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Can Resistance Still Occur Even With 100% Adherence?

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Londonguy:
I've read quite a lot about resistance and I'm not completely sure I understand it.

From what I've read, it seems like it works in a similar way to evolution/natural selection.  That is to say that a mutation during the process of reproduction may lead to a variant of the virus that enables it to survive in conditions that the other forms of the virus can not.  Hiv meds practically stop, or at least drastically slow down, the reproduction of the virus, thus limiting the amount of mutations that can conceivably occur.  Have I got this bit right?

However does this not mean that, even with dramatically reduced reproduction, there is still the possibility of a mutation occuring, rendering it resistant to the meds you are currently taking, even if you take the meds every single day.

I find it a little discouraging to think that I could still get resistance even with total adherence.

Moffie65:

--- Quote from: Londonguy on June 06, 2006, 09:30:06 AM ---.................................. there is still the possibility of a mutation occuring, rendering it resistant to the meds you are currently taking, even if you take the meds every single day.

I find it a little discouraging to think that I could still get resistance even with total adherence.

--- End quote ---

Reality bites, doesn't it?

Yes, is the answer you are going to get from me.  I have been on meds since 1994, and my virus has mutated through most of the medications.  I am not totally out of options, but here we are in June of '06, and my virus is again mutating after five full years of stability.  My adherence has been in the 99% range for all of the past 12 years, but the way this virus works, there is little hope that we will be able to STOP the virus mutations in the near term.  I am hopeful that the drug companies will continue to work towards a cure, but hell, at 59; and having lived with this bug since 1983, I am very happy with the fact that I am still here, still stirring the pot, and trying to make a difference in this world.

Here's to coctails.

In Love and Support.

ademas:
Good question, LG.

This past week I've read a few things that sort of threw me for a loop.  The PBS Frontline report states that resistance can occur in as little as 3-5 years, and the quiz on their website says that the meds extend life for an average of eight years.  (Since I just started year 12 on the meds, I found this news a little depressing.)  Then you read on, and they seem to be talking about developing countries, where oftentimes only a few of the cocktail combinations are available.

I'll be watching this thread, because the more I read, the more I don't know what to think.

jack:
I have alway adhered to my drug regimen since I started in 89. I have been undectable only once, about three months ago,but I am resistant to those drugs now. I rarely have a regimen last longer than 1 year. Usually in about 6 months they are history. Everyone is different.

Londonguy:
So it seems like meds, by their nature of slowing down reproduction, also reduce the risk of mutations occuring, but it's still eminently possible.  A little discouraging but I guess I have to think positive and look at the better odds with meds than without.

Can I ask Jack, if your regimens have generally lasted so shortly, what options are available to you at the moment?  It sounds like you would burn through most of the tablets if they last at most a year.

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