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Author Topic: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier  (Read 2612 times)

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Offline Tucsonwoody

  • Member
  • Posts: 396
Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« on: January 08, 2007, 04:30:34 PM »
One of Time magazine's Top 10 Most Under Reported Stories of 2006

Worldwide, tuberculosis a bacterial lung disease spread mainly by coughing kills one person every 18 seconds. And because HIV activates latent TB infection, tuberculosis has become the leading cause of AIDS-related deaths in the developing world. The TB vaccine is not very effective; diagnostic tests fail to identify at least 50% of cases, and patients often fail to complete the six-month treatment regimen, which contributes to new drug-resistant strains. Of the 9 million or so new TB cases each year, about 425,000 of them are resistant to standard medicines. One severely resistant strain that emerged in southern Africa this year is virtually impossible to treat.

I know I was tested for TB after recent diagnosis...guess I was lucky for a change not to have it.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2007, 06:08:20 PM by Tucsonwoody »
And I wished for guidance, and I wished for peace
I could see the lightning; somewhere in the east
And I wished for affection, and I wished for calm
As I lay there - Nervous in the light of dawn

Offline poet

  • Member
  • Posts: 934
  • Poet living and working in Central Maine
Re: TUBERCULOSIS GETS EVEN SCARIER
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2007, 04:37:11 PM »
Thanks for the post.  Resistance is a moral question.  If we, whoever 'we' are, supply drugs but not the means/staffing/money to make sure that drugs are taken as required for treatment, what we end up doing is creating resistance to the drugs.  The moral part gets into do we then only supply drugs to such countries and areas of the world where we have the funding/staffing/means to supply everything needed and not go in halfway?  Win
Winthrop Smith has published three collections of poetry: Ghetto: From The First Five; The Weigh-In: Collected Poems; Skin Check: New York Poems.  The last was published in December 2006.  He has a work-in-progress underway titled Starting Positions.

Offline Jnm594

  • Member
  • Posts: 111
  • Fight! Fight! Fight the Good Fight!
Re: TUBERCULOSIS GETS EVEN SCARIER
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2007, 04:40:19 PM »
Thanks for the info! Is there a website this was on? I'd be interested to read about it.

When it gets hard I always listen to my favorite song of all time..........

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJEYu3KgWCE

Offline Tucsonwoody

  • Member
  • Posts: 396
Re: TUBERCULOSIS GETS EVEN SCARIER
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2007, 04:52:44 PM »
Hey Jnm -

That info was just part of a list and is all that was posted on Time's site, so I don't know if they did a full article last year or not.  A quick Google search showed a bunch of new info available.  I glanced at the WHO site and they had this quote posted:

"The threat posed by XDR-TB on people living with HIV features prominently in key messages issued by health leaders to mark World AIDS Day"

That is the new untreatable strain mainly affecting Africa now but sure to spread I would guess and they have a .pdf article about it and a bunch of other stuff...so maybe that will give you some place to start.

Kevin
And I wished for guidance, and I wished for peace
I could see the lightning; somewhere in the east
And I wished for affection, and I wished for calm
As I lay there - Nervous in the light of dawn

Offline stratosphere

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
Re: TUBERCULOSIS GETS EVEN SCARIER
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2007, 05:42:18 PM »
Thanks for the post,  even if it is scary.  I read this and then i have to wonder why would i even risk going out to a smoky crowded bar or club for a few drinks when the chances are there that i might get sick with something floating in the air.  The cold weather and all of the sickness going around,  i think i owe it to myself and my partner to take better care of myself.  Anyway i think we have both agreed to take better care of ourselves and leave the old bar scene alone for a long long time.  We have each other and our house to work on,  not to mention a bunch of good friends and that's enough.
1/05   CD4 305  VL  ?        34%
2/05   CD4 310  VL  ?        35%
7/05   CD4 277  VL  <50    43%
11/05 CD4 516  VL  <50    46%
2/06   CD4 640  VL  <50    46%
6/06   CD4 578  VL  <50    46%
10/06 CD4 491  VL  <50    50%
3/07   CD4 674  VL  <50    50%
7/07   CD4 516  VL  <50    43%
11/07 CD4 635  VL  <50    44%
3/08   CD4 584  VL  <50    48%
7/08   CD4 510  VL  <50    49%
11/08 CD4 580  VL  <50    49%
2/09   CD4 661  VL  <50    50%

Offline Queen Tokelove

  • Member
  • Posts: 6,033
  • Smokey the Smurf
Re: TUBERCULOSIS GETS EVEN SCARIER
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2007, 05:55:43 PM »
I just got my tb test done in November. Since joining the ASO and their clinic, I have kept up with everything I need to get shot wise. I go to see my primary doc tomorrow.
Started Atripla/Ziagen on 9/13/07.
10/31/07 CD4-265 VL- undetectable
2/6/08 CD4- 401 VL- undetectable
5/7/08 CD4- 705 VL- undetectable
6/4/08 CD4- 775 VL- undetectable
8/6/08 CD4- 805 VL- undetectable
11/13/08 CD4- 774 VL--undetectable
2/4/09  CD4- 484  VL- 18,000 (2 months off meds)
3/3/09---Starting Back on Meds---
4/27/09 CD4- 664 VL-- undetectable
6/17/09 CD4- 438 VL- 439
8/09 CD4- 404 VL- 1,600
01-22-10-- CD4- 525 VL- 59,000
Cherish the simple things life has to offer

The Royal Blog

Offline Jody

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,840
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2007, 06:17:02 PM »
TB, like anything else is quite scary of course but when a co-worker was diagnosed with it several years back the Health Dept. sent around a representative to educate people about catching it and it seems you must be exposed to someone who has it for an extended period of time in a place it is conducive to spreading, for instance an hour or more daily for a month or more...I'm not sure of the specifics but I did gather that if you were on the subway for example and a rider was infected and you got off at your stop,  after being in the same car for one hour or so, even with a lack of ventilaton you would not catch it that way.   Experts correct me if I am wrong.

Jody 
"Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world".
 "Try to discover that you are the song that the morning brings."

Grateful Dead

Offline J.R.E.

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,259
  • Joined Dec-2003 Living positive, since 1985.
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2007, 06:26:12 PM »
Hello JNM,


This site offers a lessonn on TB, you can click below for some info ;


http://www.aidsmeds.com/OIs/TB1.htm



Ray

Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 25 mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


Diagnosed positive in 1985,.. In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started on  HAART on October 24th, 2003.

 As of 8/25/14,  t-cells are at 402, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 11%

  
 62 years young.

Offline Tucsonwoody

  • Member
  • Posts: 396
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2007, 06:38:07 PM »
Regarding risk of contractingTB from webmd.com  http://www.webmd.com/content/article/7/1680_53937

Because the bacteria that cause tuberculosis are transmitted through the air, the disease can be quite contagious. However, it is nearly impossible to catch TB simply by passing an infected person on the street. To be at risk, you must be exposed to the organisms constantly, by living or working in close quarters with someone who has the active disease. Even then, because the bacteria generally stay dormant after they invade the body; only 10% of people infected with TB will ever come down with the active disease. The remaining 90% will show no signs of infection, nor will they be able to spread the disease to others. Dormant infections can eventually become active, though, so even people without symptoms should receive medical treatment.

However, if the immune system weakens, such as in people with HIV or as we age, the bacteria can activate. In their active state, TB bacteria cause death of tissue in the infected organs, possibly resulting in death.
And I wished for guidance, and I wished for peace
I could see the lightning; somewhere in the east
And I wished for affection, and I wished for calm
As I lay there - Nervous in the light of dawn

Offline hussy_24

  • Member
  • Posts: 48
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2007, 07:19:27 PM »
i never had shots against TB, apparently when i was a baby the doctor said i had natural resistance, the nurse said the same thing when they tested everyone at 11/12 years of age. funny really, i always thought i was like superman lol, then i get HIV and seem to be a fast progressor ; ;, hope i dont get TB

Offline thirtysomething

  • Member
  • Posts: 124
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2007, 12:19:48 AM »
When I was diagnosed last March, doctors also found latent TB in my body. I just finished 9 months course of Isonazid last week. Damn, it was tough to take medicine everyday! Luckily, I adhered to it and finallly finished the course. I hope I don't have to start HIV meds soon!

Offline Sky

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  • Posts: 225
    • Myspace
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2007, 10:33:47 PM »
Another interesting fact I just learned in Nursing school, which doc's seem to forget, is that the PPD test for TB responds to an immune response, meaning your CD4s.  So if you have a low CD4 count you're going to show negative for the disease.  Us HIVer's need to have both the PPD (if your T's are high) and a chest xray if you're unsure, or have low CD4.  Otherwise you could have it and not know because your reading came out negative.
Poz since 2003.

Offline lydgate

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  • Posts: 1,022
  • Virgin, can't drive
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2007, 10:47:01 PM »
Conversely, you could NOT have it and the PPD can come back positive. This often happens when someone's been innoculated with the BCG vaccine. The "gold standard" for detecting TB is the QFT or Quantiferon-TB Gold. Expensive and difficult to perform, but possibly worth it for HIVers who think they may been exposed, and if it's available at a nearby clinic.

Congratulations, thirtysomething, on finishing with the INH therapy. That must be a relief. And with those numbers, it's highly unlikely you're going to need HIV meds soon.

Jay

Edited to add: In fact, 30something, you might want to consider joining the viremic controller/eliter controller study (or studies).
« Last Edit: January 09, 2007, 10:57:01 PM by lydgate »
Her finely-touched spirit had still its fine issues, though they were not widely visible. Her full nature, like that river of which Cyrus broke the strength, spent itself in channels which had no great name on the earth. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.

George Eliot, Middlemarch, final paragraph

Offline Strayboy74

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,054
  • tastes like chicken
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2007, 10:52:28 PM »
Conversely, you could NOT have it and the PPD can come back positive. This often happens when someone's been innoculated with the BCG vaccine. The "gold standard" for detecting TB is the QFT or Quantiferon-TB Gold. Expensive and difficult to perform, but possibly worth it for HIVers who think they may been exposed, and if it's available at a nearby clinic.

Congratulations, thirtysomething, on finishing with the INH therapy. That must be a relief. And with those numbers, it's highly unlikely you're going to need HIV meds soon.

Jay

I work in the Admin of the SF Jail System.  Our employees get tested two times a year.  Many of them end up testing positive because of the frequency of testing.

kinda fucked up.

I try to avoid going into the jail system. :)  lotsa crazies.

Offline Eldon

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  • Posts: 2,664
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2007, 11:59:11 PM »
Thanks. Something to keep an eye out for.

Offline aztecan

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,414
  • 29 years positive, 57 years a pain in the butt
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2007, 01:44:35 AM »
Three of my clients tested positive for TB.

One was described as latent, because it wasn't active in his lungs, but had spread to his lymphatic system. In fact, there was considerable necrotic tissue evident and he is just now finishing his nine months of TB treatment.

The second is a woman who had a positive PPD, but, gratefully, a negative chest X-ray. It is possible she was exposed and has dormant TB.

The third is a woman who has had TB for some time. She started treatment, then failed to complete it. At this point, I don't know if she is treatable.

A bit of trivia. TB is the reason it was illegal to spit on sidewalks in bygone days. I still find the habit revolting.

HUGS,

Mark
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline lydgate

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  • Posts: 1,022
  • Virgin, can't drive
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2007, 06:06:05 AM »
Mark, I'm curious about your clients. I'm assuming (1) all tested positive using the conventional PPD skin test, and (2) that they're all HIV positive. I'm NOT assuming (1) that they'd had the BCG vaccine, and (2) that they'd had repeated tests performed on them (which can sometimes lead to erroneous positive results as Joseph pointed out).

First guy: if TB "wasn't active in his lungs" does that mean his chest X-ray was normal? How did you/the clinic detect that the TB had spread to the lyphatic system?

Second: so positive PPD, negative chest X-ray -- treatment (INH) not warranted, or treatment not offered, or treatment offered but declined? And does "dormant" in this instance mean the same as "latent"?

Third: do you know why she failed to complete treatment? Side effect issues? Lifestyle affecting adherence?

On spit: spitting on the streets is a revolting habit, not a sign of masculinity but just boorishness; but I suppose it's OK in the woods, the wilds. And funny how spit can be so erotic, or eroticized, during sex, in ohsomany ways. Just sayin.  ;)

Jay
Her finely-touched spirit had still its fine issues, though they were not widely visible. Her full nature, like that river of which Cyrus broke the strength, spent itself in channels which had no great name on the earth. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.

George Eliot, Middlemarch, final paragraph

Offline aztecan

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,414
  • 29 years positive, 57 years a pain in the butt
Re: Tuberculosis Gets Even Scarier
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2007, 10:49:36 AM »
Hey Jay,
The first guy had a normal chest X-ray, meaning it wasn't active in his lungs at this time. It could have been in the past, but needn't have been. He did not exhibit any symptoms of active infection at the time I met him. The TB in his lymphatic system was found via biopsy done at a local hospital, not at a clinic.

In the second case, no treatment was offered because there is no evidence of active infection. It is possible she has been exposed to TB and it is dormant, therefore not active or contagious. This person can never use the PPD test again, but should have regular routine chest X-rays, especially should any symptoms appear.

The third person failed to complete treatment because of lifestyle. It is not uncommon and is a prevailing problem nationwide.

TB isn't mentioned often in the U.S. these days, but I run across it fairly regularly. If someone comes into my agency who is positive and a resident alien (someone not born in the U.S.) one of the first things done is either a PPD test or a chest X-ray.

PPD tests are far from infallible. Gratefully, the doc here is knowledgeable regarding this bacterial infection and any abnormal PPD results are followed up immediately even if no other symptoms are presenting themselves.

This is an important issue for all Hi fivers, but not one that people should panic about.

HUGS,

Mark
« Last Edit: January 10, 2007, 10:51:37 AM by aztecan »
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

 


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