Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Mental Health & HIV

Terrible Social Anxiety/Treatment Ideas

<< < (7/7)

oksikoko:

--- Quote from: RobbyR on June 24, 2013, 09:47:54 PM ---...when I took Zoloft, that stuff made me feel like I was on crack! It made me freaking paranoid and manic as hell.

--- End quote ---

Does your medical plan include psychiatry or are you seeing a GP for this? Sorry if that was stated above and I missed it. If you have the option of a bona fide psychiatrist, as wary as I am, I would recommend you talk to one about this in particular. Psychiatrists don't treat diseases. They treat symptoms. And several very different conditions share a few similar symptoms. If you give the "wrong" drug to the "wrong" person, you can make things much worse. An SSRI should make, for example, a person with anxiety feel calmer (eventually). An SSRI can make, for example, someone who's bipolar, manic. Mania is more than just "feeling wired", so we're all armchair diagnosing here. A single manic episode can potentially destroy your life in ways you may never recover from. Or it can just be an annoyance. It depends on the circumstances, and you do not want to take that chance.

I really don't mean to stir the pot or confuse you during a vulnerable period, so please be sure you're telling all of these things to a psychiatrist if at all possible. It's all relevant and withholding anything, intentionally or unintentionally, from the person writing prescriptions can lead to misdiagnosis with serious results in this psychopharmacological wonderland we inhabit.

BT65:
Benzo's got a "bad wrap" because so many people got strung out on them (me included) and they are extremely difficult to discontinue.  Because of extraneous circumstances I stopped them (plus other meds) I was on cold turkey and I can tell you I've never had such severe withdrawals.  Worse than heroin.  But as I said above, there are those people who are able to tolerate them low-dose, and only take them as needed.  So I wasn't trying to talk you out of it; just trying to let you know the big picture, if you will.

Psychiatrists are trained to treat mental illness, which, to me, are like "brain diseases."  As Oksi said, they are usually better at matching meds to what you're experiencing, than a regular GP.  One thing about psychiatrists is, some persons expect them to spend a long time with them, when in reality most psychiatrists will only see someone for about 5 minutes.  It used to be different long ago, but with more mental illness being realized and more people wanting treatment, things have changed.  Of course years ago mental illness was still stigmatized so more people did not seek treatment. 

If the Paxil is working the way you want it to, then ok.  But if it's causing you a lot of distress, you could always change it out.  I know it sucks to keep changing meds, but there may be a better fit for you with something else.  And I understand, I've changed antidepressants many times.  I'm hoping the regimen I have now will last.  Anyway, good luck and let us know how things are going!

cswalters1:
for RobbyR,

I had an anxiety disorder long before I became positive, which is recently.  It is difficult sometimes, but I am one of those who uses Xanax, my Dr. has no problem prescribing, although, there was a small glitch, because it is contraindicated  for Stribild which I am now on (2 months) my Infectious Disease Dr spoke with my primary and now it is ok.  I use about 5 to 10 a month, so no history of abuse. 

The real issue for me was not the anxiety, but the way my friends react to it, most people don't understand.  They wonder why I wont go to the mall at Christmas, go to concerts, street fairs or anywhere that crowds may occur.  They also don't understand that sometimes, I can't leave my house.  Much of their incredulity comes from the fact that my job is very public, I speak to large crowds.  As part of my work, I have found ways to "hide' inside a work persona which allows me to "get" through it.  After which I need considerable down time.  I know it is rough, I hope you find something that works for you.  Routine helps, my friends know I am not spontaneous, so they have adapted to making definite plans, keeping to them, and not asking me to do things which they know are triggers.

oksikoko:

--- Quote from: cswalters1 on July 15, 2013, 07:03:55 PM ---The real issue for me was not the anxiety, but the way my friends react to it, most people don't understand.  They wonder why I wont go to the mall at Christmas, go to concerts, street fairs or anywhere that crowds may occur.  They also don't understand that sometimes, I can't leave my house.  Much of their incredulity comes from the fact that my job is very public, I speak to large crowds.  As part of my work, I have found ways to "hide' inside a work persona which allows me to "get" through it. 

--- End quote ---

This is an interesting point, cswalters. I always thought of the same idea, not as a persona, per se but rather that when the social structure is so clearly defined (I am teacher, you are student or vice versa), then there's no anxiety at all. But if I have to convince you to like me over a drink? Nope. Nope. Nope.

I used to teach (lectures in front of medium sized groups) at university in Seattle and a high school Siberia. I used to be a singer too, fronting for a very flamboyant pianist, so lots of judging eyes were aimed our way. That's no problem. But I couldn't sit down with you and have coffee and talk one on one for five minutes. That's just too stressful. Of course, some people could talk to each other one on one all day, but would never be able to stand in front of a room full of people and talk without a beta blocker or something.

People who haven't experienced either of these sorts of anxieties have trouble seeing the distinction, I think. I did find that as the one grew (intersocial) it affected the other (performance), though. I think I'd have trouble teaching a class again, for example. Not that anyone would allow me in front of a group of developing minds, haha.

cswalters1:

--- Quote from: oksikoko on July 15, 2013, 07:26:43 PM ---This is an interesting point, cswalters. I always thought of the same idea, not as a persona, per se but rather that when the social structure is so clearly defined (I am teacher, you are student or vice versa), then there's no anxiety at all. But if I have to convince you to like me over a drink? Nope. Nope. Nope.

I used to teach (lectures in front of medium sized groups) at university in Seattle and a high school Siberia. I used to be a singer too, fronting for a very flamboyant pianist, so lots of judging eyes were aimed our way. That's no problem. But I couldn't sit down with you and have coffee and talk one on one for five minutes. That's just too stressful. Of course, some people could talk to each other one on one all day, but would never be able to stand in front of a room full of people and talk without a beta blocker or something.

People who haven't experienced either of these sorts of anxieties have trouble seeing the distinction, I think. I did find that as the one grew (intersocial) it affected the other (performance), though. I think I'd have trouble teaching a class again, for example. Not that anyone would allow me in front of a group of developing minds, haha.

--- End quote ---

You are obviously very intelligent, I am sure you were, and still would be a wonderful teacher.  Isn't it wonderful you can now teach an entire class room without being in the room.. .I telework three days a week, it makes it alot easier on me.  Thanks for the feedback and your extraordinary lens.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

Go to full version