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Wistar Institute to Launch Largest Randomized Trial Aiming for an HIV Cure

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Miss Philicia:
read write up here: Wistar to Launch Largest Randomized Trial Aiming for an HIV Cure by Diminishing Viral Reservoir Beyond Current Therapies

(perhaps this Wistar grant/award was already discussed last week but I wanted local people know about clinics looking for participants)

And today it was announced that my ASO/HIV clinic will be a major participant, so if you live in the Philadelphia are and wish to see if you are eligible contact Philly Fight or perhaps your own clinic (Temple, UPenn or Mazzoni) is participating.

xinyuan:
Hope this trial has a good result.

However, the side effects (flu-like symptoms being the most major) of interferon therapy make me queasy just thinking about them. That, combined with the experience people on the therapy for hepatitis C have told me.

http://www.webmd.com/cancer/interferon-alfa

Ann:

--- Quote from: xinyuan on January 23, 2014, 09:13:24 PM ---
However, the side effects (flu-like symptoms being the most major) of interferon therapy make me queasy just thinking about them. That, combined with the experience people on the therapy for hepatitis C have told me.


--- End quote ---

I was treated for hep C back in 2002/03 and I would certainly think twice before taking interferon again. I call that year on hcv treatment my "black-hole-year". It was a horrible experience that I would NOT be in a rush to go through again, even if it were only for a relatively short time (compared to 52 weeks).

My ex-husband also did the hcv treatment, but only for six months and he did not achieve a sustained response, unlike myself. He hasn't tried again because it was such a bad experience for him too - but we're keeping a close eye on the new interferonless treatment protocol currently being studied with good results (so far).

It mentions in that article (that Miss P linked to) that 'This “pegylated” form of interferon was approved in 2008 to treat hepatitis B and C infections.' I'm not sure where they got the idea that it was approved in 2008 - I started on the peg-interferon in April 2002. I was one of the first patients in the Liverpool area to get it, as it had only been approved in the UK about a month earlier. But that's six years earlier than the article claims, and IIRC it was approved in the US about six months before that. Makes me wonder what else they may have gotten wrong in their reporting.

What also gets me wondering (about the trial) is that when I was on interferon, I wasn't on hiv meds. If interferon was pushing hiv out of my reservoirs, why didn't my hiv VL go through the roof? It stayed pretty much the same as it had been, if not lower. Maybe (probably?) I'm missing something.

Questions, questions, questions. (Yes, I understand that the whole idea of studies is to answer questions.)

geobee:
Not much new in this article, but the video is worth watching.

http://phys.org/wire-news/151074681/wistar-receives-funding-to-lead-trial-to-diminish-hiv-1-viral-re.html

xinyuan:
Test trial by the Wistar group:

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/207/2/213.long

They claim to have lowered reservoir. However, when the change is 0.000783 to 0.000292 copies of HIV DNA/CD4+ T cell, I'm not sure how clinically significant that is (read: not necessarily practical). Plus, it could just be a blip / noise.

Besides. The established reservoir test is culturing CD4's and inducing them to see if they produce virus. Not PCR techniques (see TAG blog on anti-latency).

I look forward to their pilot study result (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01935089)

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