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Author Topic: lipid test  (Read 1714 times)

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Offline sanitex

  • Member
  • Posts: 388
lipid test
« on: June 07, 2013, 05:34:44 AM »



 what can I do to increase my HDL known as the good one? (High-density lipoprotein cholesterol)I've tried different ways to increase it including everyday jogging 8kilometers but still at 35,the normal range is 40-60.
my cholesterol ,LDL,Triglycerides all are in the normal range level.
27/12/07 cd4 20 vl 1million
10/4 /08 cd4 86 vl 63
1/7/08  cd4 186 vl undetectable
16/10/08 cd4 196 vl undet
23/1/09 cd4 248 vl un
10/9/11 cd4 418 vl <40 %22
13/12/11 cd4 410 vl undet 23%
24/2/12 cd4 545 vl undet 26%
on 22/2/12 change truvada to Recovir-EM
due to no stock on Truvada.
10/9/11 cd4 418 vl <40 %22
7/7/12 cd4 359 vl <40 22%
23/8/12 cd4 400 vl <40 23%,
testosterone test 7.5 ng/ml and
thyroid (TSH)1.32 ulu/ml creatinine.eGFR blck 1.5 all fasting test morning.
13/12/2012 cd4 523 24% vl <40
18/3/2013 cd4  513  23% vl <40
regimen ATRIPLA
03/8/2013 cd4 429 22% vl <40
13/11/2013 cd4 455 23% vl <40
Anti-HBs test (quantitative ) Anti-HBs positive
Titer 16.95 mlu/ml <10.00
22/3/14 cd4 396 vl <40 24%
24/7/14 change to Teevir
24/9/14 cd4 517 vl <40 22%

Offline J.R.E.

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,217
  • Joined Dec-2003 Living positive, since 1985.
Re: lipid test
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 03:42:53 PM »

A two page read:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hdl-cholesterol/CL00030

HDL cholesterol: How to boost your 'good' cholesterol
Your cholesterol levels are an important measure of heart health. For HDL cholesterol, also known as your "good" cholesterol, the higher the better. Here's how to boost your HDL.
By Mayo Clinic staff

Although your doctor may have told you to lower your total cholesterol, it's important to raise your high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which is known as the "good" cholesterol. It might sound like a mixed message, but reducing "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and increasing HDL cholesterol may lower your risk of heart disease.
Understanding HDL cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that's found in all of your cells and has several useful functions, including helping to build your body's cells. It's carried through your bloodstream attached to proteins. These proteins are called lipoproteins.

    Low-density lipoproteins. These lipoproteins carry cholesterol throughout your body, delivering it to different organs and tissues. But if your body has more cholesterol than it needs, the excess keeps circulating in your blood. Over time, circulating LDL cholesterol can enter your blood vessel walls and start to build up under the vessel lining. Deposits of LDL cholesterol particles within the vessel walls are called plaques, and they begin to narrow your blood vessels. Eventually, plaques can narrow the vessels to the point of blocking blood flow, causing coronary artery disease. This is why LDL cholesterol is often referred to as "bad" cholesterol.
    High-density lipoproteins. These lipoproteins are often referred to as HDL, or "good," cholesterol. They act as cholesterol scavengers, picking up excess cholesterol in your blood and taking it back to your liver where it's broken down. The higher your HDL level, the less "bad" cholesterol you'll have in your blood.

Just lowering your LDL cholesterol might not be enough for people at high risk of heart disease. Increasing HDL cholesterol also can reduce your risk of heart disease.

Although higher levels of HDL can be helpful in reducing your risk of having a heart attack, researchers caution that you should also consider other risk factors for developing heart disease. It's possible that HDL may not be as helpful for some people as others based on genetics, the size of the HDL particles and other proteins in your blood. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about how increasing your HDL cholesterol might affect you.
Set your target HDL cholesterol level

Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood or millimoles (mmol) per liter (L). When it comes to HDL cholesterol, aim for a higher number.

    At risk                                                 Desirable
Men    Less than 40 mg/dL (1.0 mmol/L)    60 mg/dL (1.6 mmol/L) or above


Women    Less than 50 mg/dL (1.3 mmol/L)    60 mg/dL (1.6 mmol/L) or above

If your HDL cholesterol level falls between the at-risk and desirable levels, you should keep trying to increase your HDL level to reduce your risk of heart disease.

If you don't know your HDL level, ask your doctor for a baseline cholesterol test. If your HDL value isn't within a desirable range, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes to boost your HDL cholesterol.

page 2:

continued:
HDL cholesterol: How to boost your 'good' cholesterol
Make your lifestyle count

Your lifestyle has the single greatest impact on your HDL cholesterol. Even small changes to your daily habits can help you meet your HDL target.

    Don't smoke. If you smoke, quit. Quitting smoking can increase your HDL cholesterol by up to 10 percent. Quitting isn't easy, but you can increase your odds of success by trying more than one strategy at a time. Talk with your doctor about your options for quitting.
    Lose weight. Extra pounds take a toll on HDL cholesterol. If you're overweight, losing even a few pounds can improve your HDL level. For every 6 pounds (2.7 kilograms) you lose, your HDL may increase by 1 mg/dL (0.03 mmol/L). If you focus on becoming more physically active and choosing healthier foods ó two other ways to increase your HDL cholesterol ó you'll likely move toward a healthier weight in the process.
    Get more physical activity. Within two months of starting, frequent aerobic exercise can increase HDL cholesterol by about 5 percent in otherwise healthy sedentary adults. Your best bet for increasing HDL cholesterol is to exercise briskly for 30 minutes five times a week. Examples of brisk, aerobic exercise include walking, running, cycling, swimming, playing basketball and raking leaves ó anything that increases your heart rate. You can also break up your daily activity into three 10-minute segments if you're having difficulty finding time to exercise.

    Choose healthier fats. A healthy diet includes some fat, but there's a limit. In a heart-healthy diet, between 25 and 35 percent of your total daily calories can come from fat ó but saturated fat should account for less than 7 percent of your total daily calories. Avoid foods that contain saturated and trans fats, which raise LDL cholesterol and damage your blood vessels.

    Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats ó found in olive, peanut and canola oils ó tend to improve HDL's anti-inflammatory abilities. Nuts, fish and other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids are other good choices for improving your LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio.
    Drink alcohol only in moderation. Moderate use of alcohol has been linked with higher levels of HDL cholesterol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. If you don't drink alcohol, don't start just to try raising your HDL levels.

Medications and foods that may help

Some medications used to lower LDL cholesterol may also increase HDL cholesterol, including:

    Niacin. Niacin (Niaspan) is usually the best medication to increase HDL cholesterol. Various prescription and over-the-counter preparations are available, but prescription niacin is preferred, as it has the least side effects. Dietary supplements containing niacin that are available over-the-counter are not effective for lowering triglycerides and may damage your liver.

    You may have heard that a large study that examined the effect of niacin to raise HDL cholesterol was stopped early. This study examined how niacin worked when used with statin medications for people who have a history of heart disease. The trial was stopped because no difference was seen between people who took prescription-strength niacin and people who took a placebo. The study also found there may be a small increase in the risk of stroke for people who take niacin to increase their HDL cholesterol level. More research is necessary to see how effective niacin might be compared with other heart disease medications. You shouldn't stop taking niacin unless you get your doctor's OK. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about taking niacin.
    Fibrates. The medications fenofibrate (Lofibra, Tricor) and gemfibrozil (Lopid) can help increase your HDL cholesterol level.
    Statins. Statins block a substance your liver needs to make cholesterol. This reduces cholesterol in your liver cells, which causes your liver to remove cholesterol from your blood. Statins may also help your body reabsorb cholesterol from built-up deposits on your artery walls. Choices include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Altoprev, Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor).

If your doctor prescribes medication to help control your cholesterol, take it as directed while you continue to focus on a healthy lifestyle.

Some foods may have a healthy effect on blood cholesterol levels. Some options include:

    Whole grains, such as oatmeal, oat bran and whole-wheat products
    Nuts, such as walnuts, almonds and brazil nuts
    Plant sterols such as beta-sitosterol and -sitostanol (typically found in margarine spreads such as Promise Activ or Benecol)
    Omega-3 fatty acids, such as fatty fish, fish oil supplements, flaxseeds and flaxseed oil

If you're currently taking medications, talk to your doctor before starting any supplement to avoid potential harmful interactions.
Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

 As of 8/2514,  t-cells are at 402, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 11%

  
 62 years young.

Offline Miss Philicia

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  • Posts: 24,225
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: lipid test
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2013, 03:47:20 PM »
I take two 1000mg fish oil tablets each day and even though I smoke my numbers are fine (But I agree with Ray's statement that it contributes to bad numbers and if you smoke you should consider halting).

Is you doctor all that concerned? I think it's more important that your "total cholesterol" is in range. If all of you other lipid numbers were out of range I would be more pro-active. Personally I'd just go the fish oil tablet route and see if they improve, but give it six months or so to evaluate.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline anniebc

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,942
  • AM member since 2003
Re: lipid test
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2013, 05:16:42 PM »
Avocados are good for keeping the LDL down and good at boosting the HDL, also Krill oil as opposed to ordinary Fish oil is good, it only requires one pill a day and seems to work very well.


 But as already stated the overall *Total* Range is importand, I don't know how you do it in the States but here the norm is 4.5

Aroha
Jan
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Never knock on deaths door..ring the bell and run..he really hates that.

Offline Miss Philicia

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  • Posts: 24,225
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: lipid test
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2013, 07:27:09 AM »
Every time I look for krill oil it's very expensive. But I wasn't aware that you only took half of what you take for fish oil, plus I'm convinced that fish oil makes my farting excessively odious.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline anniebc

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,942
  • AM member since 2003
Re: lipid test
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2013, 07:35:41 AM »
Every time I look for krill oil it's very expensive. But I wasn't aware that you only took half of what you take for fish oil, plus I'm convinced that fish oil makes my farting excessively odious.

It is quite expensive, but how much is the fish oil? does one a day as opposed to 5/6 of the other make it  worth buying Krill?....and it seems to keeps flatulence to a minimum, as to the odour I'm afraid I can't comment on that, I don't seem to have any problems. ;)

Aroha
Jan :-*
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Never knock on deaths door..ring the bell and run..he really hates that.

Offline Miss Philicia

  • Member
  • Posts: 24,225
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: lipid test
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2013, 07:54:13 AM »
I forget what I pay for fish oil, but the bottles have 180 gel caps and my supermarket usually has them as "buy one/get one free" so in essence that's 360 and lasts me almost six months. I think the price is usually around $8, and it's evidently one of only a dozen brands verified by the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention for standards, purity, quality etc. There have been many stories in the press of late about supplements that originate in places like China that have subpar quality issues. The brand is Equaline, and I also use their "Century Mature" multivitamins for people over the age of 50, even though I'm only 48 and 4 months old.

So basically I probably spend $20 annually on fish oil. What do you spend annually on krill? Anytime I look at, say Vitamin Shoppe (a large US chain) a bottle of 60 softgels is ~$25, so that would come to $150 annually, correct? Therefore, you are wasting $130 just so that your farts smell like lilies.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline anniebc

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,942
  • AM member since 2003
Re: lipid test
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2013, 06:20:09 PM »
I buy "Go Healthy" Krill oil 750mg at $NZ69.90 for 100 captules.

Working at the hospital and with the local firemen I need to smell like lilies, someone has to because God knows they don't, so the answer to your question would be yes it is worth it  ;)

Aroha
Jan :-*
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Never knock on deaths door..ring the bell and run..he really hates that.

Offline Miss Philicia

  • Member
  • Posts: 24,225
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: lipid test
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2013, 06:30:19 PM »
So you're spending ten times the amount I do each year, per current exchange rates listed at http://www.oanda.com/. Way to go thrifty girl.

This is why I buy epoisses and you dine on port salut.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline anniebc

  • Member
  • Posts: 5,942
  • AM member since 2003
Re: lipid test
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2013, 07:55:26 PM »
So you're spending ten times the amount I do each year, per current exchange rates listed at http://www.oanda.com/. Way to go thrifty girl.

This is why I buy epoisses and you dine on port salut.

If Port Salut is good enough for the French it's good enough for me...and I don't care where I buy it.  ;)

Aroha
Jan :-*
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Never knock on deaths door..ring the bell and run..he really hates that.

Offline sanitex

  • Member
  • Posts: 388
Re: lipid test
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2013, 04:38:20 AM »

  thanks to you all that made a comment to this issue..!!,though my last test was like this during march .cholesterol 178,LDL 114,Trigly 123,HDL 36.then second test was on 12-5-2013,cholesterol 198,LDL 143,Trigly 89 ,HDL 38. but I thought all those bad result started since I changed to Atripla.
I do regular exercise everday but I still surprising what's going on.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 05:03:32 AM by sanitex »
27/12/07 cd4 20 vl 1million
10/4 /08 cd4 86 vl 63
1/7/08  cd4 186 vl undetectable
16/10/08 cd4 196 vl undet
23/1/09 cd4 248 vl un
10/9/11 cd4 418 vl <40 %22
13/12/11 cd4 410 vl undet 23%
24/2/12 cd4 545 vl undet 26%
on 22/2/12 change truvada to Recovir-EM
due to no stock on Truvada.
10/9/11 cd4 418 vl <40 %22
7/7/12 cd4 359 vl <40 22%
23/8/12 cd4 400 vl <40 23%,
testosterone test 7.5 ng/ml and
thyroid (TSH)1.32 ulu/ml creatinine.eGFR blck 1.5 all fasting test morning.
13/12/2012 cd4 523 24% vl <40
18/3/2013 cd4  513  23% vl <40
regimen ATRIPLA
03/8/2013 cd4 429 22% vl <40
13/11/2013 cd4 455 23% vl <40
Anti-HBs test (quantitative ) Anti-HBs positive
Titer 16.95 mlu/ml <10.00
22/3/14 cd4 396 vl <40 24%
24/7/14 change to Teevir
24/9/14 cd4 517 vl <40 22%

 


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