Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Mental Health & HIV

Anti-Depressants to Treat Grief...

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mecch:
The quote is from Willy, not you.   ::)

Sounds like we can all agree that pharma is out for a profit.

I read the article and it was pretty much about the business and ethics.  Not about the use of drugs to treat depression.

I wouldn't think routinely handing out antidepressants to people in mourning is a good idea.   But in special cases, why not.

My qustion about the quote from willy stands.  I do think that people have this belief that antidepressants "put off" problems. 

Whereas you, BT, and I can attest that the drugs can in fact help people deal with both depression and getting on with life.  So if a doc thinks someone is too far gone in grief, so what if they give drugs a try.

People commenting at the beginning of this thread seemed to be poo pooing that idea.

BT65:

--- Quote from: leatherman on December 27, 2012, 07:40:42 PM ---anyone that has lost a spouse knows that the "healing process" portion of grieving continues on throughout the rest of the surviving spouse's life. Quite simply, losing a spouse is something you never "get over". It's a hurt that never completely heals. It's very different from the grief of losing parents or friends.

--- End quote ---

Well, not quite.  Sometimes people never get over parents deaths, or even friends.  It's been a few years since my parents deaths but I still cry from time to time and frequently at the holiday season.  It depends on the person's experiences with the person who has passed.  In my case, my parents were always there for me no matter how rotten I was during being strung out.  I will never forget that, nor the extra miles they went for me.  I will never get over that.  So to say losing a spouse is "different" than parents because a person never gets over the spouse, is inaccurate.

I can honestly say I do not miss my first husband.  I have more grief for my parents than for him.  Every person's situation is different and you cannot apply your own feelings to all persons.  We all need to be very careful when thinking our own feelings apply to everyone.

leatherman:

--- Quote from: BT65 on December 28, 2012, 10:56:39 AM ---So to say losing a spouse is "different" than parents because a person never gets over the spouse, is inaccurate.

--- End quote ---
losing a spouse is incredibly different. While losing any other relative or friend may be emotionally devastating, it is in no way comparable - especially when those people live in another home of their own.  The person paying the other half of the bills, doing the other half of the chores, sitting across from you at the dinner table, and lying in bed with you every night is gone. (many elderly people often die soon after their spouse) Even if you don't particularly like your spouse at the time of their death, their absence from the house will change how your daily life is lived and handled. A person's life is never MORE changed than when the other half of a couple passes away.

I can understand giving someone drugs to assist them through a rough time; but with so many radical changes happening when a spouse dies (eating habits changes. People often have to move to another home. etc) putting someone onto anti-depressants just because their spouse dies seems like a cop-out to helping that survivor learn to cope with their new daily existence.

Ann:

--- Quote from: leatherman on December 28, 2012, 11:29:45 AM ---
losing a spouse is incredibly different.


--- End quote ---

No two bereavements are exactly alike, they're ALL incredibly different. This isn't a contest of who grieves the most for whom. I still miss my father more than forty years after his death and while it may be different from your own experience, you cannot fathom the depth of my grief or say that losing a life-partner is worse.

It's all subjective and very, very personal. So please don't try to imply that losing a parent is lesser than losing any other loved one in your life. That's what it felt like you were saying - if I got you wrong, so be it.

mecch:

--- Quote from: leatherman on December 28, 2012, 11:29:45 AM ---I can understand giving someone drugs to assist them through a rough time; but with so many radical changes happening when a spouse dies (eating habits changes. People often have to move to another home. etc) putting someone onto anti-depressants just because their spouse dies seems like a cop-out to helping that survivor learn to cope with their new daily existence.

--- End quote ---

Who is advocating that?  The article doesn't go into the details.  Sound like we can all agree that its preferable if someone can manage a loss without drugs but the whole point of therapeutic use of drugs is that a prefessional makes a judgement that a patient isn't managing very well at all, so give the drugs.  So lets make this clear - if a doctor sees that someone isn't managing, why is it a "cop-out" to provide medicine?? 

It sounds like some people really have a value judgement about anti-depressants.  I say, over prescription of lots of kinds of medicine is a problem, not just anti-depressants.  But that doesn't mean that the medicine doesn't work. Anti-depressants work, in my book, in my doctors books.  And some people need anti-depresants.  So big deal. 

Get mad at the money angle, or get mad at doctors who prescribe wrongly or don't followup, etc. etc. 

This misunderstanding about anti-depressants and these value judgements really seems odd in this forum.  It sounds a little puritanical to me.

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