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generic drugs

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buginme2:

--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on January 15, 2013, 03:07:01 PM ---Actually there was a study on aidsmap several months ago that said this wasn't really the case.

http://www.aidsmap.com/Dosing-frequency-and-number-of-pills-dont-affect-HIV-treatment-outcomes/page/2530789/

--- End quote ---

Maybe that was the article that I read, I know it was recently.  For some reason I thought it did affect adherence not the other way around.  The article that you posted would clearly contradict this paragraph from the science daily article.

"Replacing two of the three branded drugs with generics could significantly reduce costs, the authors note, but such a strategy would also have disadvantages. A more complicated treatment regimen, requiring three daily pills instead of one, increases the risk that some patients will miss doses, leading to the loss of antiretroviral effectiveness called treatment failure."

Isnt it interesting how two articles say exactly the opposite.

I know we have discussed this many times on the forums before.  How do you feel if your insurance compay (or govt insurance) told you you had to switch off your brand named combo (atripla/stribild whatever) and would only pay for individual generics?   There is something about that that doesnt sit well with me.  I just dont like it. 

Miss Philicia:
I don't understand people who complain about the sky high cost of medical care, but then conversely don't want to take generic medication.

buginme2:

--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on January 15, 2013, 03:29:50 PM ---I don't understand people who complain about the sky high cost of medical care, but then conversely don't want to take generic medication.

--- End quote ---

Considering the enormous waste in the US healthcare system and our system of having private, for profit, insurance companies as middle men, I don't understand people that think the way to cut costs is to limit a patients treatment choices.  I can think of numerous ways to cut costs before I would change a patients care.  ;D

Miss Philicia:

--- Quote from: buginme2 on January 15, 2013, 03:35:53 PM ---limit a patients treatment choices. 

--- End quote ---

Where's the limiting? Generic drugs have not been shown to be inferior. You're just making stuff up. Aren't you a lawyer?

buginme2:

--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on January 15, 2013, 03:49:51 PM ---Where's the limiting? Generic drugs have not been shown to be inferior. You're just making stuff up. Aren't you a lawyer?

--- End quote ---

I don't have a problem with generic drugs per se.  I take a generic high blood pressure medication.

However, when you deconstruct a combination therapy to its seperate components that could be argued as a change in treatment.  Also, when only 2 of the 3 medications are available as generic requiring the patient to change the third drug, that is definately a change.  My treatment is being limited by a third party, for profit company whos primary interest is not my health and well being but is instead delivering profits to even more distant shareholders (who really dont have my health and well being as their primary interest).  There is an argument there.   

Until the combination treatment is itself available as generic (such as a generic Atripla pill) then there is an arguement that changing your treamtment due to the wishes of your insurance company, is limiting.


--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on January 15, 2013, 03:49:51 PM --- You're just making stuff up. Aren't you a lawyer?

--- End quote ---

I dont think I am making anything up.  This study conducted by Paul Sax:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0031591

stated that patients who have a lower pill burden (take fewer pills to treat their hiv) may have improved adherence and clinical outcomes. 

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