Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Mental Health & HIV

Anti-Depressants to Treat Grief...

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RobbyR:
I think anti-depressants definately have a role for certain people who have severe, underlying problems and they can serve to stabilize them and keep them from doing something bad to themselves. I have dealt with anxiety for years, but I'd rather deal with it day by day myself than be medicated and have a ton of nasty side effects on pills. I have also had bouts of depression before, as I'm sure many have. That being said, I think grief is a natural process and people shouldn't run away from it. You have to face up to it, be strong, and deal with it so you can move on. You can't let yourself get consumed by it. I've found that such things are taking a nice quiet walk, or hanging out with friends, or going to the zoo, or art show, always lifts me up if I am in a down mood. And it doesn't come in a bottle!

I think doctors shouldn't be so quick to shove pills in our faces after a 5 minute visit instead of talking to the person and possibly discovering the root of their depression. We have become a pill-hungry culture, doctors no longer get to know their patients, it seems like they just want to throw pills at them and rush on to the next patient, like it's musical chairs. I guess everyone is different, but I think complex, difficult emotions are natural and can make someone stronger if you can overcome them. I know someone who took Valium way back in the day for depression, and now she regrets it and says it made her totally numb and she felt like a zombie. So I think anti-depressants can be a good thing for some people if used correctly, but doctors need to take more time assessing their patients' particular needs & concerns and not just throw pills at everyone. My doc wanted to start me on zoloft, but I sure as hell am not going to take it because I'd rather cope on my own than pop a pill. I think people should learn more coping skills and learn how to deal with their emotions and if that doesn't work medication can be a viable alternative. But pills shouldn't be a go-to stand-alone option for depression.

WillyWump:
I'm with Jeff, Jan and Betty on this.

Especially this...


--- Quote from: BT65 on December 27, 2012, 06:26:25 PM ---
I'm not for covering up feelings and believe psychiatric medication used for depression should be coupled with therapy.

--- End quote ---

Why aren't they recommending therapy for grief? Popping a pill is only pushing "dealing with it" down the road. Several times I've thought about seeking therapy to help me with the grief of my moms death...I would laugh in any doctors face if he said a pill would take care of it.

This is simply a money grab by Big Pharma, and this makes me sick...Drug companies have shown an interest in treating patients who have recently lost a loved one, having sponsored and published the results of at least three trials in which the bereaved were treated with antidepressants, including the Wellbutrin study.

Granted, in some case Medication may be warranted, but overall I think Talk Therapy would be better for Grief.


-W

mecch:

--- Quote from: BT65 on December 27, 2012, 06:26:25 PM ---I am actually on Wellbutrin, have been for some years.  It never covered up the grief I felt for my parents' deaths.  It may have kept me from going over the edge from the depth of the grief. 

I'm not for covering up feelings and believe psychiatric medication used for depression should be coupled with therapy.  I did find it suspicious that the doctors pushing for the use of Wellbutrin have benefitted from the drug company.  But one hand washes the other.

--- End quote ---

That article is mostly about the shady and unfortunate connections between companies, the APA, and research. That article does NOT explain what the research found - what the benefits and experience might be of using antidepressants for deeply depressed people in mourning.

I agree with BT65.  People should be careful not to apply romantic and/or value laden judgements to criticize the use of antidepressants, to judge the drugs themselves.

Who is to say that leveling out or alleviating a depression is a counterproductive to successful grieving?  The effect of the drugs may actually help certain people grieve, and get it together again.  If someone is in a black hole, seeing nothing clearly.  Overcome with sadness or loss, or loss of hope and interest for the future of living.  The drugs might actually help to feel. 

Its quite metaphysical as a question. 

mecch:

--- Quote from: WillyWump on December 27, 2012, 08:45:59 PM ---I'm with Jeff, Jan and Betty on this.

Especially this...

Why aren't they recommending therapy for grief? Popping a pill is only pushing "dealing with it" down the road. Several times I've thought about seeking therapy to help me with the grief of my moms death...I would laugh in any doctors face if he said a pill would take care of it.


--- End quote ---

This is a frequent global judgement and misconception about antidepressants.  In fact many people benefit from antidepressants because they ENABLE the person to deal and feel in the here and now.  And NOT avoid, not be deluded, not be overcome by darkness, pain, anxiety, etc etc etc. 

Jeff G:

--- Quote from: mecch on December 27, 2012, 08:51:28 PM ---This is a frequent global judgement and misconception about antidepressants.  In fact many people benefit from antidepressants because they ENABLE the person to deal and feel in the here and now.  And NOT avoid, not be deluded, not be overcome by darkness, pain, anxiety, etc etc etc.

--- End quote ---

If this is what you got out of my thoughts on the article then I think you may be twisting my words . I thought It was clear enough this article was suggesting treating a person that is grieving with antidepressants because they are anticipating depression that has yet to be seen . It sounded to me like they were saying normal grief and depression are one in the same ... and that sounds a bit to convenient for the ones who would profit from that assumption .

I take antidepressants so believe me when I tell you I know they a a necessity in some cases . My comments were about the article and how the drug company's are actually trying to make a case for antidepressants in situations that doctors have been traditionally reluctant to use antidepressants for ... all for increased sales .

If a doctor and a patient thinks that depression is something other than situational depression , that's a different story .       

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