Meds, Mind, Body & Benefits > Nutrition & HIV

Calcium/Vitamin D

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SANJUANDUDE:
Have any of you heard that the supplement Calcium/Vitamin D may aid in increasing a person's CD-4 count??  I am on a Yahoo Group called, Poz Health, and the topic came up.  Also, there has been some reports that Selenium can help to increase t-cells.

The primary element with any vitamins and supplents is that there is never any proof.

http://timehasshownme.com

newt:
There is no study showing vitamin D supplementation, or indeed having normal vitamin D levels, raises CD4 count, compared to having vitamin D deficiency.

Vitamin D. oh mysterious vitamin, important but mysterious. Overt he counter supplements are not that effective at getting the vitamin into your body (tho food is) and having more than necessary in your body/using supplements is not associated with health benefit in respect of HIV. << but the serious studies are non-existent as you note

Vitamin D may help with some autoimmune diseases. The paradoxical effects of vitamin D on immune responses to (acute) infection while suppressing (long term) autoimmune disease requires additional investigation, a serious researcher has said. << whether or which of these this applies to HIV is unclear.

In general if you don't have enough vitamin D (as many people with HIV don't) this is not so good (as with HIV- peope) but too much, it gets pissed out (or equivalent).

Calcium may be more important to immune regulation, and being deficient is deffo bad for your heart, bones, immunity etc, but you don't need much and too much may well be bad for your heart as well. There is nothing serious to say it affects CD4 cells positively though (indeed, the best, if scant research, says it has no major effect either way).

Selenium, the research is more in favour of a modest effect on CD4 and viral load. Although on viral load, at a reading of over 100,000 the typical -10,000 reduction is neither here nor there. A 200μg dose of selenium daily may produce a modest +30 CD4 count on average (but not in all people, some lose cells). And with combination therapy this is probably beside the point after a year of meds.

- matt

madbrain:

--- Quote from: newt on January 15, 2012, 03:51:28 PM ---Overt he counter supplements are not that effective at getting the vitamin into your body (tho food is) and having more than necessary in your body/using supplements is not associated with health benefit in respect of HIV. << but the serious studies are non-existent as you note

--- End quote ---

Not sure what you are smoking here.

Food generally contain minuscule amounts of vitamin D and are not a significant source of vitamin D for the body.

The sun is the most effective source, but in the winter you can usually not get enough vitamin D from the it.

Supplements are quite effective at raising vitamin D levels and are commonly prescribed for that purpose. But you do have to find the proper individual dosage, which can take multiple vitamin D level tests and trial and error. The 400 IU dose that is typically recommended is indeed completely ineffective at raising your levels. Many doctors recommend 2000 IU/day now.

Personally, I arrived at a dose of 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day to maintain my levels. This is because I take 3 prescriptions that deplete vitamin D, and I don't go out much in the sun. Most people don't need as much per day.


--- Quote ---In general if you don't have enough vitamin D (as many people with HIV don't) this is not so good (as with HIV- peope) but too much, it gets pissed out (or equivalent).

--- End quote ---

Vitamin D is fat soluble and does not get pissed out. In fact you can take a very large dose of vitamin D all at once to raise your level, in the hundreds of thousands of IU. It is often prescribed that way when levels are very low.

newt:
I do not equate prescription vitamin D with supplements. Supplements for me means what you get in the health food shop. I agree prescription preparations can be effective sometimes.

Vitamin D is mostly excreted in the bile. It is also turned into to water-soluble chemiccals and excreted in the urine. So I believe saying it gets pissed out (or equivalent) is acccurate.

- matt

madbrain:

--- Quote from: newt on January 17, 2012, 02:12:50 AM ---I do not equate prescription vitamin D with supplements. Supplements for me means what you get in the health food shop. I agree prescription preparations can be effective sometimes.

--- End quote ---

You can "prescribed" an over-the-counter D3 supplement by your doctor, just like they will sometimes tell you to take over-the-counter medications.
Or you can also get a vitamin D2 supplement as a prescription also.

Vitamin D2 has been shown to be less effective at raising vitamin D levels than vitamin D3.
There have been many studies on that. One I just googled is http://www.ajcn.org/content/68/4/854.short .

So in this case, the over the counter vitamin D3 supplements are actually superior - whether you buy them at a drugstore, your pharmacy or a health food store. But it helps to check if it's USP verified and/or if the manufacturer follows GMP.


--- Quote ---So I believe saying it gets pissed out (or equivalent) is acccurate.

--- End quote ---

I don't think it's accurate. Fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin D can accumulate in the body for long periods of time.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/451616-do-all-excess-vitamins-get-excreted-from-the-body/

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