank you.

Anyone who continues to post excessively, questioning a conclusive negative result or no-risk situation, will be subject to a four week Time Out (a temporary ban from the Forums). If you continue to post excessively after one Time Out, you may be given a second Time Out which will last eight weeks. There is no third Time Out - it is a permanent ban. The purpose of a Time Out is to encourage you to seek the face-to-face help we cannot provide on this forum.


9
Do I Have HIV? / Re: Repeated low-positive / equivocal results
« Último mensaje por leicestershireboy en Ayer a las 08:34:46 am »
Thanks for coming back to me :)

Quick update, I went back to the clinic a week ago for the follow up tests so should have the results soon.

I know the guy who I had protected anal with back in October quite well, so I spoke to him about it and he has tested negative and sent me the screenshot from the testing service.

So that leaves one other guy I’ve had any sort of sexual contact with - he’s given me a few unprotected blowjobs between November and January but that’s it. I didn’t suck him and we didn’t do any anal or anything else.

Whilst waiting for my results from the clinic I’ve also done 3 home testing kits (one was an oral swab and the other two were single blood drops) and these were all negative which is somewhat reassuring.

This is reassuring but I’ve got in the back of my mind that these have longer window periods and I somehow could have become infected by the insertive oral with the other guy more recently. Looking at various topics on here I can see insertive oral isn’t classed as any risk at all, however other sources say it’s a theoretical risk if there is blood involved. I don’t know much about the oral health of this guy, but he does have a tongue piercing. I didn’t notice any blood during any of the blowjobs - would it need to be super obvious and pissing out of his mouth for it to be a risk?

Sorry for being one of those people asking these questions. I wouldn’t be concerned about it at all if I hadn’t had these reactive results. Although it is worth noting I had a false reactive a few years ago and they did warn me that it could happen again in future. Doesn’t stop it worrying me though.

To confirm these are the tests I’ve had results of so far:

Home sampling kit taken early Jan and tested in lab - low reactive elisa
Clinic test taken 19th Jan - first elisa reactive (they don’t give a figure) and second elisa non-reactive

Home testing kits taken on 21st feb - oral swab negative, 3rd gen blood drop negative, 2nd gen blood drop negative.

Even though the window period on the home test kits is longer, I’m assuming that if my January tests were genuine positives, even these would have picked something up a whole month later?

I know there isn’t a lot I can do about it now until I get the extra clinic test results, but just wondering if this extra info changes anything.

As I said, I do suffer from psoriasis which is classed as an auto immune disease, although it’s not listed anywhere as causing false reactives. I did also have covid in December, which the clinic initially said may have caused a cross-reaction on the first one.

Thanks and take care 
10
Hiya,

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I know a lot of the information

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She informed me a month after the encounter that she is positive.

You chose to have condomless intercourse with this woman, knowing that condomless intercourse is an HIV risk. Then a month later she tested positive and was kind and polite enough to inform you.

Is this correct?

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I asked for PEP but this was denied to me because I could not prove to the hospital that she was infected.

Good, taking PEP a month after exposure is pointless.

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I had mild throat irritation 5 days after the exposure and it has come and gone, but I have generally had globus.

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I am currently experiencing a severe backache and sometimes a headache

Nothing to do with HIV from the concerned encounter. See your healthcare provider and treat this and I hope you feel better soon. (Don't ask again about symptoms)

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I have been told I need to do more tests

Test to confirm your HIV status at six weeks post-exposure with a blood-draw (lab) HIV antibody test. The result at this time will rarely change, and retesting at three months is generally not needed.


Here's what you need to know to reduce your HIV risks:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse correctly and consistently, with no exceptions. Consider talking to your healthcare provider about PrEP as an additional layer of protection against HIV

Keep in mind that some sexual practices described as safe in terms of acquiring HIV still pose a risk for other easier-acquired STIs. So please do get tested at least yearly for STIs, including but not limited to HIV, and more frequently if condomless intercourse occurs.

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms; testing is the only way to know.

Kind regards

Jim

Please Note.
As a member of the "Do I have HIV" Forum, you are required to only post in this one thread no matter how long between visits or the subject matter. You can find this thread by going to your profile and selecting show own post, which will take you here. It helps us to help you when you keep all your thoughts or questions in one thread, and it helps other readers to follow the discussion. Any additional threads will be removed
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