Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Mental Health & HIV

Anti-Depressants to Treat Grief...

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OneTampa:
Interesting article in The Washington Post noting move to use anti-depressants to treat grief, a departure from previous psychiatric guidelines...

Excerpt:

"...It was a simple experiment in healing the bereaved: Twenty-two patients who had recently lost a spouse were given a widely used antidepressant.

The drug, marketed as Wellbutrin, improved “major depressive symptoms occurring shortly after the loss of a loved one,” the report in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry concluded.

When, though, should the bereaved be medicated? For years, the official handbook of psychiatry, issued by the American Psychiatric Association, advised against diagnosing major depression when the distress is “better accounted for by bereavement.” Such grief, experts said, was better left to nature.

But that may be changing..."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/antidepressants-to-treat-grief-psychiatry-panelists-with-ties-to-drug-industry-say-yes/2012/12/26/ca09cde6-3d60-11e2-ae43-cf491b837f7b_story.html

Again, as I noted here on a Boards before, the mental health assistance trend appears to go toward less talk and more pills.

 ::) ::)

Jeff G:
My reaction was a resounding hell no when I read the title of the topic , and after reading the link I'm even more dumbfounded that anyone can think normal grieving is something to be avoided and numbed . I think people rushing to the doc when a loved one dies so they can numb and stuff the feelings of loss some where to be forgotten and not fully expressed and dealt with could lead to problems down the road . I'm certainly not qualified to make the distinction but that's how I feel .   

I'm on an antidepressant to help stabilize my mood and to help with my chronic pain condition , so I'm all for people seeking help and even using medications when needed .

When I was in my 20's I sought help for depression and was lucky enough to find a psychologist who wasn't pill happy , after listening to me for an hour he gave me some advice that has served me well for the rest of my life . He looked me right in the eye and told me that you are depressed because your life sucks , stop living a sucky life and I bet your depression will lift .

He then helped me sort out the things that were making my life a challenge and causing the stress and my depression did ease up once I , with his help improved my life . I'm fortunate I didn't find myself being treated by a doc that wasn't interested in working through my feelings instead of just numbing them .

I want to feel grief for the people I may lose in life just as surely as I want times of happiness and peace . I think that article stinks ... not to mention the drug company's pushing for it just to make a buck . I don't like it .

anniebc:

--- Quote from: jg1962 on December 27, 2012, 02:09:33 PM ---My reaction was a resounding hell no when I read the title of the topic , and after reading the link I'm even more dumbfounded that anyone can think normal grieving is something to be avoided and numbed . I think people rushing to the doc when a loved one dies so they can numb and stuff the feelings of loss some where to be forgotten and not fully expressed and dealt with could lead to problems down the road . I'm certainly not qualified to make the distinction but that's how I feel .   

 

--- End quote ---

I agree 100% with you Jeff, and I believe it can lead to problems down the track if people are medicated in order to suppress their grieve for lost loved ones, to be able to grieve and shed tears, IMHO, is all part of the healing process.

Aroha
Jan :-*

BT65:
I am actually on Wellbutrin, have been for some years.  It never covered up the grief I felt for my parents' deaths.  It may have kept me from going over the edge from the depth of the grief. 

I'm not for covering up feelings and believe psychiatric medication used for depression should be coupled with therapy.  I did find it suspicious that the doctors pushing for the use of Wellbutrin have benefitted from the drug company.  But one hand washes the other.

leatherman:
totally agree too that suppressing this kind of grief with pills is not the way to go

anyone that has lost a spouse knows that the "healing process" portion of grieving continues on throughout the rest of the surviving spouse's life. Quite simply, losing a spouse is something you never "get over". It's a hurt that never completely heals. It's very different from the grief of losing parents or friends. (although it may be similar to the grief over losing a child). To numb that kind of grief, a person would have to remain highly medicated for the rest of their lives (because one never knows when grief and depression over a lost spouse can hit).

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