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Innate Immune Response to HIV

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Jmarksto:
Oks; Great translation and good story!  Like most translations, I have no idea how accurate it is.

JM

Dr.Strangelove:
Great synopsis!

Btw, in case you are still wondering what HeLa cells are: link
It's not really relevant in this context, just a standard cell line that's used in all kinds of research. You may wonder why they use cancer cells for HIV research. The answer is simply because they keep replicating endlessly and that's useful.

oksikoko:

--- Quote from: Dr.Strangelove on February 22, 2013, 06:37:10 AM ---Btw, in case you are still wondering what HeLa cells are: link
It's not really relevant in this context, just a standard cell line that's used in all kinds of research. You may wonder why they use cancer cells for HIV research. The answer is simply because they keep replicating endlessly and that's useful.

--- End quote ---

Thanks! It turns out I know more about HeLa cells than I thought I did but had forgotten the name. I listen to a lot of NPR podcasts, and I knew it would come in handy someday... ;)

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123651144
http://www.npr.org/2011/03/18/134622044/tracing-the-immortal-cells-of-henrietta-lacks

Mishma:
http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v10/n3/full/nmeth.2389.html?WT.ec_id=NMETH-201303

Cas proteins are endonuclease proteins that are a part of the cells innate immune response. They cut and attack foreign DNA that has been inserted into the host genome. Much like Zinc-Finger nucleases, the CRISP system nucleases, use an endonuclease, but rather than using proteins to guide the enzyme to its target this system uses complimentary RNA molecules to its job. As with the ZFN's one is concerned with "off-target" mutations (it cuts where you don't want it to cut) and on target disruptive mutations.

Targeted gene modification can be guided by programmable RNA in bacteria, zebrafish and mammalian cells.

Humble creatures, prokaryotes and viruses, have an illustrious history of providing biologists with molecular tools. Where, after all, would molecular biology—or for that matter, all of genomics—be without restriction endonucleases or DNA polymerases? And, as a recent flurry of papers reporting RNA-guided genome engineering demonstrates, the bacteria are still at it.

The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system is a component of bacterial and archaeal immunity. The CRISPR-associated (Cas) endonuclease cleaves foreign nucleic acids, directed to its target sequence by two small RNAs. In work published last year, researchers showed that the CRISPR-Cas system of Streptococcus pyogenes could be programmed to direct in vitro cleavage of desired target sequences. This raised the possibility that the approach could be used for targeted gene editing in vivo. With an almost startling rapidity, five recently published papers now show that it can.

scotty54:
Your post keeps bringing me back to read more.  Now I know what pathogenisis means.  Amazing research.

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