Quantcast

Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 21, 2014, 04:16:30 PM

Login with username, password and session length


Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 635506
  • Total Topics: 48209
  • Online Today: 271
  • Online Ever: 585
  • (January 07, 2014, 02:31:47 PM)
Users Online

Welcome


Welcome to the POZ/AIDSmeds Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

Privacy Warning:  Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If you are HIV positive and disclose this in our forums, then it is almost the same thing as telling the whole world (or at least the World Wide Web). If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.

  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.

  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.

  • Forums members must behave at all times with respect and honesty. Posting guidelines, including time-out and banning policies, have been established by the moderators of these forums. Click here for “Am I Infected?” posting guidelines. Click here for posting guidelines pertaining to all other POZ/AIDSmeds community forums.

  • We ask all forums members to provide references for health/medical/scientific information they provide, when it is not a personal experience being discussed. Please provide hyperlinks with full URLs or full citations of published works not available via the Internet. Additionally, all forums members must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge.

  • Product advertisement—including links; banners; editorial content; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from POZ.

To change forums navigation language settings, click here (members only), Register now

Para cambiar sus preferencias de los foros en español, haz clic aquí (sólo miembros), Regístrate ahora

Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Author Topic: HIV Replication in Lymphatic Tissues  (Read 1201 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Mishma

  • Member
  • Posts: 190
    • Marquis de Vauban
HIV Replication in Lymphatic Tissues
« on: February 06, 2014, 12:16:46 AM »
This is old news in a sense but one that has to be continually reinforced to non Infectious Disease specialists. As one who suffers from chronic inflammation with Lupus like symptoms, polyneuropathy and neurological BS it gets my goat whenever another health care professional says, "Your HIV is well controlled-just look at your labs." Viral burden is routinely measured in our bloodstream but not in our lymphatic tissues-where the majority of our immune cells reside. Poor penetration of this tissue by our current drugs is insufficient to eradicate the virus and it is suggested that low concentrations of the drugs in these tissues actually supports ongoing replication. 


HIV/AIDS
How Much Do Drugs Matter?
Anandi N. Sheth

http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/222/222ec25.short

or the original article: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/01/23/1318249111.full.pdf+html

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30308, USA. E-mail: ansheth@emory.edu

Antiretroviral drugs have increased life expectancy and improved quality of life for HIV-infected patients. However, although these drugs suppress HIV replication in the blood, they do not eliminate HIV-infected cells. Hence, current treatment cannot cure the infection and must be lifelong. Indeed, even treated HIV-infected patients have persistent immune system abnormalities, including incomplete immune restoration, chronic inflammation, and their sequelae. One explanation for these ongoing complications is that viral replication may persist in the lymphatic tissues, the network of immune cells located in the lymph nodes, gut, and other organs in which most HIV is produced and stored.

Fletcher et al. explored the hypothesis that antiretroviral drug concentrations may be insufficient to completely suppress HIV replication in lymphatic tissues. The authors followed 12 HIV-infected patients who were starting antiretroviral therapy and collected their blood, lymph node, and gut samples at frequent intervals over 6 months. The authors used specialized techniques to measure antiretroviral drug concentrations inside the immune cells in these tissues. Interestingly, the drug levels inside immune cells from the lymphatic tissues were lower than inside immune cells from the blood. The authors then sought to determine whether these drug levels were suppressing virus replication in the lymphatic tissues. They measured the amount and location of virus produced in the lymphatic tissues and found, in four out of nine patients with sufficient data for analysis, evidence that the virus was continuing to replicate in these tissues, even when it was fully suppressed in the blood. Last, the authors found a direct correlation between drug levels and the quantity of viral replication in the tissues.

This study demonstrates that HIV continues to replicate in the lymphatic tissues of some HIV-infected patients receiving therapy despite suppression of viral replication in the blood. Additionally, the study supports that low concentrations of anti-HIV drugs may contribute to this ongoing replication in the tissues. This study importantly suggests that strategies to improve drug penetration into lymphatic cells could overall reduce viral replication. Fully suppressing viral replication in all sites could improve the long-term consequences of HIV infection and provide the first step toward a cure.

C. V. Fletcher et al., Persistent HIV-1 replication is associated with lower antiretroviral drug concentrations in lymphatic tissues. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., published online 27 January 2014 (10.1073/pnas.1318249111). [Full Text]
« Last Edit: February 06, 2014, 12:20:02 AM by Mishma »
2016 CD4 25% UD (less than 20). 27+ years positive. Isentress, Truvada, Acyclovir, Clonazepam, Zolpidem, Bupropion, Lisinopril, Pravastatin, Quetiapine, Doxcycline, Testosterone, Suatriptan/Naproxen, Restasis, Dorzolamide, Latanoprost, Asprin, lortab, Levothyroxine, Fioricet, Restasis, Triamclinolone, Nitrostat.

Offline Mishma

  • Member
  • Posts: 190
    • Marquis de Vauban
Re: HIV Replication in Lymphatic Tissues
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2014, 02:09:51 PM »
Reason for hope: "This study importantly suggests that strategies to improve drug penetration into lymphatic cells could overall reduce viral replication. Fully suppressing viral replication in all sites could improve the long-term consequences of HIV infection and provide the first step toward a cure."
2016 CD4 25% UD (less than 20). 27+ years positive. Isentress, Truvada, Acyclovir, Clonazepam, Zolpidem, Bupropion, Lisinopril, Pravastatin, Quetiapine, Doxcycline, Testosterone, Suatriptan/Naproxen, Restasis, Dorzolamide, Latanoprost, Asprin, lortab, Levothyroxine, Fioricet, Restasis, Triamclinolone, Nitrostat.

Offline Mishma

  • Member
  • Posts: 190
    • Marquis de Vauban
Re: HIV Replication in Lymphatic Tissues
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2014, 02:04:08 PM »
From Nature: Radioactive tracers map spread of HIV

http://www.nature.com/news/radioactive-tracers-map-spread-of-hiv-analogue-1.14704?WT.ec_id=NEWS-20140218

"Hidden virus

Some monkeys controlled the infection, either naturally or after treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and had undetectable levels of virus in their blood plasma. But the scanning images showed a residual signal in the small intestines, lymph tissues and male reproductive tract, although none was present in the large intestines."
2016 CD4 25% UD (less than 20). 27+ years positive. Isentress, Truvada, Acyclovir, Clonazepam, Zolpidem, Bupropion, Lisinopril, Pravastatin, Quetiapine, Doxcycline, Testosterone, Suatriptan/Naproxen, Restasis, Dorzolamide, Latanoprost, Asprin, lortab, Levothyroxine, Fioricet, Restasis, Triamclinolone, Nitrostat.

Offline xinyuan

  • Member
  • Posts: 108
Re: HIV Replication in Lymphatic Tissues
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2014, 08:15:51 PM »
Although we already know about these reservoirs, that we're closer to mapping it is exciting.

A feasible step closer toward focused eradication.

Thanks for the link.

 


Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.