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Risk of hiv transmission via precum in oral sex

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Newby7553:
Hi , during July 2013 I had flu like symptoms which lasted about 2weeks. I was tested for HIV at the beginning of August and the result was positive, viral load 90,000 but a cd4 count of 760. I started treatment on 15 august , taking truvada and stocrin.

I have two questions ,

1)Assuming the drugs work how long does it usually take to reduce the viral load significantly ? My next blood test is mid October.

2) what is the risk of passing on HIV, at this stage of my infection, if my partner (hiv negative) gives me oral sex and gets small amounts of my precum in his mouth? I don't ejaculate and I am not not even close to ejaculating.

jkinatl2:

--- Quote from: Newby7553 on September 23, 2013, 08:55:03 AM ---Hi , during July 2013 I had flu like symptoms which lasted about 2weeks. I was tested for HIV at the beginning of August and the result was positive, viral load 90,000 but a cd4 count of 760. I started treatment on 15 august , taking truvada and stocrin.

I have two questions ,

1)Assuming the drugs work how long does it usually take to reduce the viral load significantly ? My next blood test is mid October.

2) what is the risk of passing on HIV, at this stage of my infection, if my partner (hiv negative) gives me oral sex and gets small amounts of my precum in his mouth? I don't ejaculate and I am not not even close to ejaculating.

--- End quote ---

The vlanket answer is: essentially zero.

Oral sex (particularly giving fellatio, which you are referencing) has been a hot topic for over a decade in HIV transmission theory.

Unless your partner's oral cavity has been compromised to an alarming degree (think, or Google "meth-mouth") his saliva contains over a dozen elements which render HIV inert and incapable of infecting. This is theoreticsal of course, since it has never been tested nor proven "in the wild."

There have been no fewer than three seeodiscrodant couples' studies performed from the mid-90's to mid 2000's. These studies involved hundreds of couples across two continents, with a wide range of medication choices and viral loads. These couples used condoms for penetrative anal and vsginal sex, but NO barrier protection for any form of oral sex.

And there were absolutely zero infections linked to oral sex. At all.

You really have nothing to worry about in that department. If your are on meds, then that's turning an essentially zero risk into as close to zero as medical science will allow.

If you wear a condom for anal sex you will avoid HIV.

As for how long before your viral load reaches undetectable, that depends on an awful lot of factors, including many dealing with your physiology. It is not unusual to see people drop to undetectable within a month or two. Others take longer.

However, even if the viral load is not undetectable at your firs tpost-med blood draw, it SHOULD have reduced DRAMATICALLY. Which, in my vernacular is more thsn significantly :)

Jeff G:
Hi Newby . There is no need to post the same questions in multiple threads so I removed your other thread so you can discuss your concern in one place . Jk gave you some excellent advice to get started with . Thanks .   

Newby7553:
Thanks for the helpful information, there are so many conflicting opinions on the Internet .......

curious1here:
Like said above, if their mouth is health good as zero chance but if you have sores in your mouth, bleeds increases chances. Also want to mention in majority of men their semen is undetectable but in small percentage of men, it's still detectable even tho undetectable in their blood.

So even if someone is not on meds and have a high load, the chances are slim, but if someone is on meds much, much more difficult.

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