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Welcome to the POZ Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

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Recent Posts

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31
Estoy infectado? / preocupado
« Last post by Luiskokusho on May 13, 2024, 03:11:32 pm »
Comparto mi situación

hace 4 días tuve relaciones con una sexoservidora. la cual me hizo oral con condon y también la penetracion  fue con condon. para esto yo estaba algo tomado. pero recuerdo todo.  al momento de retirarme vi que el condon estaba allí y después de esto fui a verlo si no se había roto. el cual no está roto. después me entró dudas como si se hubiera movido . pero creo que son más mis miedos por mi mala acción. debería estar preocupado ?
32
Hiya.

I read your post three times with care.

Nobody has acquired HIV through fingering, and you will not be the world's first, fingering lacks a route for you to acquire HIV and your sore, scraped and poorly maintained finger doesn't change that.

Move on with your life & please don't post about this again! Thank you.



Here's what you need to know to reduce your HIV risks:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse correctly and consistently, with no exceptions. Consider talking to your healthcare provider about PrEP as an additional layer of protection against HIV and get vaccinated against HPV, Hepatitis A & B.

Keep in mind that some sexual practices described as safe in terms of acquiring HIV still pose a risk for other easier-acquired STIs. So please do get tested at least yearly for STIs, including but not limited to HIV, and more frequently if condomless intercourse occurs.

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms; testing is the only way to know.

Kind regards

Jim

Please Note.
As a member of the "Do I have HIV" Forum, you are required to only post in this one thread no matter how long between visits or the subject matter. You can find this thread by going to your profile and selecting show own post, which will take you here. It helps us to help you when you keep all your thoughts or questions in one thread, and it helps other readers to follow the discussion. Any additional threads will be removed.
 






33
Do I Have HIV? / Re: Exposure Question
« Last post by Jim Allen on May 13, 2024, 01:13:20 pm »
Quote
am I just completely being anxious over nothing?

Yes.

Receiving a blowjob lacks the conditions required for acquiring HIV; thus, it makes sense that after 40+ years of this pandemic in terms of BJs, there hasn't been a single documented case of HIV transmission to an insertive partner (the person being "sucked"), and you will not be the worlds first.

Kissing and fingering also isn't an HIV risk.  Regarding intercourse, HIV can't be transmitted through an intact latex, polyisoprene or polyurethane condom. Unless a condom obviously fails during intercourse, there is no reason to be stressing about HIV or testing for HIV outside the standard yearly HIV screening.

In short: You had no HIV risk from the concerned encounter, move on with your life.

Here's what you need to know to reduce your HIV risks:
Use condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse correctly and consistently, with no exceptions. Consider talking to your healthcare provider about PrEP as an additional layer of protection against HIV and get vaccinated against HPV, Hepatitis A & B.

Keep in mind that some sexual practices described as safe in terms of acquiring HIV still pose a risk for other easier-acquired STIs. So please do get tested at least yearly for STIs, including but not limited to HIV, and more frequently if condomless intercourse occurs.

Also, note that it is possible to have an STI and show no signs or symptoms; testing is the only way to know.

Kind regards

Jim

Please Note.
As a member of the "Do I have HIV" Forum, you are required to only post in this one thread no matter how long between visits or the subject matter. You can find this thread by going to your profile and selecting show own post, which will take you here. It helps us to help you when you keep all your thoughts or questions in one thread, and it helps other readers to follow the discussion. Any additional threads will be removed.
 
34
Do I Have HIV? / Fingering multiple CSW with a cut and sore in the fingers
« Last post by Ahm08 on May 13, 2024, 01:11:11 pm »
Hi. First i want to thank you of what you and this forum done to people who was or were worrying about a exposure.
I fingered way too much womens deep inside the vagina. Some of the exposure i had a cut in my finger probably flesh cut after clipping my nails. It bled and even after fingering the next day my finger stings and when i applied pressure small blood came out. Now my fingers are not in good condition. I really dont take care of my fingers. I bite the skin near the nails. There is a gapping space between the side of my nails and fingers. There is alot of scrapes underneath my fingernails.
Every time i finger a CSW i get stinging pain in my fingers but no blood.
- what is the risk of fingering multiple womens probably around 20.
- i read air inactivates the HIV, but i fingered her deep inside till the cervix and rubbed the area without taking my finger out. So there is no air. With a fresh cut under my nails. Im afraid while my finger was inside and i let it there for awhile, the virus mite have entered throught that cut.
- as i said my finger are not in good condition and i still finger them. From all the websites i read fingering is a low risk if you have a fresh cut.
- is there target cell in the fingers where hiv attach to it like in the penis or the vagina and anus.
35
Estoy infectado? / Re: san2023
« Last post by Jim Allen on May 13, 2024, 01:09:59 pm »
Cualquier los detalles recibiendo el sexo oral es sin riesgo por el VIH, carece de las condiciones necesarias para que el VIH.

Adelante con su vida.


36
Estoy infectado? / Re: san2023
« Last post by san2023 on May 13, 2024, 01:07:26 pm »
Hola buenas ….tenido relacion sexo oral con mujer recibido sexo oral
No dado cuenta ella tiene algo in boca tipo grano
So tengo que hacer prueba gracia
37
Do I Have HIV? / Exposure Question
« Last post by Any1122 on May 13, 2024, 12:57:10 pm »
Hello, perhaps I am overthinking this and it’s from a lack of knowledge. But question about possible exposure revolves around some incidents of my doing. About 60 hours ago I engaged in some activities with a female sex worker. We did kiss, then She gave me unprotected oral sex, I fingered her, and then had intercourse with her whilst wearing a condom that I put on myself. I did have some alcohol in my system, and I am pretty positive the condom did not fail (maybe I could’ve missed something? Idk) but it definitely was on the majority of my genitalia. Her status is unknown to me. Would it be smart to take PEP or am I just completely being anxious over nothing?
38
Previous related topics.
 
HIV Treatment Mitigates Risk of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease
https://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=74746.msg

HIV Medication Epivir Could Possibly Treat Alzheimer’s
https://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=74746.msg
39

Aidsmap article in full: https://www.aidsmap.com/news/may-2024/class-hiv-drugs-might-protect-against-alzheimers

In Brief:

Quote
A cohort of people with HIV who took NRTIs (a class of HIV drugs) as part of HIV treatment showed lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease than people without HIV.

Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are a class of drugs that block HIV’s RT enzyme. Since HIV’s RT is similar to the RTs produced in our cells, these same drugs may have the potential to block them too, possibly protecting against Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers collected data on three cohorts of people – those with HIV taking NRTIs; those with HIV either on an NRTI-free regimen or off treatment; and a third cohort who were not living with HIV nor taking NRTIs. They followed up each cohort for two years and nine months to see whether NRTIs reduced the rate of Alzheimer’s.

The data came from a large number of people, which reduces the likelihood of these findings being a chance event. Over 46,000 people were included in the cohort of those with HIV on NRTI-containing regimens. There were 33,000 people in the cohort of people with HIV not taking NRTIs and 151,000 people in the cohort without HIV and not taking NRTIs.

During the two years and nine months of follow-up, the rate of developing Alzheimer’s was lowest in the first cohort – people with HIV on an NRTI-containing regimen. In this cohort only 2.46 in 1000 people developed Alzheimer's disease.

In the second cohort of those with HIV either on an NRTI-free regimen or off treatment the rate of Alzheimer’s was higher compared to the first cohort, but still lower than the third cohort of those without HIV. However, the difference between this cohort and those without HIV became insignificant when age and sex were added to the analysis. In this cohort the rate of Alzheimer’s was 3.55 in 1000 people.

The third cohort had the highest rate of Alzheimer’s at 6.15 in 1000 people.

Interestingly, a further analysis of the first cohort revealed an increased rate of Alzheimer’s in those taking protease inhibitors (another class of HIV drugs) alongside their NRTIs. However, the difference was not statistically significant and it would be early to make any conclusions.

Last but not least, this was a retrospective study (one that collects data on the past medical records of people). Besides, it has a set of limitations such as a relatively short follow-up period and non-ideal match between cohorts with regards to age and sex. Randomised controlled studies would be required to get a more definitive answer to whether NRTIs protect against Alzheimer’s disease in people without HIV.
40

Aidsmap article in full:
https://www.aidsmap.com/news/may-2024/i-felt-i-was-dirty-experiences-gay-men-diagnosed-mpox-england

In Brief:

Quote
A recent study found that men diagnosed with mpox, clinicians and community stakeholders believe that the government's perceived inaction towards the illness was due to its association with stigmatised sexual minorities. This systemic failure was often compared to the initial response to the AIDS crisis.

With the exception of an Australian study, there has been limited qualitative research on the patient experience of mpox. To better understand the social and clinical support needs of people with mpox, researchers from University College London conducted interviews with 22 gay and bisexual men who were diagnosed with monkeypox in England in 2022. The researchers who conducted the interviews were also cisgender gay men.

During the 2022 outbreak, HIV-negative gay and bisexual men who had little experience with stigmatising illnesses found their mpox diagnosis to be particularly traumatic and a personally threatening experience. They often required additional support beyond what was available. However, men living with HIV seemed to handle the stigma better, drawing on resilience from past experiences with HIV.

Mpox was associated with significant feelings of stigma, particularly due to homophobic narratives that linked promiscuity with illness and disease. Some men were also discriminated against by sexual contacts, online, and in healthcare settings. All men who had contact with non-specialist hospital services (such as Accident and Emergency) after receiving an mpox diagnosis reported some degree of enacted stigma from staff, usually related to infection control measures.

Conclusion
The lack of cultural competence in some health services that catered to gay and bisexual men resulted in stigmatisation and, at times, distress. This highlights the importance of involving members of affected communities in co-producing, planning and delivering care – including contact tracing, where stigma is likely to be a significant barrier to engagement.

“This should be done continuously from the outset of outbreaks and be accompanied by appropriate funding, especially for community-based organisations who often face financial precarity,” the authors conclude.


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