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Thoughts On Some Doctors' Biases On Gay/HIV Patients?

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Miss Philicia:

--- Quote from: pittman on March 11, 2013, 09:35:17 PM ---Then they should ask about your current behaviors, not one that could easily be from years or decades past. Also, unless they are treating you for the underlying HIV, then I would feel the need to have them explain the relevance.

--- End quote ---

Like you admitted in your previous post in this thread from last week, you tend to be overly emotional about this. Don't you think that's the actual issue?

pittman:

--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on March 11, 2013, 09:44:26 PM ---Like you admitted in your previous post in this thread from last week, you tend to be overly emotional about this. Don't you think that's the actual issue?

--- End quote ---

Fair question, but no, I don't think so in this case.  In my job, I frequently work with people that are terrible at asking the correct question to uncover the right information.  If the doctor was asking the question of someone newly diagnosed or recently infected, the relevance is more clear cut. However I think that asking about current behaviors would be more useful in other cases. 

So, I think it is reasonable to ask the doctor to explain why they are asking-- it can either help you better understand what they really need it for, OR it will refocus them on what matters if they didn't really need to know.

In my case, I was only ever asked by my primary HIV doctor and his resident when I first started treatment years ago. At the time it seemed like a normal question for what they were seeing me for.  So far, no specialist has ever asked more than how long I have been on treatment and which meds I was taking.

leatherman:
my very first ID doctor in 1992 was serious homophobe. Sadly (though I thoroughly disliked him) the parade of dying patients that came through his office turned him into a raging alcoholic with 8 DUIs and lost privileges at both hospital. He was collateral damage in the HIV epidemic. Now I see a different ID once a year; all the other appts are with the nurse practitioner who is a lesbian, just slightly older than myself, who talks about everything with me and has seen everything on me. lucky lady  ;D


--- Quote from: pittman on March 11, 2013, 09:35:17 PM ---Then they should ask about your current behaviors, not one that could easily be from years or decades past. Also, unless they are treating you for the underlying HIV, then I would feel the need to have them explain the relevance.

--- End quote ---
27 yrs after I was infected I still get asked that question by new doctors, new clinics I go to, the yearly case management review (because it's data they are required to verify for state/federal data collection), when I speak in front of groups, by newbies, by the general public. It's a simple question and by the answer our scientists have data to use, our social workers know where to focus prevention and education messages, and doctors can do better followup on your health (either talking about protective MSM sex, sharing needles, looking at co-factor health issues like HPB, HVC, etc.)

one thing living with AIDS/HIV for decades will do for you is toughen up your skin, that's for sure ;) I suggest you not be so troubled over a question that will be repeated by professionals and the public for decades and decades of your life. ;)

jkinatl2:

--- Quote ---one thing living with AIDS/HIV for decades will do for you is toughen up your skin, that's for sure  I suggest you not be so troubled over a question that will be repeated by professionals and the public for decades and decades of your life.
--- End quote ---

Testify.

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