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Recently diagnosed, VL of 47 then 43, elite controller?

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Souledout:
Oh I was freaked out, believe me! But it happened at a good time for me - literally the day before I had taken stock of my life and noted how damn good it was. I've just bought a house, got a great man, got a new job, got the most amazing set of friends and the most amazing social life. I was also in the process of setting up a business which was really stressful and hard work but gave me something to focus on - I wasnt about to let this fucking virus ruin my life. With the support of my friends and partner I got through the worst of it unscathed. It actually was the catalyst for the word love to be spoken between us for the first time (through tear stained eyes and sobs).

Pretty soon I realised it wasn't a death sentence - the news could be MUCH worse. I kinda had a second chance at life. Colours went from watercolour to lush oils. I was seeing beauty where before I'd have hurried along head down. I swear I've cried more times at the love and support I've received from friends than from the diagnosis itself.

I've got my name down for counselling (not that I think I need it but it can't hurt) and made contact with a local HIV charity just in case I need them. I reckon my doctors are top notch (don't believe all that you guys hear about our nhs - it's brilliant at times). When I'm in next I'll talk to them more about the million questions I'm amassing.

madbrain:

--- Quote from: Souledout on October 30, 2012, 10:02:11 AM ---Can I ask why you went on therapy? Did your numbers change dramatically? I'm still kind of concerned that I could sky rocket (my doctor isn't even sure that I've  seroconverted yet - I really hope this is not the case.)

--- End quote ---

I went on therapy because I had some chronic fatigue. It had nothing to do with my numbers. My numbers were the best they ever had been at the time  I went on therapy. My VL went undetectable 2 weeks from the time I ingested my first pills.

If you are testing positive for HIV on the antibody test, and you have a viral load, then you have seroconverted.


--- Quote ---I've just been to the doctors and checked my notes, I thought I had everything worked out and knew when I was infected but the seroconversion symptoms I had displayed were months before my last test. To say I'm confused... Unless that was a false negative. Who knows.

--- End quote ---

I think it was likely  a false negative.

I had some illness that in retrospect looks like seroconversion illness, in early April 2006. I still tested negative on the antibody test in late june 2006. My next test was in october 2006 and positive.

Unfortunately it appears that some  viremic/elite controllers may be experiencing false negatives, or rather delayed positive test results. At least that's my theory. There is just not enough data on it yet to prove one way or the other. But your experience mirrors mine.

It doesn't help much to try to figure out what happened in the past exactly though, you have to think about the future.


--- Quote ---Thanks for the link, I'm on it now.

--- End quote ---

You are welcome. It's an unusual situation to be in. Only a small percentage are viremic or elite controllers.
You will find many people who chose not to go on therapy, including the founder of the site. And many others that did, such as myself.
Take your time making that decision. It took me 3 years to come to terms with it. I wish I had taken less time.

madbrain:

--- Quote from: Souledout on October 30, 2012, 02:07:40 PM ---Oh I was freaked out, believe me! But it happened at a good time for me - literally the day before I had taken stock of my life and noted how damn good it was. I've just bought a house, got a great man, got a new job, got the most amazing set of friends and the most amazing social life. I was also in the process of setting up a business which was really stressful and hard work but gave me something to focus on - I wasnt about to let this fucking virus ruin my life. With the support of my friends and partner I got through the worst of it unscathed. It actually was the catalyst for the word love to be spoken between us for the first time (through tear stained eyes and sobs).

Pretty soon I realised it wasn't a death sentence - the news could be MUCH worse. I kinda had a second chance at life. Colours went from watercolour to lush oils. I was seeing beauty where before I'd have hurried along head down. I swear I've cried more times at the love and support I've received from friends than from the diagnosis itself.

I've got my name down for counselling (not that I think I need it but it can't hurt) and made contact with a local HIV charity just in case I need them. I reckon my doctors are top notch (don't believe all that you guys hear about our nhs - it's brilliant at times). When I'm in next I'll talk to them more about the million questions I'm amassing.

--- End quote ---

You seem to be adjusting exceptionally well. I have never heard anyone say that there was a "good time" for testing positive.

I read so many research papers and learned way too much about the virus in my first year. If you can do it without getting depressed, go for it. I certainly could not and at least one year of my life got essentially wasted after my diagnosis. My partner also tested positive and it's pretty clear that he got it from me. That was really a very trying time. I am glad that first year is behind, but still not everything has been dandy since.

Has your lover been retested since your diagnosis?

Counselling is a very good idea and you should use all resources available to you as you need them. Maybe join a support group if there is one near you.

lincoln6echo:

--- Quote from: friskyguy on October 30, 2012, 12:41:16 PM --- Also ealier commencement of meds would assist in reducing inflamation in your body and therefore reduce those nasty complications caused my constant low levels of virus.

--- End quote ---

Hey friskyguy. When you refer to complications being caused by low levels of virus, what are you referring to?

I'm newly infected and learning as I go along so curious what that means.

Thanks.
Lincoln.

friskyguy:
Hi, the low level of virus reference was to the OP and his present low level of virus. Here are some articles that I have for your further interest.

Hiv causes increased immune activation in your body as your immune system ramps up and attempts to battle the virus. This is not good as the increased immune activation increases inflammation in the body which can elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), clotting and stroke, ie increased risk of mortality and may cause damage on a cellular level.
Good article on inflammation here;
http://thebody.com/content/treat/art57904.html

When inflammation becomes chronic (from uncontrolled HIV), vital organ systems such as blood vessels, heart, kidneys and liver can become damaged which can increase risk of serious health problems.
http://aidsmeds.com/articles/hiv_inflammation_fibrinogen_1667_19261.shtml
http://www.aidsmap.com/Accelerated-hardening-of-the-arteries-in-patients-with-HIV-traditional-risks-the-main-cause/page/2030903/

Meds can reduce inflammation by controlling the level of virus to UD assisting the immune system control the virus and allowing your immune system not to be on a heighten state of alert and therefore strong enough to fight other pathogens and disease that might come your way.
http://hivandhepatitis.com/2009icr/croi/pdf/3McComsey.pdf

Low dose aspirin can help lower CVD risk from inflammation by thinning the blood.
http://aidsmeds.com/articles/hiv_aspirin_heart_1667_18917.shtml

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