Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Insurance, Benefits Programs & HIV

SSDI Married gay couples .

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2tcells:
ur taxes are taken out before you get paid so there is no taxes to pay or refund to get so you still dont file taxes anyways. but your lucky your both on it they wont let me get married or have a "spose" without lossing my benifits, because a family of 4 can live on one persons full time 8 bucks an hour job so easy if the parents are married... but i guess that makes sence to them since they think one person can live on 600 bucks a month huh.... anyways im pretty sure as long as your not filing for other money you earned and not trying to get any rebates for energy effecient house stuff then there is no reason to file

JR Gabbard:
Hi all!
I'm a little late for the party on this one, but I want to clear up some misinformation.
If you are legally married you have the option, on your federal tax return, to file jointly or separately. You have to run the numbers and figure out which is more financially advantageous for your family.  (That is the same choice opposite-sex married couples have always had.)  You are not required to file jointly.
Your state tax return is a different matter.  If your state of residence does not recognize same-sex marriages, you would have to file separately.  That has the potential of raising some serious complications--some states require your state filing status to match your federal status, for example--so if you're married but your home state doesn't recognize your marriage, you should talk to a local attorney or tax accountant to discuss your options.
2tcells is correct in that there is no requirement to file a tax return (federal) if you don't have taxable income over a certain amount. By the same token, there's no reason not to file.  And some states require a tax return under any circumstances, so be careful.
As for Bob's SSDI, at age 65 it will automatically switch to SS Retirement.  He could check with SSA right now and find out what his benefit amount will be.  It is usually pretty close to the SSDI amount.

Habersham:
I would point out too that a lot of times you are asked to produce a tax return for a certain year.

Unless it is the federal government asking to see it, you don't have to prove that you filed it.

mitch777:

--- Quote from: JR Gabbard on October 11, 2013, 01:23:34 PM ---
As for Bob's SSDI, at age 65 it will automatically switch to SS Retirement.  He could check with SSA right now and find out what his benefit amount will be.  It is usually pretty close to the SSDI amount.

--- End quote ---
I'm hoping JR will come back to clarify this statement. I was under the belief that just because it is called SS Retirement when one turns 65 the actual benefit amount would remain the same as SSDI.

 

bocker3:

--- Quote from: JR Gabbard on October 11, 2013, 01:23:34 PM ---Hi all!
I'm a little late for the party on this one, but I want to clear up some misinformation.
If you are legally married you have the option, on your federal tax return, to file jointly or separately. You have to run the numbers and figure out which is more financially advantageous for your family.  (That is the same choice opposite-sex married couples have always had.)  You are not required to file jointly.

--- End quote ---
While this is true, you can file joint or "married, filing separately".  If married, you can NOT file "single".  Generally (but not always), married, filing separate pays the most tax of all filing statuses.  One should do what is best for their situation, but do NOT file federal taxes as Single, if you are married.

Mike

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