Quantcast

Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 22, 2014, 04:27:13 PM

Login with username, password and session length


Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 631472
  • Total Topics: 47800
  • Online Today: 279
  • Online Ever: 585
  • (January 07, 2014, 02:31:47 PM)
Users Online

Welcome


Welcome to the POZ/AIDSmeds Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

Privacy Warning:  Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If you are HIV positive and disclose this in our forums, then it is almost the same thing as telling the whole world (or at least the World Wide Web). If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.

  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.

  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.

  • Forums members must behave at all times with respect and honesty. Posting guidelines, including time-out and banning policies, have been established by the moderators of these forums. Click here for “Am I Infected?” posting guidelines. Click here for posting guidelines pertaining to all other POZ/AIDSmeds community forums.

  • We ask all forums members to provide references for health/medical/scientific information they provide, when it is not a personal experience being discussed. Please provide hyperlinks with full URLs or full citations of published works not available via the Internet. Additionally, all forums members must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge.

  • Product advertisement—including links; banners; editorial content; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from POZ.

To change forums navigation language settings, click here (members only), Register now

Para cambiar sus preferencias de los foros en español, haz clic aquí (sólo miembros), Regístrate ahora

Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Author Topic: What Many Don't Know About The McDonalds Hot Coffee Lady  (Read 917 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tednlou2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4,758
What Many Don't Know About The McDonalds Hot Coffee Lady
« on: October 23, 2013, 02:56:13 PM »
This story has been mocked and used as an example of why we need tort reform.  In this very short documentary-style video, from the New York Times, you learn the real story.  You also learn how the media was complicit in the "money-hungry lady" narrative. 

McDonald's coffee was kept so hot, that it would cause 3rd degree burns in seconds.  And, you see very graphic photos of her injuries.  She did not get the $2.9 million figure, that many believe to this day she got.  She got less than $500,000 and McDonald's only lowered their coffee temp by ten degrees. 

So, many may still say it is ridiculous.  The main point is how the media fueled the narrative.  They are notorious for only giving sound bytes.

http://www.upworthy.com/ever-hear-about-the-lady-that-spilled-coffee-on-herself-at-mcdonalds-then-sued-for-millions

Offline bocker3

  • Member
  • Posts: 3,357
  • You gotta enjoy life......
Re: What Many Don't Know About The McDonalds Hot Coffee Lady
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2013, 05:50:20 PM »
This story has been mocked and used as an example of why we need tort reform.  In this very short documentary-style video, from the New York Times, you learn the real story.  You also learn how the media was complicit in the "money-hungry lady" narrative. 

McDonald's coffee was kept so hot, that it would cause 3rd degree burns in seconds.  And, you see very graphic photos of her injuries.  She did not get the $2.9 million figure, that many believe to this day she got.  She got less than $500,000 and McDonald's only lowered their coffee temp by ten degrees. 

So, many may still say it is ridiculous.  The main point is how the media fueled the narrative.  They are notorious for only giving sound bytes.

http://www.upworthy.com/ever-hear-about-the-lady-that-spilled-coffee-on-herself-at-mcdonalds-then-sued-for-millions

So -- the media fueled the story, can't be trusted, only give sound bytes (all of which I agree with), HOWEVER, you take as gospel this "documentary" from the New York Times, which I'm sure had some sound bytes back in the day.  Basically, you are using the media to make your point that media can't be trusted??  I mean this documentary kind of showed a "picture byte" -- those, very brief, graphic pics were not of her injuries -- they were of the grafts used to help heal her injuries.  So -- not really the whole story there either.  Not that I am trying to minimize her injuries -- scalds are horrific burns, because you can't "put it out", you have to wait for the liquid to cool.

I do feel badly that this lady couldn't live this down -- personally, I think the story shows the problems with lawyers and juries more than any problem with her.  Clearly, the judge felt that the jury went beyond reason as he lowered the award from $2.9 million to $650,000 an almost 80% reduction (if my head math is right)  Of course, that assumes one believes this documentary, because after saying how much the judge reduced it to, it says she settled for ~$500,000.  why would you settle a case that you won in court??  Again part of the story seems missing.

Bottomline -- coffee is supposed to be hot -- hot liquid scalds human flesh.  Every accident is not a lawsuit.

Mike
Atripla - Started 12/05
Reyataz/Norvir - Added 6/06
Labs - Pre-Meds
Sep05 T=350/25% VL98,559
Nov05 288/18%  47,564
Current Labs
May2013 691/31% <20

Offline tednlou2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4,758
Re: What Many Don't Know About The McDonalds Hot Coffee Lady
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2013, 01:03:49 AM »
The dollar figures stuck out to me, at first.  But, I assumed when they said it was settled for less than $500,000, instead of what the judge reduced it to, meant McDonald's was threatening to keep appealing unless she accepted less.  I mean, the judge could have lowered it to $100,000 and she could have been waiting for that money for 10 years. 

Your criticism is fair.  They should have been more clear on that, especially when the biggest criticism was how the media didn't tell the whole story.  And, it would have been good for them to show how they (NYT) reported the story back then.  The main point is how the media, including Seinfeld and other shows, turned this woman into someone just trying to get rich.  And, I think most think she got the $2.9 million.  I did.  It does make me wonder how many other things we think happened one way, when there are more details and nuance.  Most of us are not going to deeply research small stories like this; we just take the media's word.  Even with the more consequential stories, many just take their word. 

 


Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.