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Studies in monkeys may be next step in search for HIV cure by powerful infusion.

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geobee:
Also, some of the animals remained UD.  That is ground-breaking.  And this was from one infusion.    Think of what periodic infusions could accomplish.... 

Even if not a cure, it could have widespread therapeutic benefit.  You'd get the shot, get tested regularly, and, if it comes back, get another shot.  And maybe never take ARVs.  Wow.

Dr.Strangelove:
Yep, I also think it looks like a pretty big deal.

The one thing I still don't understand: They've been identifying and experimenting with this kind of broadly neutralizing antibodies for quite a few years (early 90s?). What took them so long to get this result?

Anyway, since these antibodies seem to work much quicker that ART drugs, they might be promising for those few patients that are diagnosed while still undergoing seroconversion. If they kill all of the virus before it forms reservoirs, those patients might get as lucky as the recently cured baby, or at least as lucky as the French patients whose immune system is able to manage the virus without additional drugs.

I hope they'll start human trials soon. Should be a pretty straight forward process. After all, injecting antibodies into a patient is nothing new.


--- Quote ---Still unclear is whether antibodies will also attack latent HIV cells that hide in the body and allow the virus to reappear when treatment stops.
--- End quote ---
I'm more skeptic about that part. I don't see how an antibody could possibly detect a small piece of viral DNA within the human DNA in the nucleus of a latent cell. So, just as with the ART drugs, they only get active once the latent cell wakes up and produces virus particles.
I don't know, perhaps a new shot of those antibodies is needed once every few months to keep the levels up until all reservoirs are depleted (which might take many years).
What do you think?

Tadeys:
"I don't see how an antibody could possibly detect a small piece of viral DNA within the human DNA in the nucleus of a latent cell. So, just as with the ART drugs, they only get active once the latent cell wakes up and produces virus particles.
I don't know, perhaps a new shot of those antibodies is needed once every few months to keep the levels up until all reservoirs are depleted (which might take many years).
What do you think?"

Don't think an ab is going to do anything to a latent cell, but since 3 monkeys have been able to control their VL ala elite controler for up to 8 months means that these ab hit something our current drugs can't hit. Perhaps they hit the so called sanctuaries?

Anyways, from what I have read these ab are more potent then any antivirals we have thus far...and surely without any SE or toxicities...and with a long half-life. Perhaps an infusion/injection every 2/3 months or so will do. Have also read that the pharmaceutical companies REALLY want to start clinical trials. That is algo good.

Saw a video on youtube a few weeks ago were David Baltimore ( Nobel prize winner for discovering reverse transcriptase) was talking about using gene therapy to get muscle cells ( leg, arm?) to start to produce these kinds of ab. If we can get a vector into a muscle cell they can start to produce these ab...so we basically bypass the immune system all together. If this can be done, and if we get the correct Ab, we will all be elite controllers.

David Baltimore has already demonstrated with humanizad rats that this works...he called it immunoprophylaxis I think.

Thoughts?

Dr.Strangelove:
Yep, I agree with all your conclusions. If it works that well in humans we might all become elite controllers.
I don't see any reason why this shouldn't work as effectively in humans as it does in monkeys.

It's the first time in months that I get that excited about a new piece of HIV research.


I just read in another article that currently, it is extremely expensive to produce these kind of antibodies (much more than what the current ART regimes cost per month). So, I am wondering by how much they will be able to lower the costs, once they scale up the production.

GoForIt:
I find it odd that these articles are not on my google news page anymore under HIV....

I can find them through Google search but no longer on the HIV news part of google...hrmm..

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