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Author Topic: AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection  (Read 2117 times)

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Offline wanttolearn

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AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection
« on: December 30, 2006, 11:11:14 PM »
A "molecular condom" to protect women against HIV is being developed by US scientists.

The liquid formulated by a University of Utah team turns into a gel-like coating when inserted into the vagina.

Then, when exposed to semen, it returns to liquid form and releases an anti-viral drug to attack HIV.

However, the technology, featured in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, is still around five years away from being tested in humans.

   
We're shooting for a microbicide delivery system that would be used once a day or once a month
Dr Patrick Kiser
University of Utah

And the researchers predict it will be around 10 years before it might be in widespread use.

Researcher Dr Patrick Kiser said: "The ultimate hope for this technology is to protect women and their unborn or nursing children from the Aids virus."

The Utah project is part of a worldwide research effort to develop "microbicides" - drug-delivery systems such as gels, rings, sponges or creams to prevent infection by HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

They are seen as a way for women to gain power by protecting themselves from HIV, particularly in impoverished nations where Aids is widespread, where rape is rampant, or, where conventional condoms are taboo, not reliably available or where men resist using them.

Short-term effect

First-generation microbicides now being tested are expected to be available within four years and to be 50-60% effective.

However, Dr Kiser said they lasted only for a short time, meaning they had to be used shortly before sex.

The potential advantage of his technology is that it would be much longer lasting.

   
Microbicides could put the power of preventing HIV into women's hands
Yusef Azad
National Aids Trust

"We're shooting for a microbicide delivery system that would be used once a day or once a month," he said.

Tests have already shown that their 'hydrogel' is unlikely to cause significant side effects, or discomfort.

It is designed not to dehydrate vaginal cells, which can trigger infections, and not to be diluted by other fluids.

The next stage will be to see whether anti-viral drugs incorporated into the hydrogel can be released with the same efficiency as in the lab.

Indeed the researchers are hopeful that because the gel would be much thinner inside a woman than it was in the lab tests, the release of drugs should be even more effective.

High hopes

Yusef Azad, of the National Aids Trust, said: "Millions of women currently have little control over their sexual health and microbicides could put the power of preventing HIV into women's hands.

"It is vitally important that sufficient funding is channelled into the development of effective microbicides so that women have a range of options of products such as gels, liquids and creams that could provide a barrier to contracting HIV during sex."

Roger Pebody, treatment specialist for the HIV charity Terrence Higgins Trust said microbicides were one of the biggest hopes for preventing new HIV infections in the near future.

He said: "This is one of many projects that are in the early stages of development, however other microbicides could be as little as five years away."


Offline next2u

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AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2010, 10:27:22 PM »
AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_med_anti_aids_gel

  By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Medical Writer Marilynn Marchione, Ap Medical Writer    35 mins ago

For the first time, a vaginal gel has proved capable of blocking the AIDS virus: It cut in half a woman's chances of getting HIV from an infected partner in a study in South Africa. Scientists called it a breakthrough in the long quest for a tool to help women whose partners won't use condoms.

The results need to be confirmed in another study, and that level of protection is probably not enough to win approval of the microbicide gel in countries like the United States, researchers say. But they are optimistic it can be improved.

"We are giving hope to women," who account for most new HIV infections, said Michel Sidibe in a statement. He is executive director of the World Health Organization's UNAIDS program. A gel could "help us break the trajectory of the AIDS epidemic," he said.

And Dr. Anthony Fauci of the U.S. National Institutes of Health said, "It's the first time we've ever seen any microbicide give a positive result" that scientists agree is true evidence of protection.

The gel, spiked with the AIDS drug tenofovir, cut the risk of HIV infection by 50 percent after one year of use and 39 percent after 2 1/2 years, compared to a gel that contained no medicine.

To be licensed in the U.S., a gel or cream to prevent HIV infection may need to be at least 80 percent effective, Fauci said. That might be achieved by adding more tenofovir or getting women to use it more consistently. In the study, women used the gel only 60 percent of the time; those who used it more often had higher rates of protection.

The gel also cut in half the chances of getting HSV-2, the virus that causes genital herpes. That's important because other sexually spread diseases raise the risk of catching HIV.

Even partial protection is a huge victory that could be a boon not just in poor countries but for couples anywhere when one partner has HIV and the other does not, said Dr. Salim Abdool Karim, the South African researcher who led the study. In the U.S., nearly a third of new infections each year are among heterosexuals, he noted.

Countries may come to different decisions about whether a gel that offers this amount of protection should be licensed. In South Africa, where one in three girls is infected with HIV by age 20, this gel could prevent 1.3 million infections and 826,000 deaths over the next two decades, he calculated.

He will present results of the study Tuesday at the International AIDS Conference in Vienna. The research was published online Monday by the journal Science.

"We now have a product that potentially can alter the epidemic trends ... and save millions of lives," said Dr. Quarraisha Abdool Karim, the lead researcher's wife and associate director of the South African program that led the testing.

It's the second big advance in less than a year on the prevention front. Last fall, scientists reported that an experimental vaccine cut the risk of HIV infection by about 30 percent. Research is under way to try to improve it.

If further study shows the gel to be safe and effective, WHO will work to speed access to it, said its director-general, Dr. Margaret Chan.

The gel is in limited supply; it's not a commercial product, and was made for this and another ongoing study from drug donated by California-based Gilead Sciences Inc., which sells tenofovir in pill form as Viread. If further study proves the gel effective, a full-scale production system would need to be geared up to make it.

The study tested the gel in 889 heterosexual women in and near Durban, South Africa. Researchers had no information on the women's partners, but the women were heterosexual and, in general, not in a high-risk group, such as prostitutes.

Half of the women were given the microbicide and the others, a dummy gel. Women were told to use it 12 hours before sex and as soon as possible within 12 hours afterward.

At the study's end, there were 38 HIV infections among the microbicide group versus 60 in the others.

The gel seemed safe only mild diarrhea was slightly more common among those using it. Surveys showed that the vast majority of women found it easy to use and said their partners didn't mind it. And 99 percent of the women said they would use the gel if they knew for sure that it prevented HIV.

This shows that new studies testing the gel's effectiveness without a placebo group should immediately be launched, said Salim Abdool Karim. The only other study testing the gel now compares it to placebo and will take a couple more years to complete.

The study was sponsored by the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, or CAPRISA; Family Health International; CONRAD, an AIDS research effort based at Eastern Virginia Medical School; and the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID.

Gilead has licensed the rights to produce the gel, royalty-free, to CONRAD and the International Partnership on Microbicides for the 95 poorest countries in the world, said Dr. Howard Jaffe, president of the Gilead Foundation, the company's philanthropic arm.

The biggest cost of the gel is the plastic applicator about 32 cents, which hopefully would be lower when mass-produced, researchers said.

Mitchell Warren, head of the AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition, a nonprofit group that works on HIV prevention tools, said the study shows a preventive gel is possible.

"We can now say with great certainty that the concept has been proved. And that in itself is a day for celebration," he said.

___

Online:

AIDS conference: http://www.aids2010.org

and http://www.kff.org/aids2010

Microbicides: http://www.avac.org/ht/d/sp/a/GetDocumentAction/i/27266.
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Online Miss Philicia

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  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2010, 10:41:58 PM »
If you stopped toking for a minute you might have seen this.
"Ive slept with enough men to know that Im not gay"

Offline Rev. Moon

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  • Smart ass faggot
Re: AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2010, 10:56:14 PM »
If you stopped toking for a minute you might have seen this.

lulz...
"I have tried hard--but life is difficult, and I am a very useless person. I can hardly be said to have an independent existence. I was just a screw or a cog in the great machine I called life, and when I dropped out of it I found I was of no use anywhere else."

Offline georgep77

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  • Posts: 148
Re: AIDS breakthrough: Gel helps prevent infection
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2010, 02:17:25 AM »
If you stopped toking for a minute you might have seen this.
And the winner is..... !!Miss Philicia!! , her post was at 12:36 pm ..... Next2u at 8:27 pm

                   ;D
Come on Sangamo,  Geovax,  Bionor immuno, ...Make us happy !!!
+ 2008

Offline jrgire

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  • Posts: 2
Re: Molecular Condom
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2010, 05:29:43 PM »
I was happy to read about the recent success in Africa with this gel procedure in women.  I am wondering if it would be possible to develop the same procedure for men and women to use anally.  Would the gel have the same effect of attacking HIV cells in the anal canal of men and women?  If  not, what would be the reason it would not work.  It would seem that the anal canal would be much like the vaginal canal, when receiving the gel and killing HIV Cells in sperm.

Offline jrgire

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  • Posts: 2
NEW GEL TREATMENT FOR WOMEN IN AFRICA
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2010, 04:09:55 PM »
I was happy to read about the recent success in Africa with this gel procedure in women.  I am wondering if it would be possible to develop the same procedure for men and women to use anally.  Would the gel have the same effect of attacking HIV cells in the anal canal of men and women?  If  not, what would be the reason it would not work.  It would seem that the anal canal would be much like the vaginal canal, when receiving the gel and killing HIV Cells in sperm.

 


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