Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Research News & Studies

Traditional Risk Factors Drive Heart Disease in People with HIV

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Newguy:
Oops I apologize if I did. Sometimes the meaning gets lost in text.

At any rate all this info is def good news. Happy New Year!\

Miss Philicia:

--- Quote from: Newguy on January 03, 2013, 12:03:36 PM ---There was an article the other day regarding smoking and HIV and that smokers with HIV had a dramatic lower life expectancy.

--- End quote ---

Do people actually think that it would make for a higher life expectancy? This isn't rocket science. Same with being overweight, not treating long term depression, etc. etc.

Newguy:

--- Quote from: Miss Philicia on January 03, 2013, 12:44:03 PM ---Do people actually think that it would make for a higher life expectancy? This isn't rocket science. Same with being overweight, not treating long term depression, etc. etc.

--- End quote ---

Yeah really! LOL I wonder how many people they could treat with the money spent on reaching this conclusion?

Happy Near Year Miss Philicia and a great 2013 for you.

On a side note, my father is a hard core smoker and likes to drink and he is 65. My mother is 61 and has never smoked or drank however she is severely obese. Guess who has the worst health? It is kinda of shocking how dangerous an unhealthy diet can be.

Solo_LTSurvivor:

--- Quote from: Common_ground on January 03, 2013, 04:30:40 AM ---Is it just me or havent there been a steady stream of research papers and articles of lately "downplaying" HIV(treated) and its effect on our health, from the top of my head smoking, diet, drugs and other health issues seems to be gaining more importance.

--- End quote ---

That's what happens once something becomes a chronic, manageable condition to live with  ::)

elf:
Many antiHIV meds give people high triglycerides and high cholesterol.
Now, scientists seem to put the blame on HIVers (at least they didn't say: HIVers get high cholesterol and triglycerides because they are into fast food  :o).

I eat healthy and exercise regularly, yet my triglycerides and LDL are borderline (high). I eat sweets or pizza not more than twice a year.

Last year, I got my carotid artery intimamedia thickness (CIMT) scanned and measured (via ultrasound), in an HIV survey, and I got normal values for my age. (The same as in the HIV- control). Maybe because I've been HIV+ for (only) four years, and I've been taking 4g of omega-3 ever since I started taking meds...
My HIV-doctor's comment was ''Hehe, that's because you're young''
[And I'm not young at all. I'm 31 ]

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