Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Insurance, Benefits Programs & HIV

Traveling, Meds, and Insurance

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Ann:

--- Quote from: coileurs on August 22, 2013, 01:16:20 PM ---
I was under the impression that some european countries have socialist health care, and similar programs that would make paying for HIV meds possible.


--- End quote ---

That "socialist healthcare" is for residents, not people from other countries taking a jolly sabbatical in their country. "Socialist" healthcare isn't free - it's paid for by our taxes and other paid-to-government things, such as national health contributions made through your employment (in the UK).

You can't expect to rock up in a country with national healthcare, work for a few months, and suddenly get free or cheap (basically subsidised by the permanent residents) meds or healthcare.
 

Jeff G:
Damn , and I was gonna visit Amsterdam for a free scrotum reduction . 

coileurs:

--- Quote from: Ann on August 22, 2013, 01:41:24 PM ---That "socialist healthcare" is for residents, not people from other countries taking a jolly sabbatical in their country. "Socialist" healthcare isn't free - it's paid for by our taxes and other paid-to-government things, such as national health contributions made through your employment (in the UK).

You can't expect to rock up in a country with national healthcare, work for a few months, and suddenly get free or cheap (basically subsidised by the permanent residents) meds or healthcare.

--- End quote ---

In my defense, and at the risk of being too political, I'm definitely a proponent of social/national care in America, and everywhere. :) There are programs in the states that help non-residents, and I obligingly pay my taxes without complaints. It may sound naive or juvenile, but I don't have a problem taking advantage of similar programs abroad.

Also I shouldn't have used the term "sabbatical" loosely - in reality I'm exploring the next chapter in my life. Any of the countries I'm traveling to can (and hopefully will) be a place I reside long term/permanently.

jkinatl2:
Yeah, I gotta tell you, unless you are pretty well off and plan on staying that way for the foreseeable future, you would be ill-advised to dump your steady job and insurance with HIV infection/treatment.

THAT is probably one of the hardest adjustments to having HIV these days. Used to be side effects, but now it's having to plan long-term for your treatment and meds.

Like Ann said, most European countries will not offer non-residents free treatment, and treatment in most Western Europan countries rivals the US in full retail cost. You might find a similar drug regimen (not one pill a day, I don't think - not for Complera) in India or the like, but remember: once you sut your ties with an insurance company, you will have a difficult time finding affordable insurance again.

Which means you have to stay relatively wealthy (the twelve grand per year for Complera doesn't cover twice-yearly labs and the like) or remain fairly poor to qualify for drug assistance/Ryan White.

Sorry that this sounds gloomy. But you have it really lucky, having a steady job you are capable of doing and insurance to cover your treatment and meds. If you turn your back on those things, you really do so at your own peril.

*modofied to add:

I notice you responded while I was half-assedly spell-checking.

You really, really need to do your homework regarding HIV and living abroad. Most places with socialized medicine will NOT cheerfully accept HIV positive people as immigrants, due to the estimated cost of treatment and burden on the resources. Now it might well be that you have a special set of skills that would make Western Europe bloodthirsty to get it's/their hands on you. If so, awesome!

But seriiously, think this through as thoroughly as you can. And do your homework. Sadly, the HIV infection is an anchor you have to carry around until the cure, and it will dictate many, many aspects of your professional and personal life.

I'm all for socialized healthcare as well. I don't see it happening in the USA any time soon, though. And other countries (even Canada, the politest country!) do not welcome foreigners with HIV into their healthcare systems gladly.  What you want to do might actually be workable, but it will take meticulous planning and more forethought than I can imagine.

Jeff G:
I'm repeating myself . Think it over a thousand times before making any change to your health care or insurance , especially insurance .

I promise you that will regret it if you don't due your homework . I rarely get into the financial aspects of living with HIV , especially when addressing issues with people coming to terms with an HIV infection because there are sobering realities that must eventually  be faced for all of us on treatment  . Please understand that advise that's handed out in this forum is for others to benefit from as well , so its good to have this discussion even if parts of it don't apply to you , oddly enough , insurance and treatment issues have taken the better part of the last two weeks of my life and it all stems from not so well thought out decisions I made 30 years ago .
 
I think you should continue to try and find ways to make your dreams come true . I have managed to travel quite extensively in my life but I did it with solid planning and meds in tow . You can travel through Europe if you want to but the reality is subsidized medications isn't going to be an option for you .

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