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Author Topic: Life expectancy. Another report.  (Read 3201 times)

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Offline mitch777

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Life expectancy. Another report.
« on: December 18, 2013, 08:40:50 PM »
I thought this was interesting. Not so sure it would hold true to some of us LTS at this point but might give some insights to those who find themselves questioning the years to come.

It's sad that not all of us have the same support system and access to healthcare as well as facing the stigma that still exists in our society that prevents some from taking care of themselves.

On a positive note, things are looking brighter each and every year for many. :)

http://www.healthline.com/health-news/hiv-life-expectancy-for-americans-with-hiv-reaches-parity-121813

« Last Edit: December 18, 2013, 08:42:51 PM by mitch777 »
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Online buginme2

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2013, 09:02:28 PM »
 This paragraph stuck out for me:

The gay demographic, he said, tends to get tested for HIV regularly and to begin antiretroviral drugs immediately. Gallant, who said he sees HIV patients even in their eighties, noted that more people are being diagnosed at a later age, in part because older people tend not to get tested as often.Early detection and treatment can now mean a normal lifespan for otherwise healthy Americans. The study results show that people who begin taking antiretroviral drugs earlier live longer. 


 Other than that, does anyone else just get tired, overwhelmed, bothered by articles attempting to predict when you're going to die?



Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2013, 09:12:31 PM »
 
 Other than that, does anyone else just get tired, overwhelmed, bothered by articles attempting to predict when you're going to die?

I do. Just thought any light is a good light. Same could be said for "the cure".

While I don't spend really any time myself anymore on these issues I remember having hope in 1983 that a cure was around the corner. I'm sure the same hope applies to someone who got the bug yesterday.
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Offline tednlou2

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2013, 09:17:05 PM »
I love seeing any story that suggests a near-normal or normal lifespan.  For those coming here newly dx'd, it helps to see studies and analysis like this. 

Offline Habersham

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2013, 09:22:28 PM »
What was Stephen King's line in Pet Sematary?  Sometimes dead is better?
Because I Can

Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2013, 09:27:03 PM »
 ::)
What was Stephen King's line in Pet Sematary?  Sometimes dead is better?
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Online Miss Philicia

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2013, 09:33:19 PM »
What's the average life expectancy for patients who began HIV treatment before the "good drugs" came out?

Naturally this is never studied...
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline newt

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2013, 10:40:29 PM »
Quote
What's the average life expectancy for patients who began HIV treatment before the "good drugs" came out?

Naturally this is never studied.

It has been, and I can't leak the results, but expect a paper next Jan/Feb. The results are encouraging, if not perfect (ie equal odds of survival achieved compared to people starting treatment post 1966). But I can't leak the results in detail.

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline wolfter

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2013, 03:35:06 AM »
What's the average life expectancy for patients who began HIV treatment before the "good drugs" came out?

Naturally this is never studied...

Since many of us are here still 20+ years later, I'd say it's pretty good.  Being told that I could possibly live to be 30 if all went well and now seeing age 50 coming my way makes me feel pretty damn good.  Plus, I've never been average at anything. :D
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2013, 10:39:35 AM »
Since many of us are here still 20+ years later, I'd say it's pretty good.
while not all that many of us made it until now; the ones who did seem to be hanging in there a nice long time.

see the newest Sept 2013 POZ magazine article "older and wiser" page 28 and learn there's only about 50k people infected in the 80s who are still around.
http://www.poz.com/articles/older_and_wiser_2791_24349.shtml
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline denb45

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2013, 10:54:38 AM »
I never even though I'd still be around to see my late 50's

but from the looks of my current state of health

I'm gonna be around a lot longer than I had previously though

as long as i continue to take care of my current health

it's all of the aging painful health issues, that I'm struggling with

now, that worries me  :-X

HUGS

DEN
"it's so nice to be insane, cause no-one ask you to explain" Helen Reddy cc 1974

Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2013, 01:28:48 PM »
It has been, and I can't leak the results, but expect a paper next Jan/Feb. The results are encouraging, if not perfect (ie equal odds of survival achieved compared to people starting treatment post 1966). But I can't leak the results in detail.

- matt


Matt is a tease. :)
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Online Miss Philicia

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2013, 03:49:13 PM »
Since many of us are here still 20+ years later, I'd say it's pretty good.  Being told that I could possibly live to be 30 if all went well and now seeing age 50 coming my way makes me feel pretty damn good.  Plus, I've never been average at anything. :D

I've buried six people in the past two years, and that does not include people from this forum. I'd say that kinda sucks.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline pittman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2013, 08:19:42 PM »
I've buried six people in the past two years, and that does not include people from this forum. I'd say that kinda sucks.

Yeah, that certainly has to make an impact. Having multiple people you care about die is painful. It is especially hard if they are younger.

I had three employees, whom I also considered friends, die in the last 6 years, and only one was over 50.  The other two were in their 30s and took care of themselves. Finally, a 24 year old that worked for me almost died last year on his honeymoon and just made it in time to the hospital. For the most part, there really was no effective way that these individuals would have been able to catch/detect their condition ahead of time, and the three that died only survived 2-6 months from diagnoses. 

Not a one was, to my knowledge, HIV+ but all had cancer of one kind or another. This all happened roughly in the early time I was diagnosed, and I was really freaked out, as it was a powerful reminder of (my own) mortality at a time when I was already preoccupied by death.

As a little more time has passed, I recognize that there are so many things that could happen to us from a health perspective that I have at least started thinking of HIV as just one of the countless things that one could have to deal with.   Unlike the three guys that died, there are at least treatment options for me. If I am lucky, I will lead a normal lifespan and be around to bitch about aches and pains and going wrinkly.

Compared to what happened to them, I now see that I am incredibly lucky to be here now, even tough I really really hate having HIV.

I suspect that if, like you, I was burying friends with HIV, it would be a little different, as that hits a bit closer to home.   Just hoping I have a long time ahead before I have any more friends pass.

Offline randym431

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2013, 08:28:41 PM »
After 10+ years knowingly being pos for me, and 10 years on meds, and now technically a senior citizen, all I can say or advise it that it does get better.

Maybe I'm one of the more lucky, but one pill a day with zero side effects and being the healthiest person I know among my all family members, I really just don't think about HIV.

That could be said to be a bad thing too.
A bad thing in that sexually active folks might let down their guard and take for granted that HIV was no longer that menacing disease it once was.

As treatment improves and we see positive people living longer and longer normal lives, I can easily see on the other hand where the epidemic could explode once again.
I can think of a lot of other health issues more terrifying then being positive, in todays world with todays treatments, but at the same time I feel we positive folks should downplay the good part when it comes to treatment success.

No, do not say, "DEAD IS BETTER", instead simply say "NEGATIVE IS STILL BETTER".

My fear is with too many people letting down their guard.
Believing HIV is no longer their threat.

Bottom line here is that few if any of us long term survivors would be long term survivors if not for modern medicine.
The meds are truly effective, and sure has changed the face of HIV compared back to those days before effective treatments were available.
I can not imagine becoming positive back then before we had effective treatment.
That death sentence.
I can't imagine.

When it comes to pills and medications, non-dependency still far outweighs dependency. You can not join those statics of long term survivor without also the long term treatment dependency.

Offline pittman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2013, 09:34:23 PM »
I can think of a lot of other health issues more terrifying then being positive, in todays world with todays treatments, but at the same time I feel we positive folks should downplay the good part when it comes to treatment success.

I'm a bit conflicted on this, but ultimately I am not sure I can agree. 

First, I don't think that saying there is effective treatment is what leads to more infections.  Not hearing about AIDS related deaths in the news may put keep this less in the forefront I suppose. However, purposely using fear-- especially of death, as a means to motivate is more likely to promote stigma than it would safe practices.

It is largely the now outdated impact of not having effective HIV treatments that solidified support for criminalization laws which stand in stark contrast to the treatment of similarly impactful deseases.

Seems to me that simply saying that there are very effective treatments availible, but that it is a lifelong chronic condition is honest enough. Untreated HIV is what should be scary. The rest should be a pain in the butt that you'll always wish you weren't dealing with, but which you know you can deal with.


Offline wolfter

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2013, 10:04:21 AM »
while not all that many of us made it until now; the ones who did seem to be hanging in there a nice long time.
http://www.poz.com/articles/older_and_wiser_2791_24349.shtml

So we've got a better chance of winning the lotto than being a LTS from the 80s. 

I hope I don't appear to be making lite of this.  I've witnessed so much death and destruction from this virus that I've tended to become almost flippant.   
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2013, 01:13:58 PM »
So we've got a better chance of winning the lotto than being a LTS from the 80s. 
ah! so that explains it. ;D I broke through my baptist upbringing and bought mega millions lottery tickets the other day. I guess then I didn't win that lottery because I won the living-with-AIDS-since-the-80s lottery. LOL
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Online Jeff G

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2013, 01:16:54 PM »
 ;)
ah! so that explains it. ;D I broke through my baptist upbringing and bought mega millions lottery tickets the other day. I guess then I didn't win that lottery because I won the living-with-AIDS-since-the-80s lottery. LOL

I think you may have broke through the baptist upbringing before just the other day, just my hunch  ;)   

Offline wolfter

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2013, 01:21:21 PM »
;)
I think you may have broke through the baptist upbringing before just the other day, just my hunch  ;)

If we had adhered to our Southern Baptist teachings, we'd still be straight, married, and clean.    ;D
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2013, 01:22:42 PM »
However, purposely using fear-- especially of death, as a means to motivate is more likely to promote stigma than it would safe practices.
except sometimes stigma itself can bring about safe practices. A great example to consider is the whole of the anti-smoking campaign over the last 2 decades. Fear of a cancerous death has brought about stigma against smokers which had lead many people to not smoke - because it is no longer "cool".

Seems to me that simply saying that there are very effective treatments availible, but that it is a lifelong chronic condition is honest enough. Untreated HIV is what should be scary. The rest should be a pain in the butt that you'll always wish you weren't dealing with, but which you know you can deal with.
yes, that's a very teen's  (as in 2013) way for viewing it; although that was not, and still is not, the way to consider HIV infections from the early half of the 00s, to the 90s, and to the 80s
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Online buginme2

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2013, 05:49:57 PM »

yes, that's a very teen's  (as in 2013) way for viewing it; although that was not, and still is not, the way to consider HIV infections from the early half of the 00s, to the 90s, and to the 80s

But it is2013 (almost 2014) so why are people still espousing an 80's, 90's, or even 00's view of the issue? 

Exaggerating the seriousness isn't an honest representation of the facts.

Offline wolfter

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2013, 06:06:38 PM »
But it is2013 (almost 2014) so why are people still espousing an 80's, 90's, or even 00's view of the issue? 

Exaggerating the seriousness isn't an honest representation of the facts.

So potentially dying from an untreated HIV infection isn't serious or an accurate representation?  ;)
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline WillyWump

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2013, 06:55:55 PM »
Meh, I'll die when I die and not a minute sooner.
POZ since '08

Last Labs-
6/3/14 CD4- 736, UD 34%
6/25/13 CD4- 1036, UD,
2/4/13, CD4 - 489, UD, 28%

Current Meds: Prezista/Epzicom/ Norvir
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Offline pittman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2013, 08:13:09 PM »
So potentially dying from an untreated HIV infection isn't serious or an accurate representation?  ;)

That was what I was saying actually. Downplaying the success of treatment is not accurate, and most likely counter productive. Honestly explaining where current science stands does not imply that HIV isn't serious. Rather, it should point out that HIV will lead to death if not treated (as can syphilis or other diseases mind you), so one should be tested and treated.

Once you start thinking in policy terms rather than individual terms, treatment as prevention becomes one of the most effective curbs in the spread of HIV.  Safer sex education, drug treatment, needle exchanges, etc. are all valid tools as well.


Offline pittman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2013, 08:36:48 PM »
except sometimes stigma itself can bring about safe practices. A great example to consider is the whole of the anti-smoking campaign over the last 2 decades. Fear of a cancerous death has brought about stigma against smokers which had lead many people to not smoke - because it is no longer "cool".
Stigma is an incredibly poor tool for encouraging that type of safety. Another analogy that is more apt would be abstinence versus safe sex programs. While abstinence itself is quite effective, abstinence programs fail spectacularly to curb risky behavior. They are generally peer pressure and stigma/shame based. They actually lead most often to more risky behaviors.

Stigma and fear of death and specifically criminalization, can lead to not getting tested or treated. Not only endangering the life of the infected individual, but also increasing the chance they will infect others through blissful self imposed ignorance.

yes, that's a very teen's  (as in 2013) way for viewing it; although that was not, and still is not, the way to consider HIV infections from the early half of the 00s, to the 90s, and to the 80s

Of course. Those that are long term survivors lived through very different and harrowing experience, and were faced with bleaker future prospects. Even now, they continue to face health challenges that more recently diagnosed individuals are likely to avoid for the most part. Treatment as prevention was not even a viable or realistic option at that point.

Truvada as a prophylactic measure is now an option, but even that is socially stigmatized. I really think that we need to adjust policy and prevention programs to reflect newer realities.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2013, 08:41:16 PM by pittman »

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2013, 09:32:49 PM »
But it is2013 (almost 2014) so why are people still espousing an 80's, 90's, or even 00's view of the issue? 

Exaggerating the seriousness isn't an honest representation of the facts.
because without being tested and/or without being treated (or treated in time), HIV is still the same terminal disease it was in the 80s. So it's no exaggeration at all. People in America did actually die of AIDS this year - and they weren't all LTSs. For many of them, coming from a standpoint of living in 2013 without having been tested in time, ended up living their life with HIV - and ending it - just as many did in the early years.

Personally, I believe the HIV message that we must espouse is a mixed-message. It's chronic and easily manageable; or it can be horrible and quite deadly. The take-away message is: take your meds and live like it's going to be 2014 or don't take them and die (after dealing with all the ill effects of HIV/AIDS first) like it's 1985. That's the honest facts of HIV at the end of 2013
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2013, 09:43:59 PM »
Stigma is an incredibly poor tool for encouraging that type of safety. Another analogy that is more apt would be abstinence versus safe sex programs. While abstinence itself is quite effective, abstinence programs fail spectacularly to curb risky behavior. They are generally peer pressure and stigma/shame based. They actually lead most often to more risky behaviors.
quite true; but not for 100% of the population. I mentioned my religious upbringing earlier. That religious stigma against pre-martial sex led many people in my class to remain abstinent. I myself remained abstinent until I was 21 (ah ha! that was the year I threw off the religious shackles, Jeff. I drank, smoked pot, cussed and screwed that year for the first time - and it was awesome!)

so just as I mentioned that we have to espouse a mixed message about HIV, I think we have to employ numerous message delivery methods to cover all bases. For some people educational messages, for some scary, and for some a commandment to obey.

fear of death... , can lead to not getting tested or treated.
seems like fear of death would actually be a pretty decent motivation to get tested and/or treated.

I would even go so far as to suggest it's partially a fear of death that has lead so many PLWH to use HAART, which has then led to this wonderal life expectancy report. ;)
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline mecch

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2013, 10:12:48 PM »
Personally, I believe the HIV message that we must espouse is a mixed-message. It's chronic and easily manageable; or it can be horrible and quite deadly. The take-away message is: take your meds and live like it's going to be 2014 or don't take them and die (after dealing with all the ill effects of HIV/AIDS first) like it's 1985. That's the honest facts of HIV at the end of 2013

I agree. The message should be full information.  Most people have to come up to speed on both these messages.

To which I would also add the information about the social, affective, economic, and professional challenges of being HIV+ for anyone who is. (And then the psychological, which just stem from all the other challenges anyway.)  These challenges are not resolved just because the viral infection can be managed.

Wasn't it a good 10 years in the 2000's that there was a fear that people were not afraid enough about HIV because the news on HAART was too good. (The "one-pill-a-day" rosy picture.) People thought the counter balance was to remind how serious and deadly HIV is.  And there was a good long run about how awful the HAART was. ("It's a poison pill a day, sweeties...") 

But talking about all the other baggage that comes with HIV can counter-balance the good news on the treatment, can be dissuasive of risk. And anyway, its the the full story...
« Last Edit: December 20, 2013, 10:15:48 PM by mecch »
ďFrom each, according to his ability; to each, according to his needĒ 1875 K Marx

Offline harleymc

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2013, 05:24:10 AM »
Quote
What's the average life expectancy for patients who began HIV treatment before the "good drugs" came out?

Naturally this is never studied...

I'm not sure about miss Philicia but if it's not life I'm expecting, then at least another 40 or years of being a bitter twisted old thing.

Offline wolfter

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2013, 07:49:22 AM »


Once you start thinking in policy terms rather than individual terms, treatment as prevention becomes one of the most effective curbs in the spread of HIV.  Safer sex education, drug treatment, needle exchanges, etc. are all valid tools as well.
The best way (IMHO) to curtail this virus is open and honest communication, tempered with reality.

Oh, and I don't even know what treatment as prevention really encompasses.
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Online Jeff G

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2013, 08:07:45 AM »
The best way (IMHO) to curtail this virus is open and honest communication, tempered with reality.

Oh, and I don't even know what treatment as prevention really encompasses.

One of the may benefits of ART is that being undetectable makes it unlikely that you can transmit the virus especially if coupled with safer sex practices . Treatment as prevention is presented as one of the many tools that may help prevent transmission .

Offline Alan_B

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2013, 02:56:58 PM »
Ok so it is probably good for newly diagnosed folk to read. . . . .but I don't hold it in much regard tbh.

How can anyone possibly predict what age anyone who is just newly diagnosed is expected to live to? I was diagnosed at 23 and started treatment immediately. Tbh I don't expect to live to another 54 years nor would I want to know the effects of 54 years of HAART. Doesn't mean I won't save for my old age, but I don't plan on working until my mid 60s either.

Edit: sorry for the doom and gloom and merry xmas btw ;)
Diagnosed - 01 Dec 2011 cd4 500
                  17 Jan 2012 cd4 520 vl 250k
                  02 Feb 2012 cd4 490 16% vl 167k - atripla
                  28 Jun 2012 cd4 610 24% vl 75
                       Jul 2012 cd4 870     Changed meds
                      Aug 2012 cd4 660 UD
                      Nov 2012 cd4 640 UD

"There is nothing wrong with going to bed with someone of your own sex. People should be very free with sex; they should draw the line at goats."  ~ Sir Elton John

Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #33 on: December 25, 2013, 09:25:48 PM »
Ok so it is probably good for newly diagnosed folk to read. . . . .but I don't hold it in much regard tbh.

How can anyone possibly predict what age anyone who is just newly diagnosed is expected to live to? I was diagnosed at 23 and started treatment immediately. Tbh I don't expect to live to another 54 years nor would I want to know the effects of 54 years of HAART. Doesn't mean I won't save for my old age, but I don't plan on working until my mid 60s either.

Edit: sorry for the doom and gloom and merry xmas btw ;)

Dear Alan,

You are so right. Nobody can predict death. I was diagnosed at age 23 myself. 31+ years ago. I'm 54 now. Happy as hell to be alive and enjoying every moment. No doom and gloom heard from you. Merry X-mas. :)

m.
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Offline Hellraiser

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #34 on: December 26, 2013, 12:04:36 AM »
Ok so it is probably good for newly diagnosed folk to read. . . . .but I don't hold it in much regard tbh.

How can anyone possibly predict what age anyone who is just newly diagnosed is expected to live to? I was diagnosed at 23 and started treatment immediately. Tbh I don't expect to live to another 54 years nor would I want to know the effects of 54 years of HAART. Doesn't mean I won't save for my old age, but I don't plan on working until my mid 60s either.

Edit: sorry for the doom and gloom and merry xmas btw ;)

Why worry about 20 years down the road right now?  Enjoy what you have and make the most of it.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #35 on: December 26, 2013, 05:00:15 PM »
Why worry about 20 years down the road right now?
because if you don't worry a little bit, you may be stuck in a hovel eating dog food.  ;) or living at your mom's when you're 50 (hello out there are you fellow LTSers who are in that boat with me. LOL) however, i totally agree with the rest of your sentiment. You gotta make sure you live for and enjoy each day - cause you might not have any more.

like the dichotomy of the anti HIV message ("it's the end of your world" or "it's an easily managed chronic illness"), advice about life has to also be a dual message. You have to live each day like there's no tomorrow, yet always be planning on how you will take care of yourself when tomorrow comes around.

nor would I want to know the effects of 54 years of HAART.
of course, looking at it another way, at 77 you might very well be just as healthy (or unhealthy LOL) as any other 77 year old.  Of course, you may have felt that way since you were in your 50s but hey being alive and feeling old isn't all that bad. ;)

living in a family where my grand, great-grand, and great-great-grand parents lived until their late 90s, I'm afraid, even with those pesky 16 AIDS-years I lived through, I'll probably still be here in my 80s or 90s. Thanks alot AZT and norvir ::) LOL ;D
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline tednlou2

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #36 on: December 26, 2013, 11:58:54 PM »
Below is a pic of my brother's partner's father.  He's Filipino-American.  I guess that's how you say it.  He and I have been sharing our birthday dinners the last few years, since they moved to Louisville.  His birthday is two days after mine.  He will turn 80 on January 6th.  He's had a few heart attacks and heart surgeries.  He is diabetic.  But, he is still pretty active.  He loves going to casinos and can stay out longer at night than I.  I'm ready for bed, while he's still playing. 

I hope to still be as active at 80.  On our annual fall trip to a cabin in the Smokies, we found this new alpine coaster ride, which takes you way into the woods and then you fly down a roller coaster track down the mountain at about 50mph.  We assumed he would stay in the car, while we did it.  However, he insisted he wanted to do it.  I hope to still have that sense of adventure and the health at 80.  If he can do it with all the heart, diabetic, and kidney issues, then I think I should be able to as well. 



Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #37 on: December 27, 2013, 12:14:32 AM »
Ted,

That was one of the most inspiring stories that thunked my heart in a long time.

Complete with the perfect picture no less.

Thank you.

m.
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

Offline mecch

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #38 on: December 27, 2013, 10:25:52 AM »
because if you don't worry a little bit, you may be stuck in a hovel eating dog food.  ;) or living at your mom's when you're 50 (hello out there are you fellow LTSers who are in that boat with me. LOL)

From what I know of your biography, whether you planned or not for the future wouldn't have mattered, considering all the ups and downs of health, love, and finances.

This thread made me remember back tot he 80's and 90's. I had a friend who was obviously proactive at 21 and had life insurance and started saving. When he was 30 and had AIDS, figuring he was on the wane, he sold his life insurance and went to Greece for a good long time, came back to NY and died quickly.
ďFrom each, according to his ability; to each, according to his needĒ 1875 K Marx

Online buginme2

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #39 on: December 27, 2013, 11:03:48 AM »
From what I know of your biography, whether you planned or not for the future wouldn't have mattered, considering all the ups and downs of health, love, and finances.

This thread made me remember back tot he 80's and 90's. I had a friend who was obviously proactive at 21 and had life insurance and started saving. When he was 30 and had AIDS, figuring he was on the wane, he sold his life insurance and went to Greece for a good long time, came back to NY and died quickly.

That reminds me of a story I once saw on 60 minutes.   This couple had purchased someone with HIV's life insurance as an investment back pre 96'.  Then PI's were created and the man who's insurance they purchased didn't die.  I hope they are still waiting for their investment to mature.

Offline mitch777

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Re: Life expectancy. Another report.
« Reply #40 on: December 27, 2013, 11:23:04 AM »
That reminds me of a story I once saw on 60 minutes.   This couple had purchased someone with HIV's life insurance as an investment back pre 96'.  Then PI's were created and the man who's insurance they purchased didn't die.  I hope they are still waiting for their investment to mature.

A friend of mine sold his policy to some "investment" group in the late 80's. He always complained that they periodically "checked in on him" to see if he was still alive. He made good use of the money but in the end the investors profited.
32 years hiv+ (oct. 2013) with a curtsy.

 


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