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Author Topic: Hepatitis C  (Read 9394 times)

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Offline pozinathens

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  • Posts: 27
Hepatitis C
« on: May 17, 2011, 04:48:18 PM »
I got news today that I have tested positive for Hepatitis C. My doctor's office phoned and left a message for me to drop by and get an order for more blood work. It indicated that he was doing a viral load test for Hep C. I assume this is so he can determine the amount of it in my blood and potentially what source of treatment to prescribe.

I didn't really get to meet with him today. I have been relatively trouble free except my last two blood reports showed elevated liver enzymes. He did not seem real concerned at first but wanted to screen for Hep C to see if it was medicines I am on that was causing it.

Right now, I am pretty scared to death although I know this is not anything to get overly stressed at the moment since stress is the least  thing I need to deal with right now.

Anyone who can share words of wisdom or advice who may be dealing with this too along with their HIV infection is most welcomed!


Offline John2038

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2011, 05:10:24 PM »
Sorry for you man.
Some news came out recently about hcv :
http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=37594.0

Offline wolfter

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2011, 05:41:51 PM »
I've never experienced this illness but have known many who have.  There are several members here who also have first hand experience and they will certainly help put you at ease. 

Sending positive energy your way!
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2011, 08:23:11 PM »
Many thanks to you ALL. I appreciate all the information and positive vibes.

Offline tednlou2

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2011, 11:42:24 PM »
Sending good thoughts your way.  I just read that Steven Tyler from Aerosmith and Idol has Hep C--or had it.  I should learn more about it, because I'm not sure whether you're always considered to have even after successful treatment.  As wolfter said, there are members here who will be able to give you a wealth of info and help. 


Offline SunnyFlorida

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2011, 12:06:43 AM »
Sending positive energy your way... I'm sure Ann will chime in this thread. She had Hep-C as well and was able to clear it, hopefully she'll give you some great advice! Hugs :)

LabRat

  • Guest
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2011, 09:54:11 AM »
Hey Poz,
Try not to freak out. You are correct, stress is not what you need right now. There are newer drugs on the market that not only increase your chances of clearing the virus, but also in half the time as standard treatment.

Your next blood test will probably be for VL and genotype. I had genotype 1 which is the most difficult to clear.

I lived with hep C for quite awhile (many years) before treatment. My liver enzymes were always "slightly elevated" but never increased. I finally agreed to undergo treatment after my t-cell counts stabilized and I was UD.

I took the standard ribavirin/interferon treatment for hep C last year and successfully cleared the virus. It wasn't easy, but I'm now glad I toughed it out.

There is a website that is very helpful: http://www.hivandhepatitis.com  It has all the latest treatment news and info on the new drugs now available. You can also sign up for regular email updates.

There is also a forum that I found helpful: http://www.medhelp.org/forums/Hepatitis-C/show/75?page=1

It will be up to both you and your doctor as to when you want to start treatment. You don't have to rush into it. Take your time, do some research and discuss your concerns with your doctor. I found that being mentally prepared to undergo treatment was as important as being physically prepared.

If you have any questions, PM me and I'll try to help you out.

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2011, 10:22:43 AM »
Many thanks for the excellent information and resources everyone. I appreciate it all. The doctor has requested a viral load but I have not gotten the results back yet. I will start researching and learning more.

Everyone here is so awesome.

LabRat

  • Guest
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2011, 11:51:38 AM »
Just found another link to the FDA about the new Hep C drugs:

http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm255390.htm


Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2011, 12:08:45 PM »
Hi PiA. I've been meaning to post in this thread for a few days now.

If you have not yet had a hcv viral load, you may be happy to hear that you have yet to be confirmed as having an active infection. Around 20% of people who get infected with hcv will clear the virus on their own and the only way to find out if you are just registering antibodies (which in this case only means that you've had the virus at some point) or if you actually still have the active infection is to have the VL test.

You could also possibly have a very new infection where your body has not yet had a chance to clear the virus. If it is a new infection, the success rates for the treatment are very high when started very early.

The website LabRat linked you to is very good. (hivandhepatitis.com) The parent company of this website (AIDSmeds/POZ) also has a hepatitis website, although it is no where near as active as this one. Regardless, there is a very good, basic but factual lesson on hep C here as well as a basic hepatitis overview here.

As LabRat mentioned, the treatment isn't very nice, but it's worth persevering in order to get the cure. I did my treatment in '02/'03 and I've not had a hcv VL since about ten weeks into the treatment.

Good luck and if you have any more specific questions, you know where to come.

Ann
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2011, 02:22:39 PM »
Many thanks for the encouraging words Ann! I am still awaiting results of the VL test. I will report back when I hear back. I appreciate the extra links! I will be sure to check them out. It is great to know that the support is out here.

I will also let you know if I have any more specific questions the more I read and discover.

Offline newt

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2011, 02:33:06 PM »
I consider this the definitive guide to HIV and hep C

http://i-base.info/guides/hepc

Hep C treatment seems on the very of a breaktrhough in effectiveness, so be very hopeful.

All the best

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2011, 02:46:07 PM »
Wow, this forum is amazing! Much appreciated!

Offline BJS2011

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2011, 12:52:14 PM »
I got news today that I have tested positive for Hepatitis C. My doctor's office phoned and left a message for me to drop by and get an order for more blood work. It indicated that he was doing a viral load test for Hep C. I assume this is so he can determine the amount of it in my blood and potentially what source of treatment to prescribe.

I didn't really get to meet with him today. I have been relatively trouble free except my last two blood reports showed elevated liver enzymes. He did not seem real concerned at first but wanted to screen for Hep C to see if it was medicines I am on that was causing it.

Right now, I am pretty scared to death although I know this is not anything to get overly stressed at the moment since stress is the least  thing I need to deal with right now.
Don't be scared. I have had Hep C for 25 yrs and HIV and never had a problem with HEP C. I was told to get treatment but I will be damned if I am going to put myself through that hell  when I am perfectly fine. If the time comes I need treatment fine but for now I don't even worry about it.
Anyone who can share words of wisdom or advice who may be dealing with this too along with their HIV infection is most welcomed!



Offline BJS2011

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2011, 12:53:39 PM »
Sending good thoughts your way.  I just read that Steven Tyler from Aerosmith and Idol has Hep C--or had it.  I should learn more about it, because I'm not sure whether you're always considered to have even after successful treatment.  As wolfter said, there are members here who will be able to give you a wealth of info and help. 


I was told therte is a 25% that treatment will work. Terrible odds

Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2011, 12:58:12 PM »
I was told therte is a 25% that treatment will work. Terrible odds

The odds differ from genotype to genotype, but no genotype has odds that bad. Without looking it up, I believe the worst success rate is 40-45% for type 1b. Still not great, but much better than 25%. Some genotypes have a very good - up to 90% - success rate.

There is also a new drug in the pipeline - just about to be approved - that raises the success rate even for 1b to around 80%.

The problem with waiting until you "need" hcv treatment is often the longer you leave it, the harder it is to treat and the more possibly irreversible damage has been done.

The treatment isn't nice, but it's only for a year at most - some genotypes can be treated in six months - and if you get the cure, it's well worth it.
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline pozinathens

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  • Posts: 27
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2011, 01:32:36 PM »
I still have not heard back from my doctor regarding the viral load test. I am hoping that is a good sign. If I don't hear something by tomorrow though I will phone him.

Anyone know how long the test takes? I guess I should be patient. I know it takes a little while for the HIV viral load tests.

Offline Ann

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    • Num is sum qui mentiar tibi?
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2011, 01:45:42 PM »
Hcv viral load tests can sometimes take several weeks. From what I understand, it's because they run them in batches and it can sometimes take a while to accumulate enough samples to warrant running the tests.

There's no harm in ringing your doctor to find out if the results are in yet. Sometimes they forget to get back in touch - they're only human like the rest of us, and busy humans at that.
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2011, 01:46:44 PM »
Thanks Ann! It is such a comfort knowing you and others are here.

Offline wolfter

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2011, 02:07:05 PM »
I've learned quite a bit about this Virus from you all.  Hope you found some of the answers you were looking for.  Having been tested for many OI's over the years, a long wait for the results usually is a good sign.  If they call you the next morning, then you probably have something  to worry about.  :)
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline Solo_LTSurvivor

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2011, 02:56:55 PM »
Having been tested for many OI's over the years, a long wait for the results usually is a good sign.  If they call you the next morning, then you probably have something to worry about.  :)

HCV isn't an opportunistic infection, Wolfie: it is an infectious disease :)  Please don't think that I'm scolding you when I say this. I'm just confirming that this place is a wealth of knowledge and we have the ability to learn new things each and every day just by hanging out here.
don't equate intelligence with lack of masculinity
Jim Phelps, Mission Impossible
____________________________

Seroconverted: Early 80s
Tested & confirmed what I already knew: early 90s

Current regimen: Atripla. 
Last regimen:  Epzicom, Sustiva (since its inception with NO adverse side effects: no vivid dreams and NONE of the problems people who can't tolerate this drug may experience: color me lucky ::))
Past regimens
Fun stuff (in the past):  HAV/HBV, crypto, shingles, AIDS, PCP

Jan 2012: 818/21%
Apr 2012: 964/22%
Jul. 2012: 890/21%
Oct. 2012: 920/23%

Still UD after all these years

Offline wolfter

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2011, 03:10:43 PM »
I actually knew that....so sorry.  Scold me?  WTF, I'm not 12. 
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline Solo_LTSurvivor

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2011, 03:17:16 PM »
Scold me?  WTF, I'm not 12. 

No one said you were.  This is exactly why I prefaced what I said with what I did, as we all know how things can be taken out of context online resulting in people taking offense over the most trivial statements.
don't equate intelligence with lack of masculinity
Jim Phelps, Mission Impossible
____________________________

Seroconverted: Early 80s
Tested & confirmed what I already knew: early 90s

Current regimen: Atripla. 
Last regimen:  Epzicom, Sustiva (since its inception with NO adverse side effects: no vivid dreams and NONE of the problems people who can't tolerate this drug may experience: color me lucky ::))
Past regimens
Fun stuff (in the past):  HAV/HBV, crypto, shingles, AIDS, PCP

Jan 2012: 818/21%
Apr 2012: 964/22%
Jul. 2012: 890/21%
Oct. 2012: 920/23%

Still UD after all these years

Offline Tim Horn

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  • Posts: 799
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2011, 03:19:24 PM »
HCV isn't an opportunistic infection, Wolfie: it is an infectious disease :)  Please don't think that I'm scolding you when I say this. I'm just confirming that this place is a wealth of knowledge and we have the ability to learn new things each and every day just by hanging out here.

While HCV wasn't included in the CDC OI lists produced in the 1980s and early 1990s -- likely because many people living with HIV were dying of other manifestations, long before HCV could run its course -- many experts do believe that HCV is a bona fide opportunistic infection in the setting of HIV infection. There are several reasons for this: Compared with those living with HCV (but not HIV), HCV disease is clearly accelerated in the setting of HIV, with more rapid progression to cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and death.

This is why we list hepatitis C coinfection as an OI on our OI page -- and it's also why the CDC discusses it, in detail, in its Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents.

Offline newt

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #24 on: May 24, 2011, 04:52:59 PM »
OI or not, it's a slow-burn condition, hep C, a fair few people clear it after 6 months to a year on their own, treatment for hep C works often, even if it takes 2 goes, and treatment is getting much, much better. Just lay off the beer and ouzo.

This is not to say hep C can't be serious, especially with HIV added in to the mix, but please don't panic. You have much time to consider your options, and even change your mind, eg about treatment/no treatment for hep C and/or starting HIV treatment sooner rather than later << this seems protective of the liver.

 - matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline BJS2011

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #25 on: May 25, 2011, 02:35:42 AM »
I got news today that I have tested positive for Hepatitis C. My doctor's office phoned and left a message for me to drop by and get an order for more blood work. It indicated that he was doing a viral load test for Hep C. I assume this is so he can determine the amount of it in my blood and potentially what source of treatment to prescribe.

I didn't really get to meet with him today. I have been relatively trouble free except my last two blood reports showed elevated liver enzymes. He did not seem real concerned at first but wanted to screen for Hep C to see if it was medicines I am on that was causing it.

Right now, I am pretty scared to death although I know this is not anything to get overly stressed at the moment since stress is the least  thing I need to deal with right now.
Don't worry to much. I got hep C at 18 and HIV at 30. I am now 42. NEVER had a problem with my liver counts. I did quit drinking and drugs though which is a must unless you want liver failure. Other than some fatigue from Hep C I am great. Don't worry you are going to be just fine but please no drugs or booze or you will have trouble big time. Stay well and positive my friend

Anyone who can share words of wisdom or advice who may be dealing with this too along with their HIV infection is most welcomed!



Offline tednlou2

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #26 on: May 25, 2011, 11:57:28 PM »
I've been noticing there's been several HCV stories on the poz.com homepage lately about the 2 new drugs and studies on cirrhosis risk, and taking additional interferon with HIV co-infection .  There are 2 stories about Hep C on the homepage right now.  It seems like there are more positive stories lately.     

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2011, 11:15:18 AM »
Thanks for the heads up. Definitely will check them out.

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C cleared
« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2011, 07:18:05 PM »
 :) Great news for my hep c issue. I talked with my doctor on Friday and I apparently cleared it on my own. I really appreciate all of the information and support this forum and you all have offered.

My latest CD4 was 524 and still undetectable. Diagnosed in 1993.

Offline next2u

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2011, 07:27:02 PM »
how was it determined you cleared it on your own? just curious :)
midapr07 - seroconversion
sept07 - tested poz
oct07 cd4 1013; vl 13,900; cd4% 41
feb08 cd4  694;  vl 16,160; cd4% 50.1
may08 cd4 546; vl 91,480; cd4% 32
aug08 cd4 576; vl 48,190; cd4% 40.7
dec08 cd4 559; vl 63,020; cd4% 29.4
feb09 cd4 464; vl 11,000; cd4% 26
may09 cd4 544; vl 29,710; cd4% 27.2
oct09 cd4 ...; vl 23,350; cd4% 31.6
mar10 cd4 408; vl 59,050; cd4% 31.4
aug10 cd4 328; vl 80,000; cd4% 19.3 STARTED ATRIPLA
oct10 cd4 423; vl 410 ;); cd4% 30.2
jun11 cd4 439; vl <20 ;); cd4% 33.8 <-Undetectable!
mar12 cd4 695; vl ud; cd4% 38.6
jan13 cd4 738; vl ud; cd4% 36.8
aug13 cd4 930; vl ud; cd4% 44.3
jan14 cd4 813; vl ud; cd4% 42.8
may14 cd4 783; vl *; cd4%43.5

Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2011, 07:44:01 AM »
:) Great news for my hep c issue. I talked with my doctor on Friday and I apparently cleared it on my own. I really appreciate all of the information and support this forum and you all have offered.

My latest CD4 was 524 and still undetectable. Diagnosed in 1993.

Great news, PiA! You're fantastically lucky. Just try to be careful that you don't get exposed to hep C again. And make sure your hep B vaccinations are up to date.

how was it determined you cleared it on your own? just curious :)

D, up to 20% of people will clear hep C on their own. This is determined through testing. Once someone has had hep C, they will always test hep C antibody positive. However, if the infection has been cleared, they will not have a hep C viral load. This is true for both people who self-clear and for those who have cleared it through treatment.

As people with hep C normally have very high VLs (particularly in comparison to hiv), it's pretty easy to know if they've cleared or not. You don't normally find people with untreated hep C with small viral loads (ie 10,000) like you do with hiv. Hep C VLs are commonly in the hundreds of thousands, if not millions.

If you have further questions, D, see the links I provided in post #9.
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #31 on: June 13, 2011, 06:25:24 PM »
Yes, Next2u. I cleared the virus on my own. It was determined when my doctor did a viral load test for the Hep C virus.

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #32 on: June 13, 2011, 06:26:03 PM »
Thanks Ann. Follow up question. I know I have the antibodies for the Hep C virus, does that mean I can infect others?

Offline next2u

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #33 on: June 13, 2011, 08:30:11 PM »
thanks ann. that's what i was looking for.

also, if someone has cleared their hep c infection can they still pass it to others?
midapr07 - seroconversion
sept07 - tested poz
oct07 cd4 1013; vl 13,900; cd4% 41
feb08 cd4  694;  vl 16,160; cd4% 50.1
may08 cd4 546; vl 91,480; cd4% 32
aug08 cd4 576; vl 48,190; cd4% 40.7
dec08 cd4 559; vl 63,020; cd4% 29.4
feb09 cd4 464; vl 11,000; cd4% 26
may09 cd4 544; vl 29,710; cd4% 27.2
oct09 cd4 ...; vl 23,350; cd4% 31.6
mar10 cd4 408; vl 59,050; cd4% 31.4
aug10 cd4 328; vl 80,000; cd4% 19.3 STARTED ATRIPLA
oct10 cd4 423; vl 410 ;); cd4% 30.2
jun11 cd4 439; vl <20 ;); cd4% 33.8 <-Undetectable!
mar12 cd4 695; vl ud; cd4% 38.6
jan13 cd4 738; vl ud; cd4% 36.8
aug13 cd4 930; vl ud; cd4% 44.3
jan14 cd4 813; vl ud; cd4% 42.8
may14 cd4 783; vl *; cd4%43.5

Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #34 on: June 14, 2011, 09:30:16 AM »
Thanks Ann. Follow up question. I know I have the antibodies for the Hep C virus, does that mean I can infect others?

thanks ann. that's what i was looking for.

also, if someone has cleared their hep c infection can they still pass it to others?

No, silly boys. You can't pass on something you do not have. (Why do I feel like I'm in "Am I"?) ;D
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Ann

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    • Num is sum qui mentiar tibi?
Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #35 on: June 14, 2011, 09:33:58 AM »
And by the way, PiA, having antibodies for hep C does not mean that you cannot get it again, unlike with hep B. Be careful that you are not exposed again, next time you might not be so lucky. And like I said earlier, make sure your hep B vaccinations are up-to-date. You don't want hep B either. :)
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline pozinathens

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #36 on: June 14, 2011, 11:32:53 AM »
Thanks!  :)

Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #37 on: June 14, 2011, 11:36:14 AM »
Thanks!  :)

You're more than welcome. :-*
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline metekrop

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #38 on: June 14, 2011, 12:40:45 PM »
Yes, Next2u. I cleared the virus on my own. It was determined when my doctor did a viral load test for the Hep C virus.

Is this true for Hep B too?  I remember I was diagnosed positive for Hep B many years a ago and told that there is no meds to get it cured.  Now when I was doing treatment for my Hiv, I am told that I am negative for Hep B.  Does it mean that it is cleared on its own? 
Diag on Dec 8, 2000, CD 440 VL 44K, No Meds
Dec/08 - Feb/09 CD< 50 & VL >500k hosp'z.
St. Atripla - July/09 CD 179, VL 197k
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Mar/11 CD 636 UD, Ch 201
Aug/11 CD 530 UD, Ch 98
Jan/12 cd 616 UD, ch 189
Jul/12 CD 640 UD, Ch ?
Dec/12 CD 669 Ud, Ch 125
May/7 CD711 Ud, Ch?
Nov/ 22 663 UD, Ch,
April 17 CD 797,
Oct, 14 CD 810 UD

Offline wolfter

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #39 on: June 14, 2011, 01:03:06 PM »
Is this true for Hep B too?  I remember I was diagnosed positive for Hep B many years a ago and told that there is no meds to get it cured.  Now when I was doing treatment for my Hiv, I am told that I am negative for Hep B.  Does it mean that it is cleared on its own? 

I am anxious to see the comments.  I have asked that question many times and even my doctor doesn't explain it to my satisfaction.  I tested positive for Hep B in 1991 and I argued about the diagnosis even back then.  Bill and I both worked in the health care field and were both totally aware of the only means of transmission so it caused some issues since he knew I wasn't an iv drug user.  So I lived with the belief for 19 years that I had suffered from this infection.  2 years ago, my new id doctor suggested the vaccination against it.  I reminded him of my previous diagnosis and after another blood check, he confirmed I never had the infection.
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline Solo_LTSurvivor

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2011, 02:00:18 PM »
I am anxious to see the comments.  I have asked that question many times and even my doctor doesn't explain it to my satisfaction.  I tested positive for Hep B in 1991 and I argued about the diagnosis even back then.  Bill and I both worked in the health care field and were both totally aware of the only means of transmission so it caused some issues since he knew I wasn't an iv drug user.  So I lived with the belief for 19 years that I had suffered from this infection.  2 years ago, my new id doctor suggested the vaccination against it.  I reminded him of my previous diagnosis and after another blood check, he confirmed I never had the infection.

Soon after HBV enters the body, it infects cells in the liver called hepatocytes. In response to this infection, the immune system targets the virus and the hepatocytes already infected with the virus. This causes inflammation of the liver (hepatitis).

HBV can cause acute hepatitis, meaning short-term inflammation of the liver, until the immune system is able to clear the virus from the body, usually within six months of becoming infected with the virus. However, HBV can become a chronic infection.

This means that the immune system is not able to get rid of the virus within six months after infection. In other words, the virus continues to reproduce in the personís liver for several months or years after infection. This can increase the risk of liver damage and liver cancer. Whatís more, someone with chronic HBV infection can transmit the virus to others.

The risk of chronic infection depends highly on whether a person is infected as an infant, child or adult. About 90 percent of infants infected with HBV go on to experience chronic hepatitis B. Between 25 to 50 percent of children ages 1 to 5 who are infected with HBV will remain chronically infected with the virus. By contrast, nearly 95 percent of adults recover completely from HBV infection and do not become chronically infected.

Some adults infected with HBV are more likely to clear the virus during the acute phase of the infection than others. For example, patients who have impaired immune responses, who are recovering from organ transplants, who are undergoing chemotherapy or dialysis for kidney problems, who are receiving steroid therapy to suppress the immune system, or who are HIV positive are more likely to develop chronic HBV infection than patients with normal immune responses.

Taken from here

I speak as someone who has had both Hep A and Hep B and cleared both with no treatment.  I test core antibody Hep B positive, which basically means that I had it at some point in the past.
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____________________________

Seroconverted: Early 80s
Tested & confirmed what I already knew: early 90s

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Last regimen:  Epzicom, Sustiva (since its inception with NO adverse side effects: no vivid dreams and NONE of the problems people who can't tolerate this drug may experience: color me lucky ::))
Past regimens
Fun stuff (in the past):  HAV/HBV, crypto, shingles, AIDS, PCP

Jan 2012: 818/21%
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Offline wolfter

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2011, 03:22:29 PM »
Thanks for the info.  I'm just trying to piece together what could have occurred that I didn't test positive for the HB antigen 19 years after the supposed infection.  I was in the hospital for several months with multiple organ failures.  In the grand scope of things, it's not of great importance, I'd just like to solve the riddle of what actually was occurring and what produced a false positive back 91 and mimicked the symptoms.
Complacency is the enemy.  ;)  Challenge yourself daily for maximum  return on investment.

Offline BJS2011

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #42 on: June 15, 2011, 10:00:22 AM »
I got news today that I have tested positive for Hepatitis C. My doctor's office phoned and left a message for me to drop by and get an order for more blood work. It indicated that he was doing a viral load test for Hep C. I assume this is so he can determine the amount of it in my blood and potentially what source of treatment to prescribe.

I didn't really get to meet with him today. I have been relatively trouble free except my last two blood reports showed elevated liver enzymes. He did not seem real concerned at first but wanted to screen for Hep C to see if it was medicines I am on that was causing it.

Right now, I am pretty scared to death although I know this is not anything to get overly stressed at the moment since stress is the least  thing I need to deal with right now.Hey there. I have been Hep C for 24 yrs. I drank and drugged in excess for 15 of those yrs. I have NEVER had any kind of trouble with my liver. My blood work is always normal. The only thing is I have developed alot of fatigue the last couple yrs. You can live with this for ever. DON'T DRINK ALCOHOL!!!! That will kill you and fast.Don't do drugs and try to quit ciggies. Don't be to worried. You will bwe fine. Just take good care of yourself. Oh I have hasd HIV for 12 yrs and doing excellent. Take carer and be well           Anyone who can share words of wisdom or advice who may be dealing with this too along with their HIV infection is most welcomed!



Offline Ann

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Re: Hepatitis C
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2011, 08:29:48 AM »
I have been Hep C for 24 yrs. I drank and drugged in excess for 15 of those yrs. I have NEVER had any kind of trouble with my liver. My blood work is always normal. The only thing is I have developed alot of fatigue the last couple yrs. You can live with this for ever. DON'T DRINK ALCOHOL!!!! That will kill you and fast.Don't do drugs and try to quit ciggies. Don't be to worried. You will bwe fine. Just take good care of yourself. Oh I have hasd HIV for 12 yrs and doing excellent. Take carer and be well           Anyone who can share words of wisdom or advice who may be dealing with this too along with their HIV infection is most welcomed!

Pozinathens does not have hep C - he cleared the virus on his own, the lucky so-and-so.

BJ, you need to know that your liver enzymes will not always be elevated when you have hep C ("My blood work is always normal"), but that doesn't mean there isn't damage going on. When I had hep C, my liver enzymes were only elevated once, but my liver biopsy showed a considerable amount of damage (I don't remember exactly what stage it was, but I think it was three or four).

You might want to discuss your hep C options with your doctor. Fatigue is one of the leading symptoms of hcv infection, so if you're dealing with fatigue, it may be time to act. You may not have to have a biopsy (uncomfortable procedure, but doable) as there are newer techniques in use today and you can read about them here.

You should also check out the hivandhepatitis.com website. It's the best one out there as far as I am aware. There are also very good Hep C Lessons at our sister-website Hepmag.com

Your statement "You can live with this for ever" isn't really true. Hep C is one of the leading causes of liver cancer and liver transplant in the US. It's a very serious illness and more so when one is coinfected with hiv, as hiv will accelerate hcv disease progression. Not drinking or drugging will certainly help, but it's not the be-all and end-all of dealing with hcv. Please find out exactly how well your liver is doing. As I said earlier, not having elevated liver enzymes does not necessarily mean there is no damage present. If you continue to ignore your liver, you may regret it one day and I hope that doesn't happen.


edited to fix broken link
« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 08:34:09 AM by Ann »
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

 


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