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Author Topic: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs  (Read 13869 times)

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Online Jeff G

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #50 on: December 24, 2010, 03:23:08 PM »
I'm used to seeing it now but it used to amaze me how a person can come into a forum and post a question expecting an answer while refusing to answer any thing asked of them .    

Next he probably will get angry at us for trying to help him by asking pertinent questions .  
« Last Edit: December 24, 2010, 03:59:40 PM by jg1962 »

Offline Zohar

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #51 on: December 24, 2010, 03:30:07 PM »
Newt said: ''TDM is free on the NHS''.

Thanks for that information, Newt. It's very helpful.  I will definitely ask my doctor about it at my next appointment.
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #52 on: December 24, 2010, 03:54:23 PM »
And yet on the Poz forum blog, which was linked in this thread above, someone has written about taking Atripla one week on, one week off successfully for three years with their doctor's knowledge, so it doesn't seem to be quite as black and white as some would argue.

So if that person represents one story out of, say, a hundred and the other 99 all show resistance issues what does that tell you about your cherry picking of anecdotal bullcrap?
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline leatherman

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #53 on: December 24, 2010, 05:15:33 PM »
Why aren't you worried about the VERY possible long-term issue of developing resistance to Truvada
Side effects are often in the mind, not the body, the drugs, depsite the reporting, are mainly not toxic, short term or long term. People like to think they are tho,
not to mention that by reading the package insert, literature and further studies, one can see that only a percentage (a smaller not larger percentage) of people usually have long or short term side effects. I'm not a gambler in the least but expecting side effects/long term issues seems like a very negative attitude to take towards one's medications, IMHO. Of course, some reports/studies have indicated that negative attitudes can lead to poor adherence issues. ;)
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline Zohar

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #54 on: December 24, 2010, 06:44:35 PM »
not to mention that by reading the package insert, literature and further studies, one can see that only a percentage (a smaller not larger percentage) of people usually have long or short term side effects.[/b] I'm not a gambler in the least but expecting side effects/long term issues seems like a very negative attitude to take towards one's medications, IMHO. Of course, some reports/studies have indicated that negative attitudes can lead to poor adherence issues. ;)

Yes, I agree that only a small percentage of people suffer side effects.

Unfortunately, I've been one of them.
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

Offline leatherman

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #55 on: December 24, 2010, 08:06:02 PM »
Unfortunately, I've been one of them.
oh, I understand. I read through your posting history. ;)

Personally, I've only had a couple rashes and not much else in the way of side effects over the years. Oh, except for the terrible daily barfing everyday that caused me to totally quit and give up on the meds three times - which of course led to lots of problems (ending up in the hospital!) and resistance. I myself have gone through 15 or so ARVs searching for the right combo that would not only keep me alive, but be the right combo that I could actually live with (ie no side effects).

It was a long hard search too. It took me 10 yrs to reach undetectable and once I found an acceptable regimen (ie only barfing 6 times a month instead of 30 days a month), it took another 5 yrs to get through blips and reach a stable UD and stable cd4s in the 250-300 range. A pleasant "side effect" of sticking to the same regimen for these last 5 yrs (even though at first it still caused me to throw up occasionally), was that now that it had kept me stable this long, I have quit throwing up too! (that's only happened 3 times in the last 2 yrs now. WooHoo!)


you keep switching meds, right? switching to find a combo without side effects, right?
then it just seems that already "cheating" this newest regimen before it's even had a chance to produce the side effects :D seems counter-productive to finding out how well it will work for you and whether it will produce short or long-term side effects.

quoting you from a previous thread:
He *your doctor* seems to think that things will settle down in time and that it's worth sticking with this regime for the time being. I have to say, I'm not passionate about staying on these particular drugs, but given that I've experienced side effects on three regimes to date, there's a fairly high chance I'd have problems on other treatments.
see there's that negative attitude even back in Aug. :D Just because you have side effects on 3 regimes is NOT a predictor of having side effects with other regimens. ;) That's also the exact same advice my doctor gave me and though I didn't believe it at first and it took some time, his advice turned out to be right. ;)

It is troubling to read about how you have had to deal with so many side effects. If I knew the perfect regimen for you, I'd sure point it out. It's also troubling to read about how many regimens you've already gone through. Though it's not like the early days when one med wouldn't work and there wouldn't be any more on the market, that doesn't mean that there are an endless amount for you to "try" in finding a perfect fit. (Heck I thought I found my perfect one when it only made me puke 6 times a month LOL and look now! I never puke and I'm healthier than I've been in 20 yrs - and it only took me taking it for 6 yrs for things to get that good. LOL)

Maybe you, like me, will have to deal with nausea (or those rashes/dry skin/etc that you have had also) for several years while the meds keep you stable long enough for your body to reach the proper equilibrium. Not everyone takes meds for 4 months and then never has issues again. Since you've had so many issues with so many regimens already (and you think because you've had problems that you will have problems), maybe you should also consider, like I had to with the barfing, as to how many side effects can you put up with in order to stay on ARVs to keep the HIV in check to not die. I mean, untreated HIV leads to AIDS and that leads to death, so treatment to stay alive is a given. You may have to make a quality vs quantity of life judgment on how much you can handle.

I really do hope you find the right regimen for you; but I still think that not even starting this regimen at the recommended dosage wasn't the best way to do it, just to avoid side effects that you "might" have had from this regimen.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline Zohar

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #56 on: December 24, 2010, 08:32:37 PM »
Thanks for that, leatherman.
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #57 on: December 25, 2010, 07:22:17 AM »
Due to concerns around side effects, I've been taking a half dose ...

Hi,

So you think that SE come in proportion with dosage ?

Since you have not been very specific,  would not know. Some SE are alllergic reactions. Would dosage matter then?

Eric
NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline J.R.E.

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #58 on: December 25, 2010, 08:29:22 PM »
Hi,

Some SE are alllergic reactions.
Eric


UUmmmmm,... I don't know about that Eric.  There's a difference between having side effects, and having an allergic reaction.  At least, that's the way I always understood it :


http://www.ehow.com/how_5433813_differentiate-reaction-side-effects-medications.html
Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

 As of 8/2514,  t-cells are at 402, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 11%

  
 62 years young.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #59 on: December 25, 2010, 11:19:39 PM »
There's a difference between having side effects, and having an allergic reaction.
http://www.ehow.com/how_5433813_differentiate-reaction-side-effects-medications.html
Quote
Then, this triggers symptoms of an allergic reaction, which may range from scattered hives , nausea and vomiting,or itchininess.
I disagree with that article. Hives, nausea, vomiting and itchiness can be temporary side effects OR long term side effects OR allergic reactions. the only difference can be the length of time dealing with the effect and/or the severity.

Ziagen and it's rash at 14 days, which is usually a side effect, is an example that comes to mind. For some people it's a temp side effect (as it was for me when I took it); for other people it is a severe allergic reaction and they have to immediately stop the med or risk death. The difference is the severity and the duration. In other cases many people vomit during the first few weeks as their bodies adjust to the chemical levels rising in their systems not as symptom of an allergic reaction.

frequently, with HIV meds, doctors instruct their patients to live with or deal with many of those listed effects for a short time period before being able to determine (by severity and duration) whether the symptom/issue is a side effect (short term or long term) or an allergic reaction.

I do think Eric is partially correct about what he pointed out. Those side effects Zohar is worried about having could actually not be side effects that a dosage change might effect; but could be an allergic reaction that he would have no matter what dose. Although even that premise is slightly flawed, as some allergic reactions can be mitigated with a lower dosage. (for example, a full dose of Bactrim causes me to have Hives as an allergic reaction to the sulfa drug; however a half dosage does not produce the same rash; but just mild itchiness - so a dosage change can make a difference)

of course, for all of these issues, I believe the guidance of a licensed, trained, experienced doctor (your doc or the ER doc) advising on the side effect (and knowing about the dosage change ;) ) is of utmost important to truly deal with these kinds of issues.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #60 on: December 26, 2010, 05:55:56 AM »
Hi,

Some posters have been wondering of Zohar had sought medical advise before reducing this daily dose of Truvada or if he has done that of his own accord.

Whichever...  It does not matter... he could just as well not tell us the whole story or not tell his doc the whole story. There may be some reason why he did not asked his doc.

Docs go on vacations, some go along well with you, some don't, some will give you time (mine does) , some won't.

Whichever...  It does not matter... Because the good news is that AT LEAST, he posted his question here. Let's do him the favor to try to understand the underlying issues here.

Some people simply drop the meds and drop off medical care (because the SE are unbearable), some people simply do not go on meds for fear of SE, some people go on the wrong meds for fear of SE (of the other choices)
At least, they find here a place to talk about it. Freely.

If he did reduce the Truvada dosage and thought it is a safe thing to do, why would he go further and consider reducing the dose of his PI  (and not that of the Truvada)? And if he did consider reducing the dose of his PI, why ask
doc or this forum for permission ? Why reduce the dosage of Truvada to start with (and why not the dosage of the PI)

May be he felt that it was 'safer' to play with the Truvada dosage First. We know, for almost certain, that he has played the Russian roulette before.

May be he felt that if the Truvada dosage did work on him (I am not implying that I think it did...) that was because the PI monotherapy ( a venue that has been explored and still being explored by some researchers)
(in my views, taking half a dose , 3/4 of a dose, 1/4 of a dose without proper monitoring equates taking no dose, at best) works for him (or, let's say has not yet shown failure)

And if so, then, the reason why it might have worked for him, is exactly because the PI was the pillar holding the roof of this little personal laboratory (himself).

This world is so much full of DO this, DON'T do that, that some people just start ignoring the warnings.

But as they keep playing the Russian roulette the stakes go up.

To the demise of the player

To the amusement of bystanders

Cheers

Eric

 

    
« Last Edit: December 26, 2010, 05:59:47 AM by eric48 »
NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline Ann

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #61 on: December 26, 2010, 10:56:00 AM »

To the amusement of bystanders
   

We are not amused.
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #62 on: December 26, 2010, 11:14:08 AM »
We are not amused.

(A quotation, attributed to Queen Victoria)

I suppose that is because we are not just bystanders.

Zohar: you got that ?  We are not amused.

Keep us posted on your on going thoughts

Eric

NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline bocker3

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2010, 02:43:15 PM »
(in my views, taking half a dose , 3/4 of a dose, 1/4 of a dose without proper monitoring equates taking no dose, at best)

Unfortunately this isn't really true -- taking no dose will not cause the virus to mutate and become resistant, while taking a sub-optimal dose most certainly DOES run that risk.

Also, to be clear, Zohar does not need anyone's "permission" to do what he's doing, not sure where you pulled that from.  We are on here, not to judge, but to point out the danger.

Mike
Atripla - Started 12/05
Reyataz/Norvir - Added 6/06
Labs - Pre-Meds
Sep05 T=350/25% VL98,559
Nov05 288/18%  47,564
Current Labs
May2013 691/31% <20

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #64 on: December 26, 2010, 05:17:52 PM »
Agreed - Eric
NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #65 on: January 15, 2011, 01:13:33 AM »
Zohar,
I have no experience trying this, however common sense tells me at some point in the not too far distant future you are likely to have resistance problems. If you are having problems with side effects, my own but less experienced opinion is:
(a) this should be discussed with your doctor before you begin to unilaterally alter and create your own dosages
(b) I know the combo pills offer the convenience of one pill a day dosing however maybe you should consider taking a drug that requires you to take it twice a day or you can try to space out the doses of you meds as opposed to taking them at the same time. The only problem with doing it like this is it increases ones chance of missing doses because of the more variances added to the times one take meds. For example, I am taking intellence which is 2 pills a day twelve hours apart and Epivir which is available in a once a day 300mg pill or twice a day 150mg pill. I opted for the lower dose and spread them out 12 hrs. My regimen, which is not for just anybody cause it requires a strong level of commitment and effort to maintain, looks like this:
6am = intelence
10am = epivir
2pm = viread
6pm = intelence
10pm = epivir
I have yet to feel any side effects worth mentioning <knock on wood>

Also, I don't know if I'm right or not but I kind of get the sense you like to be in control of things around you. I am the same way in that I hate having decisions made for myself by others (doctors, etc). I found I had alot of energy after my diagnosis of being different, wanting more control but less comformaty. But I've learned to try to respect the medical guidelines set by health professionals and instead found something I could channel this creative energy towards and make it benefit my health. Vitamins! I'm not going to be a vita-pusher but it has done wonders for me over the past 2 months. The shear vitamin pill count (107) and cost /day ($17) would be considered well over the top to most and I would agree with them until the past few months when I dug in and studied these things. If you were to look at the vitamin regimen I built, you would see a dual & complete coverage of all the main vitamins & minerals. I designed it with the intentions of  giving my body the best chance to thrive during HIV treatment to help maintain my cholesterol, blood sugar, brain support, liver support, lower inflamation, bone and joint support, heart support, kidney and prostate support, a handful of amino acids and giving my body a variety of antioxidents to keep free radicals clear. I stayed away from virtually all herbs (except for Turmeric, Bacopa and Cinnamon) though as many of them are not as proven. Now add in 5 different dosage times for these vitamins a day to help keep all the supplements bio-available longer throughout the day and there you have it, something I'm extremely proud to have designed for myself. I even balanced between the 5 doses the supplements that block one anothers absorption and take 1 black pepper extract per dosing time to increase the absorbtion of all supplements.

Sorry to ramble on like that. Hopefully that helps, just don't play dr with HIV meds and work closely with your dr when wanting to make any changes to the prescribed and agreed upon treatment plan. Try to find something to channel your energies in, wheather that is a hobby, health and fitness, whatever works for you.
Best wishes!!!
Gary
« Last Edit: January 15, 2011, 01:51:08 AM by legolas613 »
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #66 on: January 15, 2011, 09:17:46 AM »
I fail to understand why you are spacing out your med intake.  What's the logic in this?
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline Ann

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #67 on: January 15, 2011, 10:45:18 AM »
I fail to understand why you are spacing out your med intake.  What's the logic in this?

If I'm reading him correctly, I think he thinks doing it his way decreases his chances of having side effects. I'm not so sure it works like that. With the combo he's on, he most likely wouldn't be having side effects even if he took them like most people do.
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Inchlingblue

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #68 on: January 15, 2011, 11:25:31 AM »
If I'm reading him correctly, I think he thinks doing it his way decreases his chances of having side effects. I'm not so sure it works like that. With the combo he's on, he most likely wouldn't be having side effects even if he took them like most people do.

It might also not be side effects per se but the legitimate concern that long-term use of any of these meds can be hard on the kidneys and/or liver as well as other biological functions on the cellular level. It stands to reason that the smaller the dose the less of an impact on our bodies.  

The trick is to achieve that sweet spot wherein the meds are still working at keeping HIV at bay while having as minimal an impact on our bodies as possible.

No less of an AIDS activist than Larry Kramer has stated that he believes the recommended one-size-fits-all dosing of HIV meds is too high for many people.

There are advances being made, such as with nanoparticles that could possibly address this issue in the near future. In the meantime it's a bit of a crap shoot, especially without the use of TDM to help guide a decision.

I'd love to be able to take lower doses that still work but I hesitate to take the risk at this time.

LINK:

http://blogs.poz.com/shawn/archives/2008/08/paging_dr_larry.html

Offline Ann

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #69 on: January 15, 2011, 11:32:38 AM »
It stands to reason that the smaller the dose the less of an impact on our bodies. 

He's not taking smaller doses. He's just spacing all his meds out throughout the day. He's taking the standard amount of Epivir for a 24 hour period, he's just taking 150mgs twice a day instead of 300mgs once a day.

By the way, you do understand that we're talking about Legolas's post, don't you?
Condoms are a girl's best friend

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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Inchlingblue

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #70 on: January 15, 2011, 11:46:55 AM »
He's not taking smaller doses. He's just spacing all his meds out throughout the day. He's taking the standard amount of Epivir for a 24 hour period, he's just taking 150mgs twice a day instead of 300mgs once a day.

By the way, you do understand that we're talking about Legolas's post, don't you?

I didn't realize that. I don't fully understand what Legolas is doing nor why he's doing it either, lol.

I thought we were discussing the merits of wanting to take less medication, which is what the OP is doing or wanting to do.

In the words of Emily Litella, "nevermind."

LINK:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3FnpaWQJO0

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #71 on: January 15, 2011, 05:14:09 PM »
It might also not be side effects per se but the legitimate concern that long-term use of any of these meds can be hard on the kidneys and/or liver as well as other biological functions on the cellular level. It stands to reason that the smaller the dose the less of an impact on our bodies.

Hello,
I space my meds for 2 reasons:
(a) it makes logical sense to me that doses of any kind let alone HIV meds stand to be more tollerable if taken in smaller doses (if possible) and their intake spread over a timeframe to still accomplish the required daily intake. For example if your doctor said he wanted you to take 12 aspirin a day, would you take them in smaller doses throughout the day or all at once? Which method of intake would cause less strain on internal organs? Obviously 12 aspirin at once is illogical but it is the max safe dose/day. I'm just trying to make the point by breaking up the dosages of aspirin (makes sense the same would apply to any other medicine) into smaller amounts but multiple times a day to meet the needed total intake can be less stressful to internal organs yet should be just as effective in accomplishing the goal.

(b) it fits perfectly with the vitamin regimen I was already doing before I started meds; 5 time slots to take my vitamins/supplements and also 5 total doses of HIV meds.

Hope that clarifies my thoughts on my regimen better.
 
The reason smaller/multiple doses (if available) and single meds that also have a combo available are generally not freely offered by doctors openly is because they are afraid of people missing doses and becoming resistant. The more complexity to an HIV dosage regimen, the more opportunity there is too fail. That is why Atripla, Truvada, Epzicom and the new quad are being pushed so hard by doctors, it simplifies things and creates an increased chance for most to have treatment success.

Ann, that is an interesting point you make on some thinking HIV recommended doses are too high for some people. I too have wondered about that also. Can you imagine if we all were to go shoe shopping and they only had one size shoe of each style for all to buy, lol.
--Gary
« Last Edit: January 15, 2011, 05:47:39 PM by legolas613 »
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #72 on: January 15, 2011, 08:58:31 PM »
aspirin isn't the same as ARV
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #73 on: January 15, 2011, 10:02:55 PM »
Of coarse not. I was merely using it as an example. HIV meds and other meds/drugs can be broken up so long as the target dose per day is met and in the case of HIV meds as they broken up in a balanced way; same dose amount evenly spread throughout the day (every 6/8/12 hours).
« Last Edit: January 15, 2011, 10:07:57 PM by legolas613 »
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #74 on: January 15, 2011, 10:17:52 PM »
You got a link for that claim?
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #75 on: January 15, 2011, 11:51:29 PM »
I don't have a link at hand but I know I have read multiple times from trials that 2 dosing times to achieve the daily dose of an HIV drug vs. the same drug given at it's once day strength (if available or approved once a day) is slightly more effective. It's not a big difference but is probably a little more effective than the trials suggest because adherance to multiple dosing times is not easily achieved by everyone, as I'm sure some people in those trials had some kind of adherance problem. I think reyataz was one but there are others I've read about. Also isentress recently abandoned it's effort to create it into a once a day formulation because trials were proving that the 1 dose a day was not being as effective (and it must not have been too close if they abandoned it) as the twice a day regimen.
--Gary   
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline buginme2

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #76 on: January 16, 2011, 12:44:30 AM »
Are you taking into account the half life of the medications you are taking and ny reducing the dosage and spreading them out you are reducing the amount of medication circulating? Just a thought.  Good luck

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #77 on: January 16, 2011, 04:37:33 AM »
Are you taking into account the half life of the medications you are taking and ny reducing the dosage and spreading them out you are reducing the amount of medication circulating?
It is dangerous to unilaterally change approved dosages of any HIV med. One should always make decisions about ones daily HIV regimen with their doctor. Epivir is a good example, I chose to get the 150mg tablets twice a day as opposed to the once a day Epivir of 300mg. There are also many meds split into 2 daily doses that don't have a once a day option. Everyone should do what they feel is best for themselves and keep doses within approved amounts (not cutting pills) already available and for most people that also means building as simple of a regimen as possible. It's ok to think outside the box concerning your HIV meds but only so long as you stay within the box (approved guidelines or your dr's ok).
take care
--Gary
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 07:38:38 AM by legolas613 »
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #78 on: January 16, 2011, 10:26:01 AM »
I don't have a link at hand but I know I have read multiple times from trials that 2 dosing times to achieve the daily dose of an HIV drug vs. the same drug given at it's once day strength (if available or approved once a day) is slightly more effective. It's not a big difference but is probably a little more effective than the trials suggest because adherance to multiple dosing times is not easily achieved by everyone, as I'm sure some people in those trials had some kind of adherance problem. I think reyataz was one but there are others I've read about. Also isentress recently abandoned it's effort to create it into a once a day formulation because trials were proving that the 1 dose a day was not being as effective (and it must not have been too close if they abandoned it) as the twice a day regimen.
--Gary  

So, since all things aren't equal with each ARV you basically don't really know what you're talking about.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline Ann

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #79 on: January 16, 2011, 10:42:57 AM »
Gary, do you realise that when you post in all italics and bold, your posts are kinda difficult to read? Especially your larger paragraphs.
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Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #80 on: January 16, 2011, 03:03:33 PM »
Gary, do you realise that when you post in all italics and bold, your posts are kinda difficult to read? Especially your larger paragraphs.
Sorry about that Ann, it is my default preference but I'll try to limit it going forward.
Take care
--Gary
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline legolas613

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #81 on: January 16, 2011, 03:13:53 PM »
So, since all things aren't equal with each ARV you basically don't really know what you're talking about.
I never said anything was equal in regards to the ARV treatments. Actually I've done my best to explain my thoughts and opinions, if you still don't understand me or maybe you just don't want to understand me and are just trying to find fault in what I say. I know HIV is a "crap shoot", I'm within guidlines and only advocate staying within them. My regimen choice and dosing schedule and vitamin supplemention may be out of the mainstream, but I'm very happy and confident with the direction of my treatment.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 03:16:50 PM by legolas613 »
2009 Oct -- infected.
2009 Nov -- seroconverted.
2010 Feb -- tested HIV+. 
2010 Feb -- CD4=457,33% VL/WBC=3.8k/4.4
2010 Dec -- CD4=568,40% VL/WBC=3.6k/3.7
2011 Jan -- HLA B5071 test +; couldn't use Ziagen.
2011 Jan -- began Viread, Epivir and Intellence.
2011 May -- CD4=409,43% VL/WBC=UD/3.8
2011 Aug -- CD4=404,44% VL/WBC=8.8k/4.0
2011 Sept -- switched to Truvada & boosted Prezista. CD4 suppression, SE and adherance issues.
2011 Nov -- CD4=522,49% VL/WBC=2.3k/3.5
2012 Jan -- discontinued meds. SE and adherance issues, deciding on new regimen.
2012 Feb -- resistance testing revealed mutations: 3 NRTI (incl K65R), 4 NNRTI and 3 PI's.
2012 Apr -- CD4=599,41% VL/WBC=263/3.8
2012 May -- Shingles
2012 Oct -- CD4=493,36% VL/WBC=4.7k/4.4 (still my latest Dr. visit as of 2/01/2014)

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #82 on: January 16, 2011, 05:56:10 PM »
My regimen choice and dosing schedule and vitamin supplemention may be out of the mainstream, but I'm very happy and confident with the direction of my treatment.

I kind of did the same for a while out of 2 concerns:

- both meds I take are eliminated through the liver and 'potentially' harmfull to ... the liver, so I spaced them at the beginning (I don't do that any more)

- the other is a competitive 'entry' between Abacavir (which I take) and insulin into the cell. There is one study about this, it confirms it, but it concluded also that it is not clinically significant. OK... not clinically significant because not everyone has insulin resistant, but I do...

Now that I am more than 6 months into the meds, it is less of a concern to me.

Eric
NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline Zohar

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #83 on: July 11, 2011, 05:09:56 PM »
Just thought I'd update this thread with the latest developments.

I actually didn't feel much better after being on a half dose of Truvada - that fatigue never really lifted in the way I was hoping it would. I mentioned my constant tiredness to my doctor at the time and he rolled his eyes and said 'The LAST thing we want to do is change your medication.'

Hmmmm....by this point I was pretty desperate, so a couple of weeks later I decided to drop Truvada altogether. Within about a few days, it was as if a fog had lifted and I began to feel better than I had done in ages.

I happened to be seeing a different doctor for another issue and after a few consultations we'd built up a very good rapport, so I decided to tell him. He was very laid-back about the whole thing and his first comment was 'Well, you're on the right drugs as we know this doesn't work with all PIs.' He then went on to mention a 5 year study called PIVOT, which is looking at people taking just Darunaviir and Norvir, which started in 2008 and closes at the end of 2013. He told me that the study's hope is that it will provide another treatment option for patients without the toxicities of taking Truvada long term. It would also be a cheaper regime to fund for the NHS.

My viral load has remained suppressed and he thinks there's a strong likelihood that it will remain so (which is why the PIVOT study was green lighted), and this is happy for me to continue on this regime and wrote me a prescription for a few more months.

Just to finish off by saying that I'm NOT encouraging people to monkey around with their treatment of their own accord and to speak to your doctor if you wish to modify/change your medications.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2011, 11:58:38 AM by Zohar »
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

Offline newt

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #84 on: July 11, 2011, 06:03:26 PM »
Good.

The test of treatment is a suppressed viral load so long may this continue on your mini-but-probably-strong-enough combo.

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #85 on: July 11, 2011, 07:07:51 PM »
I'm now considering taking lower doses of Darunavir and Norvir, but am undecided at this point.

This was in your original OP...

I think it was worth discussing this in this thread as well as with this new doctor that you have.

as described here:
http://www.iasusa.org/pub/topics/2010/issue3/104.pdf

(figure 6)

The Darunavir and Norvir is pivotal to you combo. it has a much higher potency index than truvada.

which is why it may make sense to try treatment simplification KEEPING the most potent drug and dropping the lesser potent. but, IMHO, not the otherway around.

What you are currently doing is pretty much like entering a clinical trial (you are in one intervention arm and have proper medical follow up), the only difference is that your personal experiment will not be aggregated with that of the real people who enter the real trial.

As long as you have proper medical supervision, I do no see any objection in you taking that risk.
After all, those who volunteered to enter the trial are taking that same risk (actually randomly risk is halved)

It is the lowering of Darunavir and Norvir, that you were originally considering, that could have been dangerous.

I think it was a good idea that you opened that discussion here and with this new doctor before attempting your original Darunavir/n lowering plans.

Hoping everything will go fine for you

Eric
NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline eric48

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #86 on: July 11, 2011, 08:38:36 PM »
a couple of weeks later I decided to drop Truvada altogether. Within about a few days, it was as if a fog had lifted and I began to feel better than I had done in ages.

Zohar,

this is all very interesting and I hope you will keep us posted.

While the PIVOT trial is still on going, the MONOI trial results are being analysed and published.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20802297

they are very encouraging, but, once again this is experimental and some other aspects need to be reviewed as discussed here :

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21150592

it is said there that:
The risk of resistance development is minimal and patients who fail this strategy can be re-suppressed again by adding nucleosides or switching to a triple therapy regimen without having lost therapeutic options.

I am sure you will feel reassured by that...

predicting which monotherapy maintenance strategy may have a chance to be successfull is no easy business (not every trial is successfull... see for exemple:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16267763


but some reseracher are digging hard into potency index not only as a whole, but potency index as per mutation in order to predict which monotherapy might have a chance to be successfull:

see Shen and Siliciano's

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088572/?tool=pubmed

DoseĖresponse curve slope is a missing dimension in the analysis of HIV-1 drug resistance

This is a complicated matter...

As your new doctor commented, it may be by chance that you where originally on the right drug (Darunavir/n) for this little experiment of yours...

I would certainly not have tried this on the combo I am on (NNRTI + 2 NRTI)

It may be by chance ... or, it may be because of what Shen and Siliciano's are currently demonstrating and is likely to change the paradigm of TRI-therapy (in the context of maintenance, that is after being UD for a while...)

Just some thoughts...

Definitively , please keep us posted

Eric

NVP/ABC/3TC/... UD; CD4 > 1000; CD4/CD8 ~ 2.0   safety stock : 3 months (2013: FOTO= 5d. ON 2d. OFF)

Offline Zohar

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Re: Reducing the dose of HIV drugs
« Reply #87 on: July 12, 2011, 09:31:41 AM »
I never did reduce the dose of Darunavir and Norvir. I just decided to cut out Truvada altogether and leave the doses of the other drugs at their prescribed level. I started another thread a few months ago about having constantly red eyes, and this stopped within a matter of days of dropping the Truvada. I often felt as if I was sort of hungover on the original combination and the red eyes made me look it too. I don't know whether my liver was struggling to process the Truvada, but, as I've said, I feel - and look- so much better now.

I'm due to see my doctor again in a couple of months.
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

 


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