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How likely am I to infect someone if I am an elite controller?

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emeraldize:
Why don't you write to Bruce Walker at massachusetts general hospital and see what he says (if he replies)?

Fisher:
Jam:

It is highly likely you are very, very fortunate. 

NIH is always looking for individual like you. They would screen you.

While they would pay your expenses, you need to be solid in your time and life to committ.

At the start it is exciting.  In the long run, it is a labor, when disappoinment may arise, and you need to hold strong in your heart.

Should you feel or desire to make yourself available to play a tiny part in the ending of this nightmare for all of us, PM me.

tednlou2:
Can you be considered an elite controller after one year? 

emeraldize:

--- Quote from: Fisher on December 26, 2012, 07:22:09 PM ---Jam:

It is highly likely you are very, very fortunate. 

NIH is always looking for individual like you. They would screen you.

While they would pay your expenses, you need to be solid in your time and life to committ.

At the start it is exciting.  In the long run, it is a labor, when disappoinment may arise, and you need to hold strong in your heart.

Should you feel or desire to make yourself available to play a tiny part in the ending of this nightmare for all of us, PM me.

--- End quote ---

We have lots of previous posts about elite controller research on this site.  NIH and MGH need eligible participants. To describe participation in research as a labor or something for which one "must hold strong" in their heart,to me, reads as somewhat melodramatic. One either wishes to participate or they don't. It is mostly about availability, blood draws and ability to kill waiting room time. One may leave a research study at any time although that is not the desired result.  I would describe it as important to furthering research, fairly compensated and someday, if it factors into cure or prevention, or even if it doesn't, you can feel good about having volunteered.

Fisher:
Maybe I am a drama queen after all. There is still a Felecia inside of me ready to scream out of me, after all these years!

It's just that you go back and back. You hear little in regards of advancement.  However, the primary researcher at NIH I am convinced has full heart (hrdra) and determination. 

Your deal with a bit of bureaucratic structure. Always a bit annoying.

I do not know if I will continue to be part of the LTNP cohort. Highly unlikely, as I am now on meds.

Despite, any chance that myself or anyone of us, to play a "tiny" or "major" role in the ending of this nightmare for all of us . . . for me, at least, a no brainer, no choice at all . . . to do what is right and necessary, whatever the personal opinions, inconviences, or annoyances.





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