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Author Topic: Stress & HIV?  (Read 2508 times)

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Offline FiercenBed

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Stress & HIV?
« on: January 07, 2007, 08:58:00 AM »
back in december i made a post to some topic about being angry about people always saying 'itll b fine' & ' everything being 'ok'. well as i said in my post.....everything was not okay. the meds werent working. vl climbing. doc didnt know what to do. i had a list oi's. work outa control. on call 24/7 for medical stuff. family issues. a bf who is neg < thank god hez bn there though> but a financial mess. and jesus christ the insurance; well pay for this wont pay for that thatz experimental thatz instrumental.....AAAAAAAAugh<i know i know im lucky to have it> and here comes my 1st poz xmas right around the corner. i had bn poked, prodded, stabbed, examined, xrayed to become BCBS worst nightmare.

i said in my post iv had enough. i need to get outa here. so u know what....i did. i packed a carry on. slammed the pager & cell phone on a co workers desk. told 2 people i was going outa town. they were like where? i said i dont know. they were like oh ooo hez gone crazy. drove to phily airport and told the ticket agent ill take the first seat i can outa the country<employee travel thing>.

i found myself in amsterdam. i felt like britney spears; i was like OH MY GOD. it was like i didnt have hiv anymore. i could drink alchole 1st time in months.<mmmmm....goood> ate food like it was going outa style <could b cause i was stoned all the time>. meet and talked to new people<id become a recluse in my own house>.that godforsaken rash was gone. headaches gone. and some other things you can only do in a foreign country:) i was walking over a canal and i was like oh my god i can feel my feet! the neuropathy that had plagued me for several months was GONE! i almost cried. and yes i took my meds.

well like most things and money it had to come to an end. but when i got back people were like god dam what happened to you? u look so much better. <i think it was the weed>. most importantly i felt better. but it wore off quickly starting w/ another no solutions another test trip to the doc. headaches back, rash, nausea and worse the neuropathy  came back and slowly got worse day by day.

all this babel is leading to a question. what r the specifics relating to stress and HIV? doc always saying reduce stress reduce stress. easier said then done. we all know about stress. i mean i have the same problems now that i had b4 HIV and a vacation is good for everyone. but the thing w/ the neuropathy & the rash  has me convinced that stress does something medically to HIV. I think itz the reason y i wont suppress. doc sez therez no reason for my lack of suppression. so im thinking instead of just 6 days i need to make some MAJOR changes. r there any studies about stress and itz relation to hiv?

« Last Edit: January 07, 2007, 05:09:19 PM by FiercenBed »

Offline Ann

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2007, 11:01:38 AM »
Hi FiercenBed,

Here's an abstract from one study showing a correlation between psychosocial factors and CD4 counts and viral load. I'll look for more later. I can't link you to the article, I've taken it from a database you won't be able to access.

Quote
Psychosocial Factors Predict CD4 and Viral Load Change in Men and Women With Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment
Gail Ironson,  Conall O'Cleirigh,  Mary Ann Fletcher,  Jean Philippe Laurenceau,  et al. Psychosomatic Medicine. Baltimore: Nov/Dec 2005.Vol.67, Iss. 6;  pg. 1013

Abstract (Document Summary)
Objective: Most previous longitudinal studies demonstrating relationships between psychosocial variables and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression utilized samples of gay men accrued before the era of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), without including viral load (VL) as an indicator of disease progression or assessing the impact of medication adherence. This study sought to determine whether psychosocial variables would predict both CD4 and VL changes in a diverse sample assessed entirely during the era of HAART and accounting for adherence effects.

Methods: This longitudinal study assessed a multiethnic HIV+ sample (n = 177) of men and women in the midrange of illness (CD4 number between 150 and 500; no previous acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS]-defining symptom) every 6 months for 2 years. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model change in CD4 and VL controlling for sociodemographics (age, gender, ethnicity, education) and medical variables (baseline CD4/VL, antiretroviral medications at each time point, adherence).

Results: Baseline depression, hopelessness, and education predicted the slope of CD4 and VL. Avoidant coping and life event stress predicted VL change. Cumulative variables produced stronger relationships (depression, avoidant coping, and hopelessness with CD4/VL slope and life events stress with VL slope). High cumulative depression and avoidant coping were associated with approximately twice the rate of decline in CD4 as low scorers and greater relative increases in VL. Social support was not significantly related to CD4 or VL slope.

Conclusions: Psychosocial factors contribute significantly to the variance in HIV disease progression (assessed through CD4 number and VL) in a diverse sample, accounting for adherence and do so in the era of HAART.[PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

It's well known that stress does a number on the immune system, whether or not a person is hiv positive. We see the effects stress can have on a person's health all the time over in the Am I forum.

I should be able to find more studies, so check this thread again.

Ann

 
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Ann

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2007, 11:23:40 AM »
Here's another abstract. This one is relating to hiv, stress and dietary concerns, but is relevant.

Quote
Severe Stress Events and Use of Stress-Management Behaviors Are Associated with Nutrition-Related Parameters in Men with HIV/AIDS
Stephanie M Tromble-Hoke,  Bobbie Langkamp-Henken,  Kimberly Reid,  Renee Hoffinger,  Constance R Uphold. American Dietetic Association. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Chicago: Oct 2005.Vol.105, Iss. 10;  pg. 1541

Abstract (Document Summary)
Objective: To determine whether severe stress events and more frequent use of stress-management behaviors among men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are associated with more desirable nutrition-related parameters.

Design: Data on sociodemographic variables, severe stress events, stress management, and nutrition-related parameters were obtained from interviews, venipunctures, medical record reviews, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and questionnaires from the baseline wave of a three-wave longitudinal study.

Subjects/Setting: The sample consisted of 226 men with HIV who were attending one of three infectious disease clinics.

Statistical Analyses Performed: Multivariable linear and logistic regression were used to determine the association of severe stress events and mean stress-management subscore with nutrition-related parameters when controlling for CD4+ T cells, age, income, and race.

Results: Men with more severe stress events were more likely to experience nausea (odds ratio=1.4, P<.01) and change in appearance (odds ratio=1.25, P=.02). Men who more frequently used stress-management behaviors had a lower body mass index (beta=-1.14, P=.02), lower percent body fat (beta=-1.12, P=.05), more frequent use of nutritional-health promoting behaviors (beta=.52, P<.01), and were less likely to experience a change in appearance (odds ratio=0.63, P=.05) and have unintentional weight loss (odds ratio=0.54, P=.05).

Conclusions: Men with more severe stress events are more likely to experience undesirable symptoms that could adversely influence nutritional health. More frequent use of stress-management behaviors may provide a coping mechanism for stress associated with HIV and ultimately improve nutritional health of men with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]


 
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Ann

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2007, 11:30:54 AM »
Here's something else that may be of interest:

Quote
Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Tai chi is a stress management approach for persons with HIV/AIDS

Abstract (Document Summary)
[Robins] and colleagues published their study in Applied Nursing Research (Research on psychoneuroimmunology: tai chi as a stress management approach for individuals with HIV disease. Appl Nurs Res, 2006;19(1):2-9).
 
Full Text (224   words)
Copyright 2006, Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com
2006 MAY 4 - (NewsRx.com) -- Tai chi is a stress management approach for persons with HIV/AIDS.

"Psychoneuroimmunology is a framework for mind-body practice and research that combines cutting-edge scientific exploration with holistic philosophy to appreciate and understand stress responses," scientists in the United States report.

"The rapidly growing research literature provides a foundation for building an integrative stress management model with the potential to positively influence the stress-disease relationship and, ultimately, health outcomes," wrote J.L. Robins and colleagues at Integrating Wellness Inc.

The researchers concluded, "This article introduces a novel tai chi intervention and provides quantitative and qualitative data from a randomized clinical trial indicating its effects on psychosocial variables in individuals living with various stages of HIV disease."

Robins and colleagues published their study in Applied Nursing Research (Research on psychoneuroimmunology: tai chi as a stress management approach for individuals with HIV disease. Appl Nurs Res, 2006;19(1):2-9).

For more information, contact J.L.W. Robins, Integrating Wellness Inc., Richmond, VA 23235, USA.

Publisher contact information for the journal Applied Nursing Research is: W B Saunders Co-Elsevier Inc., Independence Square West Curtis Center, Ste. 300, Philadelphia, PA 19106-3399, USA.

Keywords: Richmond, Virginia, United States, HIV/AIDS, Tai Chi, Neuroimmunology, Stress Management, Clinical Trial.

This article was prepared by Health & Medicine Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2006, Health & Medicine Week via NewsRx.com.
 

The field of Psychoneuroimmunology is fairly new, but has given us much information on how stress and other psycho-neurological factors impact our immune systems. It's a fascinating field. I highly recommend a book called THE SICKENING MIND: Brain, Behaviour, Immunity and Disease by Paul R. Martin as a good place to start learning more. It's available from Amazon.

Ann

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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Ann

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2007, 12:35:38 PM »
Quote
HIV/AIDS Mental Health; HIV-infected patients with history of mental trauma report greater physical pain
 
Hematology Week. Atlanta: Jul 25, 2005. pg. 98

Abstract (Document Summary)
[J. Leserman] concluded, "The effects of trauma and stress were not explained by CD4 lymphocyte count or HIV viral load; however, these effects appear to be largely accounted for by increases in current PTSD symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of addressing past trauma, stress, and current PTSD within clinical HIV care."
 
Full Text (438   words)
Copyright 2005, Hematology Week via NewsRx.com
2005 JUL 25 - (NewsRx.com) -- HIV-infected patients with history of mental trauma report greater physical pain.

"In addition to biological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, physical functioning, and utilization of health care may also be important indicators of health status in HIV-infected patients. There is insufficient understanding of the psychosocial predictors of health-related physical functioning and use of health services among those with this chronic disease.

"Therefore, the current study examines how trauma, severe stressful events, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depressive symptoms are related to physical functioning and health utilization in HIV-infected men and women living in rural areas of the South," researchers in the United States report.

"We consecutively sampled patients from 8 rural HIV clinics in 5 southern states, obtaining 611 completed interviews. We found that patients with more lifetime trauma, stressful events, and PTSD symptoms reported more bodily pain, and poorer physical, role, and cognitive functioning.

"Trauma, recent stressful events, and PTSD explained from 12 to 27% of the variance in health-related functioning, over and above that explained by demographic variables," wrote J. Leserman and coworkers at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

"In addition," investigators continued, "patients with more trauma, including sexual and physical abuse, and PTSD symptoms were at greater risk for having bed disability, an overnight hospitalization, an emergency room visit, and four or more HIV outpatient clinic visits in the previous 9 months."

"Patients with a history of abuse had about twice the risk of spending 5 or more days in bed, having an overnight hospital stay, and visiting the emergency room, compared with those without abuse."

Leserman concluded, "The effects of trauma and stress were not explained by CD4 lymphocyte count or HIV viral load; however, these effects appear to be largely accounted for by increases in current PTSD symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of addressing past trauma, stress, and current PTSD within clinical HIV care."

Leserman and colleagues published their study in Psychosomatic Medicine (How trauma, recent stressful events, and PTSD affect functional health status and health utilization in HIV-infected patients in the South. Psychosom Med, 2005;67(3):500-507).

For additional information, contact J. Leserman, University of N Carolina, Dept. Psychiatry, CB 7160, Medical School Wing C, Room 233, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Publisher contact information for the journal Psychosomatic Medicine is: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106-3621, USA.

Keywords: Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States HIV/AIDS, Health-Related Quality of Life, Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, Emotional Trauma, Physical Pain.

This article was prepared by Hematology Week editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2005, Hematology Week via NewsRx.com.
 
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline FiercenBed

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2007, 03:32:45 PM »
Tai chi  huh?......im gonna look in2 that. tried accupuncture...but all that zapping was a bitch.

thanx for the info:)
« Last Edit: January 07, 2007, 03:45:51 PM by FiercenBed »

Offline Queen Tokelove

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2007, 04:12:10 AM »
I wouldn't mind knowing more about tai chi. I meditate from time to time..
Started Atripla/Ziagen on 9/13/07.
10/31/07 CD4-265 VL- undetectable
2/6/08 CD4- 401 VL- undetectable
5/7/08 CD4- 705 VL- undetectable
6/4/08 CD4- 775 VL- undetectable
8/6/08 CD4- 805 VL- undetectable
11/13/08 CD4- 774 VL--undetectable
2/4/09  CD4- 484  VL- 18,000 (2 months off meds)
3/3/09---Starting Back on Meds---
4/27/09 CD4- 664 VL-- undetectable
6/17/09 CD4- 438 VL- 439
8/09 CD4- 404 VL- 1,600
01-22-10-- CD4- 525 VL- 59,000
Cherish the simple things life has to offer

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Offline Catman

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2007, 08:54:54 AM »
Stress does affect our health and worse if our immune system is compromised. I really get stressed out at work from time to time and my health seem to deteriorate when I'm like this. I'm almost finishing my Christmas vacation and I feel great. When I resume my job in two weeks I'm pretty sure I fall back into the awful feeling of stress. I just wish I could win a major prize in the lottery and retire and just get a part time job.
Catman

Meow to the birds
Meow to the tree's
Meow to the end
of this dreadful disease...

Offline FiercenBed

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2007, 03:54:32 PM »
im on board w/ ya catman. iv often said there should b a hiv resort somewhere. where we can all go hang out and the weather is perfect. i bet it would sell out. mayb we can ask donald trump for the money....lol

Offline Catman

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2007, 07:26:08 PM »
Ha,ha! That would be great just as long as our names and personal information are kept private. 8)
Catman

Meow to the birds
Meow to the tree's
Meow to the end
of this dreadful disease...

Offline koi1

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Re: Stress & HIV?
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2007, 08:33:14 PM »
Ah yes stress, the number one killer!

My brother in-law got cancer after having an extremely stressfull job for years. He beat it and started his own business and is doing much better.

I went downhill with a horribly stressfull year I had last year. It all happened in one year. I started having horrible digestive problems, then thrush, tiredness, diagnosis with aids, pcp.

Yes stress supressess the immune system. Stress, the number one killer.

I agree.
diagnosed on 11/20/06 viral load 23,000  cd4 97    8%
01/04/07 six weeks after diagnosis vl 53,000 cd4 cd4 70    6%
Began sustiva truvada 01/04/07
newest labs  drawn on 01/15/07  vl 1,100    cd4 119    7%
Drawn 02/10/07
cd4=160 viral load= 131 percentage= 8%
New labs 3/10/07 (two months on sustiva truvada
cd4 count 292  percentage 14 viral load undetectable

 


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