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Author Topic: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV  (Read 1385 times)

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Offline tednlou2

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  • Posts: 4,602
A new study has found that higher rates of subclinical cardiovascular disease among people with HIV are driven more by traditional risk factors that affect the general population than by HIV-related factors, aidsmap reports. Published in the online edition of the journal AIDS, the paper examined 331 participants who did not have advanced HIV disease and were about to begin antiretroviral treatment. Researchers monitored the participants with ultrasounds of their carotid artery intimamedia thickness (CIMT) and flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in their brachial artery.

The cohort was 89 percent male, 44 percent white and had a median age of 36 years.  About a quarter of participants had received an AIDS diagnosis. Their median CD4 count was 349 and their median viral load about 32,000. 

The researchers found that indicators of cardiovascular disease risk were more strongly associated with aging, body size and lipoprotein levels rather than CD4 count, viral load, inflammatory markers and cytokines. They wrote that their findings should encourage people with HIV to make healthy lifestyle choices involving diet, regular exercise and quitting smoking, all of which can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease.

http://www.poz.com/articles/Cardiovacular_Risk_761_23337.shtml


Offline Common_ground

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  • Posts: 288
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2013, 04:30:40 AM »
Is it just me or havent there been a steady stream of research papers and articles of lately "downplaying" HIV(treated) and its effect on our health, from the top of my head smoking, diet, drugs and other health issues seems to be gaining more importance.
2011 May - Neg.
2012 June CD4:205, 16% VL:2676 Start Truvada/Stocrin
2012 July  CD4:234, 18% VL:88
2012 Sep  CD4:238, 17% VL:UD
2013 Feb  CD4:257, 24% VL:UD -viramune/truvada
2013 May CD4:276, 26% VL:UD

Offline skycee

  • Member
  • Posts: 71
  • oh you are having a bad day? Did you die?
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2013, 07:26:06 AM »
i feel you common ground
Infected September's 2012
Seroconverted October 2012
Elisa test- indeterminate 20th November. 2012
Rapid test - Negative 23th November 2012
Elisa test - Positive 10th December 2012
CD4 - 546, 12th Dec 2012
CD4 600+, VL 6702 26th March 2013

Offline Newguy

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  • Posts: 127
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2013, 12:03:36 PM »
Is it just me or havent there been a steady stream of research papers and articles of lately "downplaying" HIV(treated) and its effect on our health, from the top of my head smoking, diet, drugs and other health issues seems to be gaining more importance.

This is not downplaying HIV infection at all. If anything, research like this should be encouraging for people to make lifestyle changes. There was an article the other day regarding smoking and HIV and that smokers with HIV had a dramatic lower life expectancy. The fact that this was a shock is a a shock itself because we know that smokers without HIV have a dramatic lower life expectancy than smokers without HIV. I have a lot of wonderful  friends who love their smoking, drinking and drugs and I remind them constantly they are no longer 19! Even before I was infected with HIV, if I got hammered on the weekend it would ruin my week. I had to remind myself I too was no longer 19!

Offline Common_ground

  • Member
  • Posts: 288
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2013, 12:12:02 PM »
I think you missed my point but whatever. Sure, lifestyle changes for the better are good.
2011 May - Neg.
2012 June CD4:205, 16% VL:2676 Start Truvada/Stocrin
2012 July  CD4:234, 18% VL:88
2012 Sep  CD4:238, 17% VL:UD
2013 Feb  CD4:257, 24% VL:UD -viramune/truvada
2013 May CD4:276, 26% VL:UD

Offline Newguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 127
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2013, 12:24:44 PM »
Oops I apologize if I did. Sometimes the meaning gets lost in text.

At any rate all this info is def good news. Happy New Year!\


Offline Miss Philicia

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  • Posts: 23,556
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2013, 12:44:03 PM »
There was an article the other day regarding smoking and HIV and that smokers with HIV had a dramatic lower life expectancy.

Do people actually think that it would make for a higher life expectancy? This isn't rocket science. Same with being overweight, not treating long term depression, etc. etc.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline Newguy

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  • Posts: 127
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2013, 12:49:35 PM »
Do people actually think that it would make for a higher life expectancy? This isn't rocket science. Same with being overweight, not treating long term depression, etc. etc.

Yeah really! LOL I wonder how many people they could treat with the money spent on reaching this conclusion?

Happy Near Year Miss Philicia and a great 2013 for you.

On a side note, my father is a hard core smoker and likes to drink and he is 65. My mother is 61 and has never smoked or drank however she is severely obese. Guess who has the worst health? It is kinda of shocking how dangerous an unhealthy diet can be.

Offline Solo_LTSurvivor

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  • Posts: 1,176
  • Twerk Baby Twerk
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2013, 05:56:33 PM »
Is it just me or havent there been a steady stream of research papers and articles of lately "downplaying" HIV(treated) and its effect on our health, from the top of my head smoking, diet, drugs and other health issues seems to be gaining more importance.

That's what happens once something becomes a chronic, manageable condition to live with  ::)
don't equate intelligence with lack of masculinity
Jim Phelps, Mission Impossible
____________________________

Seroconverted: Early 80s
Tested & confirmed what I already knew: early 90s

Current regimen: Atripla. 
Last regimen:  Epzicom, Sustiva (since its inception with NO adverse side effects: no vivid dreams and NONE of the problems people who can't tolerate this drug may experience: color me lucky ::))
Past regimens
Fun stuff (in the past):  HAV/HBV, crypto, shingles, AIDS, PCP

Jan 2012: 818/21%
Apr 2012: 964/22%
Jul. 2012: 890/21%
Oct. 2012: 920/23%

Still UD after all these years

Offline elf

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  • Posts: 582
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2013, 11:51:40 PM »
Many antiHIV meds give people high triglycerides and high cholesterol.
Now, scientists seem to put the blame on HIVers (at least they didn't say: HIVers get high cholesterol and triglycerides because they are into fast food  :o).

I eat healthy and exercise regularly, yet my triglycerides and LDL are borderline (high). I eat sweets or pizza not more than twice a year.

Last year, I got my carotid artery intimamedia thickness (CIMT) scanned and measured (via ultrasound), in an HIV survey, and I got normal values for my age. (The same as in the HIV- control). Maybe because I've been HIV+ for (only) four years, and I've been taking 4g of omega-3 ever since I started taking meds...
My HIV-doctor's comment was ''Hehe, that's because you're young''
[And I'm not young at all. I'm 31 ]
« Last Edit: January 09, 2013, 12:03:40 AM by elf »
Let's have a Kiki!

Offline Mishma

  • Member
  • Posts: 178
    • Marquis de Vauban
Re: Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2013, 12:13:39 AM »
No substitute for a Stress Test. Everyone over 50, especially those with HIV should get one.

I had shortness of breath with no chest pain. I went to the ER and had all the blood work and EKG done along with an ultrasound. Everything was hunky dory but they still ordered a stress test. During it I collapsed due to a loss of pressure. The angiogram the next day found a massive occlusion (80%) of my left main coronary just before it bifurcates. It is called a widowmaker-for obvious reasons. I recieved a double bypass two days later.

This is one my primary care doc missed although to be fair my cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL and no familial history didn't point to CAD. I suspect 20 years of protease inhibitors were a big part of the equation.

 
2016 CD4 25% UD (less than 20). 27+ years positive. Isentress, Truvada, Acyclovir, Clonazepam, Zolpidem, Bupropion, Lisinopril, Pravastatin, Quetiapine, Doxcycline, Testosterone, Suatriptan/Naproxen, Restasis, Dorzolamide, Latanoprost, Asprin, lortab, Levothyroxine, Fioricet, Restasis, Triamclinolone, Nitrostat.

 


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