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Author Topic: aspirin the wonder drug?  (Read 3506 times)

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Offline friskyguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 102
aspirin the wonder drug?
« on: August 14, 2012, 01:02:49 PM »
Inflammation is the silent killer that can take us to an early grave despite being UD and having good CD4 counts.

Those at increased risk for cardiovascular disease....ie people getting on with age, with diabetes, smokers, overweight tubbies or maybe even those taking Abacavir or other meds may benefit from including a baby aspirin into their pillbox too.

Recently read that taking it with vitamin c you can minimise the side effects on the stomach.

Anyone else taking the wonder drug?


HIV Basic Science Inflammation AIDS 2012: Aspirin Dampens Immune Activation in HIV+ People on ART
 

AIDS 2012: Aspirin Dampens Immune Activation in HIV+ People on ART
Details Category: Inflammation & Immune Activation Published on Friday, 10 August 2012 00:00 Written by Liz Highleyman . .

Taking a daily aspirin reduces immune activation and activity of platelets -- the cells responsible for blood clotting -- which may help counteract the increased risk of cardiovascular problems among people with HIV taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), researchers reported at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) last week in Washington, DC.

Taking a daily aspirin reduces immune activation and activity of platelets -- the cells responsible for blood clotting -- which may help counteract the increased risk of cardiovascular problems among people with HIV taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), researchers reported at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) last week in Washington, DC.
 
Several studies have shown that HIV positive people are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, and a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and excessive immune activation contribute to this and other non-AIDS conditions seen at higher rates among people with HIV as they live to older ages.
 
[More inflammation and immune activation research presented at AIDS 2012]
 
Meagan O'Brien from New York University Medical School and colleagues conducted a laboratory study of platelet aggregation -- characteristic of clotting or coagulation -- in blood collected from HIV positive people.
 
Platelet aggregation in vitro has been studied as a biological marker of coronary events and mortality among HIV negative people, they noted. Daily aspirin is often recommended to "thin the blood" and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attacks, but it has the potential side effect of gastrointestinal bleeding.
 
The researchers analyzed platelet aggregation in blood from 25 HIV positive patients on ART for at least 6 months; about half were taking a protease inhibitor and about one-third were on a NNRTI. Most (about 75%) were men, 44% were white, the median age was 50 years, and more than half were smokers. They had undetectable plasma HIV RNA and a high median CD4 T-cell count of about 600 cells/mm3.
 
This group was compared against 44 healthy HIV negative control subjects, who were not very well matched with regard to cardiovascular risk factors. Just under half were men, 57% were white, the median age was just 27 years, and fewer than 10% were smokers.
 
The investigators looked at how platelets changed in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which is released when platelets are activated and inhibits further activation; arachidonic acid, a fatty acid involved in cell signaling; collagen, a component of fibrous tissue; epinephrine(aka adrenaline), a hormone with multiple functions including control of the sympathetic nervous system; or no agonist or stimulant (known as spontaneous platelet aggregation).
 
They then assessed the effects of aspirin -- 81 mg once-daily for 1 week -- on platelet aggregation, activation markers, and various biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation.
 
Results
At baseline, HIV positive people on ART had significantly greater platelet aggregation compared with HIV negative control subjects under 4 of the 5 conditions studied.

After taking aspirin for a 1 day, platelet aggregation decreased significantly in the HIV positive group, with the effect being sustained after 1 week.
Platelet aggregation in response to arachidonic acid, however, remained significantly higher in the HIV positive group.

At baseline, HIV positive participants on ART had a significantly higher percentage of activated (HLA-DR+CD38+) CD4 T-cells and CD8 T-cells.

After taking aspirin, the HIV positive participants saw a significant decrease in percentage of activated CD4 cells (from 15% to 11%) and activated CD8 cells (from 14% to 8%).

However, no significant changes in activated T-cells were noted among the HIV negative control subjects.

Several biomarkers either fell significantly (e.g., activation markers P-selectin and soluble CD14), or showed a downward trend (e.g., inflammation markers high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, coagulation marker D-dimer).

HIV positive participants on ART had more "microparticles," mostly made up of inactivated platelets, than HIV negative controls, even after taking aspirin.
 
"Platelet activity is increased in HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART, which may contribute to their heightened cardiovascular risk," the researchers concluded. "One week of 81 mg of aspirin attenuated platelet activation and immune activation in HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART."
 
8/10/12
 
Reference
 
M O'Brien, MA Nardi, E Montenont, et al. Increased platelet activity and immune activation in HIV-positive subjects on antiretroviral therapy is attenuated with low-dose aspirin. XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012). Washington, DC, July 22-27, 2012. Abstract THAB0202.

Sero converted Sept '10 / Confirmed + Dec '10
Jan '11, VL 9,500 / CD4 482 (32%)
Feb '11, VL 5,800 / CD4 680 (37%)
start Atripla
Mch '11, VL UD / CD4 700 (42%)
Jun  '11, VL UD / CD4 750 (43%)
swap to Kivexa and Efav. due to osteopenia diag. (DEXA) / kidney issues ( decline in eGFR to 77 )
start supplements - Vit D3 / Omega 3 / multivitamin / mini aspirin
Dec '11,  VL UD <20 /  CD4 670 (49%)  / CD4:CD8 = 1.4
all labs now within normal ranges
Mch '12,  VL UD / CD4 600 (51%)
Sep '12,  VL UD / CD4 810 (51%)
Mch '13   VL UD / CD4 965 (56%)
Sep '13   VL UD / CD4 (not taken)
Dec '13   VL UD / CD4 901 (35%) / CD4:CD8 = 1.1  /  eGFR > 100

Offline hopeisvague

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  • Posts: 11
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2012, 01:27:05 PM »
I enrolled myself into the self-monitored aspirin trial with vitamin C indefinitely unless I experience any GI discomfort. I chewed a vitamin C chewable to go with a quarter of disprin (soluble aspirin 300mg 1 tab). 
« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 01:31:43 PM by hopeisvague »
201206 351/95000 Started I/T

Offline Common_ground

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  • Posts: 288
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2012, 01:36:18 PM »
What about long term use of aspirin? Any risks for liver or kidney damage since most of us chewing arv's as well?

« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 03:02:32 PM by Common_ground »
2011 May - Neg.
2012 June CD4:205, 16% VL:2676 Start Truvada/Stocrin
2012 July  CD4:234, 18% VL:88
2012 Sep  CD4:238, 17% VL:UD
2013 Feb  CD4:257, 24% VL:UD -viramune/truvada
2013 May CD4:276, 26% VL:UD

Offline friskyguy

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  • Posts: 102
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2012, 12:03:21 AM »
I enrolled myself into the self-monitored aspirin trial with vitamin C indefinitely unless I experience any GI discomfort. I chewed a vitamin C chewable to go with a quarter of disprin (soluble aspirin 300mg 1 tab). 

you may want to think about lowering the dose?......I was under the impression that a daily mini-aspirin is more than enough to thin the blood and prevent the clogging of our veins/arteries.......around 80mg
Sero converted Sept '10 / Confirmed + Dec '10
Jan '11, VL 9,500 / CD4 482 (32%)
Feb '11, VL 5,800 / CD4 680 (37%)
start Atripla
Mch '11, VL UD / CD4 700 (42%)
Jun  '11, VL UD / CD4 750 (43%)
swap to Kivexa and Efav. due to osteopenia diag. (DEXA) / kidney issues ( decline in eGFR to 77 )
start supplements - Vit D3 / Omega 3 / multivitamin / mini aspirin
Dec '11,  VL UD <20 /  CD4 670 (49%)  / CD4:CD8 = 1.4
all labs now within normal ranges
Mch '12,  VL UD / CD4 600 (51%)
Sep '12,  VL UD / CD4 810 (51%)
Mch '13   VL UD / CD4 965 (56%)
Sep '13   VL UD / CD4 (not taken)
Dec '13   VL UD / CD4 901 (35%) / CD4:CD8 = 1.1  /  eGFR > 100

Offline hopeisvague

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  • Posts: 11
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2012, 12:40:30 AM »
Thanks for your advice. I take a quarter of the 300mg tab (about 75mg) only. A very low dose is something between 75-100mg for prophylaxis use.

The problem is poz in what age should begin the use of aspirin. Though I'm below 40, I am aware of the infection itself as a risk factor of CVD that I should do something before it makes my blood vessels brittle.
201206 351/95000 Started I/T

Offline friskyguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 102
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2012, 01:09:53 AM »
Sorry I misread your posting.......inflammation of the brain already?  :-\

Yes my understanding is that being pos in itself, and not on meds, regardless of age, is a predictor of inflammation in our bodies and therefore an increased risk in cardiovascular issues. Meds can also increase the risk too.....so we're screwed either way.

I'm on Kivexa which may increase the risk of CV issues (controversial), that's one of the reasons why I take it.....a very simple pill and very small.

The min-asprin is also very popular with the non-hiv population too to thin the blood and prevent blockages and build up of plaque. This is a very simple tool in reducing inflammation that has been around for some time now and widely used....just check for any side effects which is the same for taking any other drug.

Being UD with good CD4 numbers may not be enough to prevent the increased risks that everyone here faces.

I have read in many articles that a good biomarker to test for your increased likelihood of potential heart-attacks/strokes etc, as a result of inflammation, is a higher than normal c-reactive protein result.......reference to this test is in the original article posted. This is a cheap and very standard blood test.
Sero converted Sept '10 / Confirmed + Dec '10
Jan '11, VL 9,500 / CD4 482 (32%)
Feb '11, VL 5,800 / CD4 680 (37%)
start Atripla
Mch '11, VL UD / CD4 700 (42%)
Jun  '11, VL UD / CD4 750 (43%)
swap to Kivexa and Efav. due to osteopenia diag. (DEXA) / kidney issues ( decline in eGFR to 77 )
start supplements - Vit D3 / Omega 3 / multivitamin / mini aspirin
Dec '11,  VL UD <20 /  CD4 670 (49%)  / CD4:CD8 = 1.4
all labs now within normal ranges
Mch '12,  VL UD / CD4 600 (51%)
Sep '12,  VL UD / CD4 810 (51%)
Mch '13   VL UD / CD4 965 (56%)
Sep '13   VL UD / CD4 (not taken)
Dec '13   VL UD / CD4 901 (35%) / CD4:CD8 = 1.1  /  eGFR > 100

Offline jkinatl2

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  • Posts: 6,007
  • Doo. Dah. Dipp-ity.
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2012, 01:32:24 AM »
Begs the question: Do ID docs regularly check for inflammatory markers in blood work?
"Many people, especially in the gay community, turn to oral sex as a safer alternative in the age of AIDS. And with HIV rates rising, people need to remember that oral sex is safer sex. It's a reasonable alternative."

-Kimberly Page-Shafer, PhD, MPH

Welcome Thread

Offline friskyguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 102
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2012, 02:08:19 AM »
Certainly not in the standard labs routinely offered where I seek treatment.

The quality and service provision of your respective medical provider should always be questioned and monitored. Especially when new/amended information that can benefit a patient comes to hand.

Costs to the system (which are a determining factor for the majority of developed countries that practise socialised medicine) and not being uspskilled are also relevant issues that determine if appropriate treatment is in fact provided/offered.

Medical providers (whatever you want to call them) and their recommendations should never be taken for granted as the gospel truth......one needs to take an active role in managing one's own health.....i think we have all have been around long enough to recognise and appreciate this.
Sero converted Sept '10 / Confirmed + Dec '10
Jan '11, VL 9,500 / CD4 482 (32%)
Feb '11, VL 5,800 / CD4 680 (37%)
start Atripla
Mch '11, VL UD / CD4 700 (42%)
Jun  '11, VL UD / CD4 750 (43%)
swap to Kivexa and Efav. due to osteopenia diag. (DEXA) / kidney issues ( decline in eGFR to 77 )
start supplements - Vit D3 / Omega 3 / multivitamin / mini aspirin
Dec '11,  VL UD <20 /  CD4 670 (49%)  / CD4:CD8 = 1.4
all labs now within normal ranges
Mch '12,  VL UD / CD4 600 (51%)
Sep '12,  VL UD / CD4 810 (51%)
Mch '13   VL UD / CD4 965 (56%)
Sep '13   VL UD / CD4 (not taken)
Dec '13   VL UD / CD4 901 (35%) / CD4:CD8 = 1.1  /  eGFR > 100

Offline jkinatl2

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  • Posts: 6,007
  • Doo. Dah. Dipp-ity.
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2012, 02:18:35 AM »
Certainly not in the standard labs routinely offered where I seek treatment.

The quality and service provision of your respective medical provider should always be questioned and monitored. Especially when new/amended information that can benefit a patient comes to hand.

Costs to the system (which are a determining factor for the majority of developed countries that practise socialised medicine) and not being uspskilled are also relevant issues that determine if appropriate treatment is in fact provided/offered.

Medical providers (whatever you want to call them) and their recommendations should never be taken for granted as the gospel truth......one needs to take an active role in managing one's own health.....i think we have all have been around long enough to recognise and appreciate this.

I will certainly ask my doctor if he orders these tests, and if not, why.

Hopefully someone else with more treatment knowledge can chime in.

"Many people, especially in the gay community, turn to oral sex as a safer alternative in the age of AIDS. And with HIV rates rising, people need to remember that oral sex is safer sex. It's a reasonable alternative."

-Kimberly Page-Shafer, PhD, MPH

Welcome Thread

Offline friskyguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 102
Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2012, 02:45:40 AM »
I will certainly ask my doctor if he orders these tests, and if not, why.

Hopefully someone else with more treatment knowledge can chime in.



Good idea.......and btw check out an anecdotal posting by BROCKHARE in the Long-term survivors index......titled High CRP numbers.....possible heart condition
(Sorry not sure how to post his direct posting link here)
Sero converted Sept '10 / Confirmed + Dec '10
Jan '11, VL 9,500 / CD4 482 (32%)
Feb '11, VL 5,800 / CD4 680 (37%)
start Atripla
Mch '11, VL UD / CD4 700 (42%)
Jun  '11, VL UD / CD4 750 (43%)
swap to Kivexa and Efav. due to osteopenia diag. (DEXA) / kidney issues ( decline in eGFR to 77 )
start supplements - Vit D3 / Omega 3 / multivitamin / mini aspirin
Dec '11,  VL UD <20 /  CD4 670 (49%)  / CD4:CD8 = 1.4
all labs now within normal ranges
Mch '12,  VL UD / CD4 600 (51%)
Sep '12,  VL UD / CD4 810 (51%)
Mch '13   VL UD / CD4 965 (56%)
Sep '13   VL UD / CD4 (not taken)
Dec '13   VL UD / CD4 901 (35%) / CD4:CD8 = 1.1  /  eGFR > 100

Offline Solo_LTSurvivor

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2012, 12:30:43 PM »
Good idea.......and btw check out an anecdotal posting by BROCKHARE in the Long-term survivors index......titled High CRP numbers.....possible heart condition
(Sorry not sure how to post his direct posting link here)

Brockhare's post
don't equate intelligence with lack of masculinity
Jim Phelps, Mission Impossible
____________________________

Seroconverted: Early 80s
Tested & confirmed what I already knew: early 90s

Current regimen: Atripla. 
Last regimen:  Epzicom, Sustiva (since its inception with NO adverse side effects: no vivid dreams and NONE of the problems people who can't tolerate this drug may experience: color me lucky ::))
Past regimens
Fun stuff (in the past):  HAV/HBV, crypto, shingles, AIDS, PCP

Jan 2012: 818/21%
Apr 2012: 964/22%
Jul. 2012: 890/21%
Oct. 2012: 920/23%

Still UD after all these years

Offline elf

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2012, 04:41:12 PM »
I've been taking a low dose aspirin for 3 years now.
Our forum user Inchlingblue recommended it to me.
It's old news folks.  :)
Let's have a Kiki!

Offline J.R.E.

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2012, 01:39:15 AM »

I've also been on a low dose aspirin for quite a few years now.


Edited to add, I only take low dose aspirin 5 days a week, off two.


Ray

Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

 As of DEC 9th, 2013,  t-cells are at 437 Viral load  <40 .

 Current % is at 16% (L)

  
 62 years young.

Offline Common_ground

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2012, 04:41:03 AM »
Ill ask again :)
What drawbacks are there with short/long term aspirin use?

My main concern would be for the liver and kidneys.
2011 May - Neg.
2012 June CD4:205, 16% VL:2676 Start Truvada/Stocrin
2012 July  CD4:234, 18% VL:88
2012 Sep  CD4:238, 17% VL:UD
2013 Feb  CD4:257, 24% VL:UD -viramune/truvada
2013 May CD4:276, 26% VL:UD

Offline Ann

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2012, 06:16:05 AM »
Ill ask again :)
What drawbacks are there with short/long term aspirin use?

My main concern would be for the liver and kidneys.

Your main concern should be for your stomach. Long-term aspirin use (and some other NSAIDs) can cause ulcers - although taking only one a day and taking it with food will reduce this risk. Some people are more sensitive to this effect than others - my stomach doesn't like NSAIDs very much, but I know plenty of people who have no problems with them.

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Offline Common_ground

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2012, 07:00:40 AM »
Well, most info I found about aspirin use is for older folks and/or with heart conditions and seronegative. Me as in my late 20īs dont fit that well both because of HIV and my age.

To consume 81 mg of aspirin a day might not be much, but if I start now that will add up in the long term. I also havent found that many studies in HIV+ people as this finding seems to be somewhat recent. What I do found is that once starting taking aspirin regularly its a bad idea to stop, which makes starting daily aspirin a commitment (lifelong?)

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Aspirin_Quitting_cold_turkey_could_be_dangerous.htm

Lets say 10-20-30 years of aspirin use, what does that do with your body and what are the pros vs. the cons . If you burden other organs such as the stomach and or the liver, what effects do this have in the long run, bearing in mind that you might put yourself in a worse position than before if stopping (deliberately or forced.)

I will talk to my doc about this next month anyway but just wanted some comments from the folks here.

Google works just fine btw.
 
2011 May - Neg.
2012 June CD4:205, 16% VL:2676 Start Truvada/Stocrin
2012 July  CD4:234, 18% VL:88
2012 Sep  CD4:238, 17% VL:UD
2013 Feb  CD4:257, 24% VL:UD -viramune/truvada
2013 May CD4:276, 26% VL:UD

Offline elf

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Re: aspirin the wonder drug?
« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2012, 03:16:05 PM »
You can get a coated asprin, or take it with vitamin C.  ;)
Let's have a Kiki!

 


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