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common mindset?

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wolfter:
I've been enjoying spending time with my nephew while he's home for Christmas vacation.  He chooses to spend more time with me than his mother. ;D  I've always admired him and continue to do so.  He came out in highschool which I tried to convince him not to.  He suffered hell for it but he chooses to live life honestly.

He's graduating from College in May and is moving to LA as he already has a job lined up.  We were having a discussion about everything and I brought up the entire safe sex thing again.  I've been poz longer than he has been alive and he has witnessed my battles. 

As we discussed it all, he indicated that he's known at least 6 school mates who have tested positive.  I allowed him to elaborate on the mindset of this younger generation.  So many believe the fallacy that this virus is no big deal.  A few pills and you'll live a regular life.  Kinda like what herpies was in prior generations.

I am so disappointed to hear this.  But I guess the upside if there is one, that the stigma has lessened to point where disclosure isn't an issue.  I'm just glad my nephew has witnessed the devastation first hand.  He's very similar to me in that he prefers relationships instead of being a sex hound.  He has heeded my cautions about always being responsible for his own sexual health.   

This isn't new news, but to hear it firsthand is disheartening.

weasel:


     Wofter  , i hope your  nephew has a great life .

    It sounds like he is on the way    ;)


                                                        Weasel

texaninnyc87:
As a younger person I have a few things to say about this. Firstly, ever since I was diagnosed EVERYONE (doctors, social workers, counselors, people on here) have told me that basically if you start treatment early HIV is something that you can live a completely normal life with, apart from daily pills and frequent doctors visits. I can't imagine what it must have been like in the pre HAART days and I know that all of that isn't something that can be forgotten, but isn't it possible that this "common mindset" is actually a realistic viewpoint? the reality is, that the way people deal with HIV has changed and the younger generation of gay men don't have positive friends that are very sick and likely wont ever with the continuing advances in HIV therapy. i'm definitely not saying that the virus shouldn't be taken seriously or anything. It's sad that because HIV has become so treatable people dont view it as a real threat. What I am saying is that with times changing and advances being made it is impossible to avoid an inevitable cultural shift on the way people view HIV. A friend of mine recently wrote an article that the Huffington Post picked up about what it's like to be young and positive and got a lot of shit from older generation positive people basically saying what you've just said. Again, i cant imagine all the struggles long term survivors have faced but i think there is a different kind of reality that HIV presents to people who are newly diagnosed that may be hard for some people to accept.

LoboDog:
Hey Tex...

You are right... HIV is very treatable now a days and very few people are suffering from complications until they are much older. But there are a couple of issues us old fogies would like the younger generation to realize...

1. This disease is obscenely expensive to treat. A person does well who has insurance, but what if you lose your insurance, switch jobs, want to move to a different state and deal with ADAP...

2. The younger generation has a higher propensity to go off the deep end with drugs. A person who is using is not overly concerned with taking meds...

3. The older generation has usually come across some challenge that makes us realize that we are not invincible. HIV, though treatable, is a chink in your armor.

I am disheartened by the blase attitude towards the disease. I get down right furious when I hear of guys that go out and try to get it or when I hear of guys that knowingly infect others even if it is consensual.

leatherman:

--- Quote from: texaninnyc87 on December 24, 2012, 03:01:26 PM ---but i think there is a different kind of reality that HIV presents to people who are newly diagnosed that may be hard for some people to accept.

--- End quote ---
the thing that bothers me about this newer view of the epidemic is that it's all contingent on HAVING the meds. Living in a state that had a waiting list for several years - and had people DIE, both in 2006 and 2011, while waiting on this list - I just think this new view doesn't take into account the reality of acquiring and maintaining access to meds. HIV is still the same terminal disease it's always been. Without meds, it still kills the same way in did in the 80s and 90s. It's only the meds that have made things change. Without the meds, people still die.


--- Quote from: texaninnyc87 on December 24, 2012, 03:01:26 PM ---but isn't it possible that this "common mindset" is actually a realistic viewpoint?.

--- End quote ---
My state currently has a 54% death rate from HIV (from 2006 - 2011) - and that's with meds. Because people often go untested for so long, go untreated too long, and have barriers to access meds, while HIV no longer has a death rate of 95+%, the realistic viewpoint is that nearly half of the people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS are still dying in SC.


--- Quote from: texaninnyc87 on December 24, 2012, 03:01:26 PM --- the reality is, that the way people deal with HIV has changed and the younger generation of gay men don't have positive friends that are very sick and likely wont ever with the continuing advances in HIV therapy.

--- End quote ---
that's the other part of the "reality" that isn't the reality in SC. here it isn't a disease of only gay men. 47% of all new cases are STRAIGHT, and mostly African-American, with the vast majority of those people being women.

The unrealistic viewpoint of seeing HIV as a disease of gay men who infrequently die because there are plenty of meds available to control it is exactly why the reality in many Southern states is that HIV is a disease killing off over half of the HIV-infected Black, straight women.

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