HIV Prevention and Testing > How Can I Prevent HIV?

Same condom, does this increase any risk?

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Human10:
Hey guys, i have a question to make about prevention.

As is stated, oral sex even without condom is a negligible risk.

Also using condoms for vaginal intercourse is a way to prevent transmission.

I have this question.

If you are given oral and then have insertive vaginal intercourse using the same condom, does this increase any hiv risk, even if the condom was intact? I mean using it for both still erect, not removing it and reapplying it.

Thanks guys.

Jim Allen:

--- Quote from: Human10 on August 21, 2022, 05:50:32 pm ---oral sex even without condom is a negligible risk.
--- End quote ---

No.

Without condoms, receiving oral sex isn't a risk of acquiring HIV, neither is cunnilingus or rimming an HIV concern. However, giving a blowjob would have a minute risk that doesn't warrant concern or testing outside of the standard yearly routine.



--- Quote ---If you are given oral and then have insertive vaginal intercourse using the same condom, does this increase any hiv risk, even if the condom was intact? I mean using it for both still erect, not removing it and reapplying it.

--- End quote ---

No.

Using the same condom to receive oral sex and then engage in intercourse increases the risk that the condom might fail during the intercourse; however, as explained before, HIV can't transmit through an intact latex or polyurethane condom. Unless a condom obviously fails during intercourse, there is no reason to be stressing or testing for HIV outside of the standard yearly routine.


Some tips on correct condom usage:

Use approved condoms and check for a certification mark (e.g. FDA, C.E., ISO or Kitemark) because the condom then complies with safety standards. Check the expiry date and make sure the condom is still within date.

Use lubricant condom safe water-based lubricants make condoms more comfortable and reduce breakage risk. but avoid oil-based lubricants as they can weaken or break condoms.

As for putting the condom on correctly:

Incorrectly done, the risk of breakage can increase. Place the condom on top of the erect penis and pinch the teat at the end of the condom before you start to roll it down the penis. By doing this, you'll squeeze out any air bubbles and ensure there is room for the semen (cum). Roll the condom down to the base of the penis.

If it's on correctly, it will roll downwards easily. If you've started putting it on the wrong way, take it off, and even if you or your partner has not ejaculated (cum), there can still be semen or (pre-cum), so it's important to try again with a new condom. (More to do with risks from other STI's/pregancy than anything else)

Finally, never "test" the condom before or after intercourse. It's not needed at all and could damage the condom, as it's not designed as a reusable (re-stressed) product, and testing could lead you to mistakenly think that the condom was damaged during sex, when in fact, you caused the damage after the intercourse by trying to "test" it.

Instead, use condoms correctly and consistently. If they don't break during intercourse, there is no reason to stress or test for HIV outside of standard yearly screening.

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