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We've gone over the fiscal cliff early

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BT65:

--- Quote from: jg1962 on December 09, 2012, 08:27:29 PM ---Thanks every body , when I get my cement  pond in the back yard yall can come swimming anytime yall want .

--- End quote ---

Jeff, I can understand you.  Of course this could be because I've lived in Alabama and got used to the accent. 

At work, one of the clients is from Mississippi.  Hardly anyone can understand him, so I'm the translator.

tednlou2:
I've always found it interesting that British and Irish singers sound so much like Americans, but when they speak, you can barely understand many of them.  Even the ones you can understand, the thick accent is there.  They sing in a U.S. dialect to appeal to Americans? 

spacebarsux:

--- Quote from: tednlou2 on December 13, 2012, 03:20:01 PM ---I've always found it interesting that British and Irish singers sound so much like Americans, but when they speak, you can barely understand many of them.  Even the ones you can understand, the thick accent is there.  They sing in a U.S. dialect to appeal to Americans?

--- End quote ---

Thats largely because everyone loses a major chunk of their real accent when singing. Every accent has a unique inflection, rhythm and tonal quality. And this goes awry in adjusting to the tune or music of the song.

Try singing along to Adele or Coldplay and youd sound pretty much like them. In everyday speech most North Americans, unlike most English (there are exceptions though), have rhotic accents- i.e. you distinctly pronounce the r sound in words ending with r such as car, far, star, lover etc, whereas most English would say ca-ah, fa-ah, lov-eh, and would not usually pronounce the r where it falls at the end of the word and is preceded by a vowel. When singing this major difference between the accents is not noticeable as many Americans singers would be forced to pronounce the r as the English pronounce it (or rather dont pronounce it) or vice versa, depending on the music piece. The difference between accents is much more apparent in rap. 

skeebo1969:

--- Quote from: tednlou2 on December 13, 2012, 03:20:01 PM ---I've always found it interesting that British and Irish singers sound so much like Americans, but when they speak, you can barely understand many of them.  Even the ones you can understand, the thick accent is there.  They sing in a U.S. dialect to appeal to Americans?

--- End quote ---

Song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Pgm0ARFkB4

Interview: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdBUv_c7u8c

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