Quantcast

Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 29, 2014, 06:29:11 PM

Login with username, password and session length


Members
  • Total Members: 23344
  • Latest: TML1991
Stats
  • Total Posts: 636587
  • Total Topics: 48316
  • Online Today: 195
  • Online Ever: 585
  • (January 07, 2014, 02:31:47 PM)
Users Online
Users: 6
Guests: 152
Total: 158

Welcome


Welcome to the POZ/AIDSmeds Community Forums, a round-the-clock discussion area for people with HIV/AIDS, their friends/family/caregivers, and others concerned about HIV/AIDS.  Click on the links below to browse our various forums; scroll down for a glance at the most recent posts; or join in the conversation yourself by registering on the left side of this page.

Privacy Warning:  Please realize that these forums are open to all, and are fully searchable via Google and other search engines. If you are HIV positive and disclose this in our forums, then it is almost the same thing as telling the whole world (or at least the World Wide Web). If this concerns you, then do not use a username or avatar that are self-identifying in any way. We do not allow the deletion of anything you post in these forums, so think before you post.

  • The information shared in these forums, by moderators and members, is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own physician.

  • All members of these forums are, by default, not considered to be licensed medical providers. If otherwise, users must clearly define themselves as such.

  • Forums members must behave at all times with respect and honesty. Posting guidelines, including time-out and banning policies, have been established by the moderators of these forums. Click here for “Am I Infected?” posting guidelines. Click here for posting guidelines pertaining to all other POZ/AIDSmeds community forums.

  • We ask all forums members to provide references for health/medical/scientific information they provide, when it is not a personal experience being discussed. Please provide hyperlinks with full URLs or full citations of published works not available via the Internet. Additionally, all forums members must post information which are true and correct to their knowledge.

  • Product advertisement—including links; banners; editorial content; and clinical trial, study or survey participation—is strictly prohibited by forums members unless permission has been secured from POZ.

To change forums navigation language settings, click here (members only), Register now

Para cambiar sus preferencias de los foros en español, haz clic aquí (sólo miembros), Regístrate ahora

Finished Reading This? You can collapse this or any other box on this page by clicking the symbol in each box.

Author Topic: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?  (Read 4827 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tednlou2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4,836
Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« on: September 01, 2012, 01:07:11 AM »
If you're someone who has your basic depression with anxiety, is there any benefit of taking on another doctor (psychiatrist)?  I mean, I have a very qualified therapist.  And, I have been getting my depression med from my family doctor. 

I've never been to a psychiatrist.  Just curious whether they are suppose to be better?  I have no doubt they know more about meds than family docs.  But, I'm just on a basic SSRI.  I feel very comfortable with my therapist.  Psychiatrists aren't running special brain chemical labs, are they?  Right now, I would only see that as the only benefit--being able to actually document an imbalance.  And, I don't even think that is done widely.  I remember seeing a segment on 60 minutes or somewhere where some research center tested someone for low serotonin and other chemicals.  But, I don't think that is done at large.  Actually, I'm not sure whether testing ever came out of the research area.     

I guess I'm asking, because several people have told me a psychiatrist is really who patients with depression should be seeing.  Do you see a psychiatrist or a therapist?  Do you think there's much difference?     

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2012, 06:02:39 PM »
If you're someone who has your basic depression with anxiety, is there any benefit of taking on another doctor (psychiatrist)?  I mean, I have a very qualified therapist.  And, I have been getting my depression med from my family doctor. 

I've never been to a psychiatrist.  Just curious whether they are suppose to be better?  I have no doubt they know more about meds than family docs.  But, I'm just on a basic SSRI.  I feel very comfortable with my therapist.  Psychiatrists aren't running special brain chemical labs, are they?  Right now, I would only see that as the only benefit--being able to actually document an imbalance.  And, I don't even think that is done widely.  I remember seeing a segment on 60 minutes or somewhere where some research center tested someone for low serotonin and other chemicals.  But, I don't think that is done at large.  Actually, I'm not sure whether testing ever came out of the research area.     

I guess I'm asking, because several people have told me a psychiatrist is really who patients with depression should be seeing.  Do you see a psychiatrist or a therapist?  Do you think there's much difference?     

Therapists usually cannot write any prescription, psychiatrists can. That's pretty much the main difference. The last professional I went to was a therapist...saw him for 2 years and it was incredibly helpful, I never had a problem with depression ever again.

Ted if you feel your therapist is being helpful then why dwell on it? Did he ever tell you he feels you suffer from any kind of imbalance?

Offline mecch

  • Member
  • Posts: 11,492
  • red pill? or blue pill?
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2012, 07:35:38 PM »
If you're someone who has your basic depression with anxiety, is there any benefit of taking on another doctor (psychiatrist)?  I mean, I have a very qualified therapist.  And, I have been getting my depression med from my family doctor. 

I've never been to a psychiatrist.  Just curious whether they are suppose to be better?  I have no doubt they know more about meds than family docs.  But, I'm just on a basic SSRI.  I feel very comfortable with my therapist.  Psychiatrists aren't running special brain chemical labs, are they?  Right now, I would only see that as the only benefit--being able to actually document an imbalance.  And, I don't even think that is done widely.  I remember seeing a segment on 60 minutes or somewhere where some research center tested someone for low serotonin and other chemicals.  But, I don't think that is done at large.  Actually, I'm not sure whether testing ever came out of the research area.     

I guess I'm asking, because several people have told me a psychiatrist is really who patients with depression should be seeing.  Do you see a psychiatrist or a therapist?  Do you think there's much difference?     

Of course the two jobs and trainings are different. 

If you are content with your therapist you got it good.  People content with their psychiatrist also have it good. 


Does your therapist have any imput on how your SSRI's are going?  Do you feel that is lacking?' Do you want some sort of body-mind insight that the therapist is not providing.  If so, a psychiatrist might be interesting but only if you can have talk therapy with the shrink and he/she takes on the whole project.

My psychiatrist has put me through a couple different cycles of different drugs that a non-MD therapist probably wouldn't be too invested in.  These include, SSRI, sleeping pills, attention deficit medications, and anti-anxiety medications. So my experience is that the psychiatrist can lead you faster into, though, and done with, the utility and inutility of these drugs as part of your mental health.  That is one of their specialties...  Seeing if drugs help and when they are no longer needed.

But if you are good on your SSRI and good with your therapist, you have it good.

My experience also is that the ID and family doctor take calls and consult with my psychiatrist because they are all doctors and these different "hierarchies" are important in Swiss culture.  So the psychiatrist is not out of the loop.

« Last Edit: September 01, 2012, 07:38:22 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2012, 11:44:26 AM »
Of course the two jobs and trainings are different. 

If you are content with your therapist you got it good.  People content with their psychiatrist also have it good. 


Does your therapist have any imput on how your SSRI's are going?  Do you feel that is lacking?' Do you want some sort of body-mind insight that the therapist is not providing.  If so, a psychiatrist might be interesting but only if you can have talk therapy with the shrink and he/she takes on the whole project.

My psychiatrist has put me through a couple different cycles of different drugs that a non-MD therapist probably wouldn't be too invested in.  These include, SSRI, sleeping pills, attention deficit medications, and anti-anxiety medications. So my experience is that the psychiatrist can lead you faster into, though, and done with, the utility and inutility of these drugs as part of your mental health.  That is one of their specialties...  Seeing if drugs help and when they are no longer needed.

But if you are good on your SSRI and good with your therapist, you have it good.

My experience also is that the ID and family doctor take calls and consult with my psychiatrist because they are all doctors and these different "hierarchies" are important in Swiss culture.  So the psychiatrist is not out of the loop.

I do understand that some people actually need medicine to function properly in their everyday life. However, I get scared sometimes at the amount of medicine that Americans take these days. You have 2 sessions with the psychiatrist and he's already prescribing you pills instead of trying to take a, let's say, old-fashioned approach and see if you can improve without any sort of medicine.

I was prone to depressions when I was younger...and by depression I mean barely being able to get out of bed, not eating, not showering, not socializing...but it was all self-esteem issues that can occur when you are younger, especially if you are gay. My therapist cleared some of my family ghosts that were haunting me and helped me build up my self-esteem. Life took care of the rest. These days I may get sad sometimes but it never lasts long. Just hope I continue like this until I die.

Offline mecch

  • Member
  • Posts: 11,492
  • red pill? or blue pill?
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2012, 12:36:31 PM »
I am American but treated in Switzerland.  Every shrink is different but the great thing about talk therapy with a shrink is that there is no necessary wharehousing of a patient on psychoactive drugs.  Rather, the drugs are used just like a GP/MD uses his/her arsenal of drugs. 

ROCKIN - the "old fashioned approach" is, in my opinion a silly and simplistic layman's stereotype --- if it ignores today's drugs and today's knowledge about mental health.  The "old fashioned approach" sounds like a person has to suffer horribly. 

In contrast, someone in an acute phase of mental sickness who is treated by a good and comprehensive psychiatrist gets, through drugs, immediate relief from the pain, and protection from potential injury, and REAL or potential life dysfunction caused by mental illness.  The drugs are used when they show benefits, and discontinued when no longer needed. 

The drugs combined with talk therapy can cure mental illnesses and in the meantime, keep you working, keep your daily life bearable. 

Not to mention that a psychiatrist can identify mental illnesses or psychiatric conditions that simply MUST be treated with drugs.  Pipolar. Mania. Severe Depression.  Crippling anxiety.  Dramatic PTSD. Attention Deficit. And so on and so on.   Etc etc etc.   There is no "old fashioned way".

Yeah maybe people get too many drugs, Rockin, but people on unnecessary drugs or people who are not correctly monitored is a bad scanario, not the state of the art.

These days and age, if you get a talk therapist of any kind who helps you, and an MD prescribing drugs that are helpful, well that's half the battle. 

But don't throw out the value of a good shrink, Rockin. 
« Last Edit: September 02, 2012, 05:54:18 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline BT65

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 9,912
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2012, 04:59:04 PM »
Ted, if you're doing good with the therapist and family dr prescribing your anti-depressant, then why add another dr into the mix?  I would think if you feel you're in a kind of "mental crisis" sort of state, then getting into a psychiatrist would be warranted.

Actually, unless the depression is accompanied by mania, schizophrenia, things like that, I believe combining therapy with an anti-depressant that a family dr can prescribe is good enough.  I've been on the same anti-depressant for a couple of years (after cycling through many) and my family dr prescribes it.  I used to see a therapist, who was extremely apt in assisting me with issues I was experiencing at the time. 

Honestly, if I don't have to add another dr, I certainly won't.
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline drewm

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,084
  • I have a sling and a dungeon :-P
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2012, 05:57:44 PM »
If you're someone who has your basic depression with anxiety, is there any benefit of taking on another doctor (psychiatrist)?  I mean, I have a very qualified therapist.  And, I have been getting my depression med from my family doctor. 

I've never been to a psychiatrist.  Just curious whether they are suppose to be better?  I have no doubt they know more about meds than family docs.  But, I'm just on a basic SSRI.  I feel very comfortable with my therapist.  Psychiatrists aren't running special brain chemical labs, are they?  Right now, I would only see that as the only benefit--being able to actually document an imbalance.  And, I don't even think that is done widely.  I remember seeing a segment on 60 minutes or somewhere where some research center tested someone for low serotonin and other chemicals.  But, I don't think that is done at large.  Actually, I'm not sure whether testing ever came out of the research area.     

I guess I'm asking, because several people have told me a psychiatrist is really who patients with depression should be seeing.  Do you see a psychiatrist or a therapist?  Do you think there's much difference?     

Ted, I see a psychiatrist. As others have suggested, the difference is really that the psychiatrist can write scripts and therapists cannot. If your therapist is working with your doc (as far as meds are concerned) I don't, personally, see a reason to switch.
Diagnosed in  May of 2010 with teh AIDS.

PCP Pneumonia . CD4 8 . VL 500,000

ATRIPLA - VALTREX -  FLUOXETINE - FENOFIBRATE


Numbers consistent since 12/2010 - VL has remained undetectable and CD4 is anywhere from 275-325

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2012, 10:14:28 PM »
I am American but treated in Switzerland.  Every shrink is different but the great thing about talk therapy with a shrink is that there is no necessary wharehousing of a patient on psychoactive drugs.  Rather, the drugs are used just like a GP/MD uses his/her arsenal of drugs. 

ROCKIN - the "old fashioned approach" is, in my opinion a silly and simplistic layman's stereotype --- if it ignores today's drugs and today's knowledge about mental health.  The "old fashioned approach" sounds like a person has to suffer horribly. 

In contrast, someone in an acute phase of mental sickness who is treated by a good and comprehensive psychiatrist gets, through drugs, immediate relief from the pain, and protection from potential injury, and REAL or potential life dysfunction caused by mental illness.  The drugs are used when they show benefits, and discontinued when no longer needed. 

The drugs combined with talk therapy can cure mental illnesses and in the meantime, keep you working, keep your daily life bearable. 

Not to mention that a psychiatrist can identify mental illnesses or psychiatric conditions that simply MUST be treated with drugs.  Pipolar. Mania. Severe Depression.  Crippling anxiety.  Dramatic PTSD. Attention Deficit. And so on and so on.   Etc etc etc.   There is no "old fashioned way".

Yeah maybe people get too many drugs, Rockin, but people on unnecessary drugs or people who are not correctly monitored is a bad scanario, not the state of the art.

These days and age, if you get a talk therapist of any kind who helps you, and an MD prescribing drugs that are helpful, well that's half the battle. 

But don't throw out the value of a good shrink, Rockin.

I still think a lot of Americans take too many unnecessary pills and I do think a lot of psychiatrists hand out prescriptions because they think it's "easier" that way. Like parents who are fairly quick to put their children into Ritalin.

Not disrespecting those with serious mental illness here, I do acknowledge some people do need these pills.

Offline mecch

  • Member
  • Posts: 11,492
  • red pill? or blue pill?
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2012, 03:03:00 AM »
I still think a lot of Americans take too many unnecessary pills and I do think a lot of psychiatrists hand out prescriptions because they think it's "easier" that way. Like parents who are fairly quick to put their children into Ritalin.

Not disrespecting those with serious mental illness here, I do acknowledge some people do need these pills.

Well gee willikers you are entitled to your "opinion" and "beliefs" here, which is about what it seems to be.  Rather insulting to the profession.  You realise psychiatrists are doctors and therapists.  And you realize in the US of Amercia, not all that many people have the insurance coverage to have access to any kind of therapy. 

Psychiatrist's time being quite expensive, there are many psychiatrists who are NOT permitted to do talk therapy and many of them find this a dire state of affairs.  I hardly think there are psychiatrists handing out pils because its "easy".   The target for your scorn would more likely be GPs, who can prescribe, but who are definitely NOT in the mental health business.  And for every bad seed GP MD, who might fit your scorn (just pill pushers, looking for easy solutions) there are probably 20 good doctors just trying to do the best considering what is affordable for the patient.



« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 03:04:43 AM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline tednlou2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4,836
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2012, 03:32:52 AM »
Thanks everyone for the replies.  I do feel very comfortable with my therapist.  He's gay, so that helps to be able to be open and with someone who can relate.  He also has many poz patients and worked with poz patients going back to the 80's.  Before seeing my current therapist, I had one before.  Talking about gay issues and HIV with him filled me with more anxiety.  I have no doubt there are great straight therapists, who many gay men and women have felt very comfortable with.  However, this guy just seemed like I was the only gay man and poz man he had ever met.   

I first began having depression in high school.  Although I had many family issues to bring on depression, I've always known it was a chemical imbalance that was at the core.  No amount of talk therapy will help with a chemical imbalance, in my opinion.  I mean, it can help, but you're not going to suddenly have your chemicals restored from talk therapy.  But, I know therapy can help so much in conjunction with a medication for so many.  There are things I've talked to my therapist about that my partner doesn't even know. 

I have wondered what's the point of paying some therapist to talk about things I talk to myself about, or to my partner about.  But, it has helped to have deep discussions about current and past issues.  There haven't been a ton of light bulb moments, but I haven't seen him that much yet.  But, there have been connections to events he has made that I didn't see before.  For me, I know I need a medication to help with an imbalance.  But, therapy is equally important to bring out issues anchoring you down, and learning how to deal with those past hurts, fears, and the current ones--learning to deal with them and how to move past them.       

I agree that there isn't a good reason to take on another doc at this time.  I just need to be more proactive and tell my family doc it is time for a med change.  I only see my family doc every 6 months for refills.  It is coming time for another appointment.  Since I last saw him, I have been feeling my depression and anxiety have gotten worse.  I'm thinking about going back on Prozac.  I took it years ago, and it really helped so much.  I felt so much better.  And, I didn't have all the sexual side-effects I experienced with others.  So, I think I'm going to give it another try and see if I get the same results.

Again, thanks to all for taking time to help.  It answered my question.  While a psychiatrist can be very beneficial, it isn't always necessary to see one for depression.  I don't have up's and down's, seen with manic depression.  My depression is a steady line, although it has taken a dip here lately.  Anyway, I suppose if a med change doesn't help, I may revisit seeing a psychiatrist, who deals more in medications.  However, since my initial post, I've discovered it can be difficult to get in to see one in my city.   

Offline BT65

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 9,912
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2012, 05:22:51 AM »
Psychiatrists write prescriptions, not necessarily because they think it's "easier," rather that's what they've been educated to do.  It would be like going to an endocrinologist for a thyroid imbalance, having the doctor write out a prescription, then saying "he did it just because it's easier."  No, that's what dr's train to do, to match meds with symptoms or illness.

Ted, does your therapist do cognitive therapy?  Ask him about it, and if he does, I would recommend it highly.  CBT has been very beneficial in people with depression, you should check it out.
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2012, 04:08:02 PM »
Thanks everyone for the replies.  I do feel very comfortable with my therapist.  He's gay, so that helps to be able to be open and with someone who can relate.  He also has many poz patients and worked with poz patients going back to the 80's.  Before seeing my current therapist, I had one before.  Talking about gay issues and HIV with him filled me with more anxiety.  I have no doubt there are great straight therapists, who many gay men and women have felt very comfortable with.  However, this guy just seemed like I was the only gay man and poz man he had ever met.   

I first began having depression in high school.  Although I had many family issues to bring on depression, I've always known it was a chemical imbalance that was at the core.  No amount of talk therapy will help with a chemical imbalance, in my opinion.  I mean, it can help, but you're not going to suddenly have your chemicals restored from talk therapy.  But, I know therapy can help so much in conjunction with a medication for so many.  There are things I've talked to my therapist about that my partner doesn't even know. 

I have wondered what's the point of paying some therapist to talk about things I talk to myself about, or to my partner about.  But, it has helped to have deep discussions about current and past issues.  There haven't been a ton of light bulb moments, but I haven't seen him that much yet.  But, there have been connections to events he has made that I didn't see before.  For me, I know I need a medication to help with an imbalance.  But, therapy is equally important to bring out issues anchoring you down, and learning how to deal with those past hurts, fears, and the current ones--learning to deal with them and how to move past them.       

I agree that there isn't a good reason to take on another doc at this time.  I just need to be more proactive and tell my family doc it is time for a med change.  I only see my family doc every 6 months for refills.  It is coming time for another appointment.  Since I last saw him, I have been feeling my depression and anxiety have gotten worse.  I'm thinking about going back on Prozac.  I took it years ago, and it really helped so much.  I felt so much better.  And, I didn't have all the sexual side-effects I experienced with others.  So, I think I'm going to give it another try and see if I get the same results.

Again, thanks to all for taking time to help.  It answered my question.  While a psychiatrist can be very beneficial, it isn't always necessary to see one for depression.  I don't have up's and down's, seen with manic depression.  My depression is a steady line, although it has taken a dip here lately.  Anyway, I suppose if a med change doesn't help, I may revisit seeing a psychiatrist, who deals more in medications.  However, since my initial post, I've discovered it can be difficult to get in to see one in my city.   

Do these bouts of depression and anxiety happen out of nowhere or are they related to your poz status? I did take Prozac ages ago but not for long.

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2012, 04:18:09 PM »
Psychiatrists write prescriptions, not necessarily because they think it's "easier," rather that's what they've been educated to do.  It would be like going to an endocrinologist for a thyroid imbalance, having the doctor write out a prescription, then saying "he did it just because it's easier."  No, that's what dr's train to do, to match meds with symptoms or illness.

It's just an opinion, that's all...not based on facts or anything. I think I'm naturally suspicious of doctors in general.

Offline Miss Philicia

  • Member
  • Posts: 24,013
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2012, 06:39:51 PM »
I disagree with a lot of what's been written in this thread. I think a GP writing prescriptions for mental health medications is fine and dandy if it's something you've been stable on for years. But if you're needing to switch around your mental health medications, and frankly that can happen quicker than you think, then you should be seeing a proper psychiatrist.
"I’ve slept with enough men to know that I’m not gay"

Offline Miss Philicia

  • Member
  • Posts: 24,013
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2012, 06:40:55 PM »
I still think a lot of Americans take too many unnecessary pills and I do think a lot of psychiatrists hand out prescriptions because they think it's "easier" that way.

I think a lot of Brazilians don't have a clue about certain issues. In fact, we all see it on this forum each and every day, almost hourly at times.
"I’ve slept with enough men to know that I’m not gay"

Offline thunter34

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,310
  • His name is Carl.
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2012, 09:19:50 PM »
Psychiatrists write prescriptions, not necessarily because they think it's "easier," rather that's what they've been educated to do.  It would be like going to an endocrinologist for a thyroid imbalance, having the doctor write out a prescription, then saying "he did it just because it's easier."  No, that's what dr's train to do, to match meds with symptoms or illness.

Ted, does your therapist do cognitive therapy?  Ask him about it, and if he does, I would recommend it highly.  CBT has been very beneficial in people with depression, you should check it out.

Hear, hear, Miss Betty!  I don't know where I would be without my current regimen of psyche meds.  I also sometimes wonder where I might be if I had found them sooner.  Untreated mental health issues were a MAJOR contributing factor to landing me right here.  I just don't think any kind of counseling alone would have stopped me from one of my mighty manic phases, and I needed some degree of medication to get me to a place where I could really hear and take in the benefits of counseling.

I'll also say that it was partly this stigma of "you shouldn't have to take psyche meds" that kept me from getting treatment in a timely manner.

That said, once I got a little stabilized, CBT did wonders.  Let me put that again in all caps:  WONDERS.  I can still use it to help pull me out of some sudden funks very fast.

I dunno...I'm kind of of the mind that mental health issues are viewed incorrectly - as something that you can find the right therapy for and "fix"...like one certain pill will do it once and for all or somehow you'll hit on just the right conversation in therapy and that will be that.  I don't think so.  I think it's something to be viewed as an ongoing, chronic type of condition, and treatments will have to be monitored and adjusted over time. 
AIDS isn't for sissies.

Offline Rockin

  • Member
  • Posts: 494
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2012, 12:27:08 AM »
I think a lot of Brazilians don't have a clue about certain issues. In fact, we all see it on this forum each and every day, almost hourly at times.

Very cheap shot. And I bet most Europeans feel the same way.

Offline mecch

  • Member
  • Posts: 11,492
  • red pill? or blue pill?
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2012, 11:59:28 AM »
Well not most Swiss. There are several pharmacies on every single block, it seems.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline tednlou2

  • Member
  • Posts: 4,836
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #18 on: September 08, 2012, 02:37:03 AM »
Ted, does your therapist do cognitive therapy?  Ask him about it, and if he does, I would recommend it highly.  CBT has been very beneficial in people with depression, you should check it out.

After reading about here, I did ask him about CBT.  His reply was, "That's what were doing."  If we were doing CBT, I didn't realize it.  But, I didn't know exactly what it was.  I know he asks me in great detail the fears I have, the thoughts I have before having a panic attack, etc.  Then, he has me to examine those fears and how much is irrational vs rational.  When I have a panic attack and thought I was dying or something, I didn't die or something.  He also gave me this worksheet where I write down when I have fears and worries.  I have to describe the fears.  Then, I rate at what level my anxiety is at.  Then, I write down the things I talk to myself about to work through those fears.  So, I guess I am doing CBT?

I've discussed with him how the anxiety and panic attacks don't always come when I'm having negative thoughts.  Or, I'm not aware I'm having negative thoughts.  Just as often, I can be having a great time and laughing.  And, boom.  He said with a chemical imbalance, the brain can get mixed signals.  He said the brain can confuse positive stimuli with negative.  So, having a good time can fill the brain with stimuli that the brain doesn't know how to process.  This is why I think a chemical imbalance is playing such a key role in this.  If not for a preexisting imbalance, I honestly don't think I would still be dealing with this.       


Offline BT65

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • Posts: 9,912
Re: Benefits Of Seeing A Psychiatrist?
« Reply #19 on: September 08, 2012, 06:00:08 AM »
CBT is basically changing the thoughts (if you change the thoughts, behavior will follow).   I have panic attacks from time to time, but nothing like they used to be.  I actually passed out one time writing a check in Kroger's from a panic attack.  I was writing the check, and all of a sudden, my heart started racing, everything started fading, and the next thing I knew I was on a bench in the store and someone was offering me orange juice (the person thought I was having an episode of hypoglycemia).  This was years ago.  Now, I usually have the attacks when I'm driving, or while shopping.  I just think myself through them though, I don't take any benzo's.  Not that benzo's have no value, but I ended up pretty strung out.

With the brain, actually if you change the behavior, the brain can re-wire itself.  There was a study years ago, called the Silver (something) Monkey study.  This scientist cut the nerve control to these monkey's right arms.  Then he put a straight jacket on the monkeys that would hold their left arm still.  He actually got these monkeys to the point where they re-learned how to use their right arms.  So it is possible to re-train the brain.  CBT helps do this.  In other words, sometimes when the neurotransmitters aren't being used in their "regular" function, they will relocate to where they are needed; in simple terms.  An example would be where a blind person has an unusually good sense of touch.  The neurotransmitters needed for sight are not being used, so they relocate to the part of the brain associated with touch.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 06:03:12 AM by BT65 »
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

 


Terms of Membership for these forums
 

© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved.   terms of use and your privacy
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.