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Author Topic: Thinking about moving back to the UK  (Read 4570 times)

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Offline Defarge

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Thinking about moving back to the UK
« on: July 31, 2010, 01:45:55 AM »
So, my partner and I are getting divorced (we're registered as domestic partners in CA)...we can't dissolve the relationship due to the financial situation. I've lived in the US for 13 years and was diagnosed as poz back in Feb, and started on meds (Viramune & Truvada) this past Tuesday. We'd planned on ending up in Europe within the next 3 years, which was exciting for me, as I've been wanting to be nearer my fanily for a while now. Obviously that plan no longer exists, so I'm considering moving back to the UK in the very near future...I'd move in with my mum to start off with, till I get back on my feet a bit...she lives in the countryside, so I doubt that the doctors there have got a whole lot of experience with HIV, though I'm not afraid of being a fearless advocate for myself and my needs. My question(s), therefore, are how is HIV treatment in the UK? Would the meds be covered under the NHS? I have a national insurance number as I'm a British subject (I'm a dual-national). Would I be entitled to any other kinds of benefits? Is there a good online resource I can tap into to find more info? Any other questions I should be asking...?

ox

Dan

Offline leese43

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 02:29:49 AM »
Hi Dan,

Sorry to hear your plans are having to change, I hope things go as smoothly as they can for you in the situation.

 I'm sure even while living "in the country" you'll be able to find a medical GU clinic at the local hospital, where hopefully you'll find a specialist or at least a doc that has some hiv knowledge. :)  All meds are covered under the NHS, there are no prescription charges for anything prescribed by the clinic.

Here's a link that may help with moving back. Good luck!

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/LivingintheUK/DG_4000140

Leese x
Oct 04 - Neg
Aug 05 - infected
Oct 05 - cd4 780, vl 60k
Apr 08 - cd4 430, vl 243
Jul 08 - cd4 550, vl 896
Nov 08 - cd4 730, vl 1.8k
May 09 - cd4 590, vl 1.5k
Sep 09 - cd4 460 vl 34k
Dec 09 - cd4 470 vl 42k
April 10 - cd4 430 vl 88.5k
July 10 - cd4 330 vl 118k
Aug 10 - started reyataz/truvada/norvir
Aug 10 - cd4 380 vl 4k (12 days after starting meds :))
Sep 10 - cd4 520 vl 1.5k
Oct 10 - cd4 590 vl 44
Jan 11 -cd4 610 vl <40 cd4% 50
May 11 - cd4 780 vl UD

Offline Ann

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2010, 06:49:59 AM »
You might also find this helpful - repatriation advice

As you've been living abroad for so long, I think you may have to wait for six months to be eligible for some medical services, but they won't make you wait for hiv services. Do a bit of online research now on what GUM clinics are available in your mum's area and do some research on the doctors who staff those clinics. Then get in touch with your choice either just before you move or just after, to make sure you can get the ball rolling with no treatment interruptions.

You might be wise to try to take a bit of a stockpile of meds with you, just because you never know what glitch may occur. Better safe than sorry.

You should also get as much information on your treatment history from diagnosis onward from your current doctor as you can and take this with you for your new doc. At the very least, get copies of all your labs since diagnosis.

Anyway, sorry to hear about your break-up. I hope things start looking up for you and your move and resettlement goes smoothly. Good luck!

Ann
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline mecch

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2010, 07:37:52 AM »
Oh shit, sorry about the divorce!
Wishing you new and wonderful adventures in the UK.
At least take comfort in that you are moving (back) to a country with universal health care.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2010, 06:22:33 PM »
Thank you guys...have bookmakrked those links & will look into it all. I fired off an email to the THT today, so waiting to hear back from them, too...

Offline anniebc

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2010, 04:20:24 AM »
As you've been living abroad for so long, I think you may have to wait for six months to be eligible for some medical services, .
Ann
[/quote

If he was born in the UK and is a citizen would this still apply?, it's been awhile since I've lived in the UK so the rules may have changed.

Defarge...Sorry to hear about your divorce, life sucks sometimes.

Hugs
Jan

« Last Edit: August 01, 2010, 04:22:14 AM by anniebc »
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Never knock on deaths door..ring the bell and run..he really hates that.

Offline Ann

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2010, 08:20:20 AM »
Jan, I think it does, from what I read on the site I linked him to. (if you've been away for a long time, you can't get all medical services for the first six months)
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2010, 06:17:23 AM »
You might be interested in the following information from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence - with sets rules and guidelines for treatment of all patients in the UK.

 The NICE National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK Guidelines for HIV/AIDS treatment is thus:
Antiretroviral treatment is initiated in secondary care or specialist centres. As a guide:

    * For primary HIV infection (HIV seroconversion illness), antiretroviral drug treatment should be routinely considered in people with:
          o Neurological involvement.
          o Any AIDS-defining illness.
          o A CD4 count persistently less than 200 cells/mm3 (that is for 3 months or more).
    * For established HIV infection, drug treatment should be initiated for:
          o People with a CD4 count less than 350 cells/mm3. This should be confirmed on at least one consecutive sample, in the absence of any obvious reason for transient CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion.
                + For information on initiating treatment in people with a CD4 count greater than 350 cells/mm3, see Additional information.
          o Pregnant women, to prevent transmission to the child. Treatment may be stopped after delivery.
          o Anyone with symptomatic disease, regardless of CD4 count

Additional information

    *
          o For people with a CD4 count greater than 350 cells/mm3, the British HIV Association Treatment Guidelines Writing Group recommends that antiretroviral treatment may be started or considered for a small group of people with the following conditions [Gazzard and BHIVA Treatment Guidelines Writing Group, 2008]:
                + AIDS diagnosis (for example Kaposi's sarcoma) or any HIV-related comorbidity.
                + Hepatitis B infection, where treatment of hepatitis B is indicated.
                + Hepatitis C infection in some cases, where treatment for hepatitis is deferred.
                + Low CD4 percentage (for example less than 14%, where Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis would be indicated).
                + Established cardiovascular disease or a very high risk of cardiovascular events (for example Framingham risk of cardiovascular disease greater than 20% over 10 years).
          o For people who do not have an AIDS diagnosis or co-infection with hepatitis B or C virus, and whose CD4 counts are greater than 500 cells/mm3, the guideline highlights that the benefits of starting antiretroviral treatment 'remain unclear'. It recommends considering enrolment into a 'when to start' trial where this is an option.

Basis for recommendation

These recommendations are based on guidelines issued by the British HIV Association (BHIVA) Treatment Guidelines Writing Group [British HIV Association, 2008b; Gazzard and BHIVA Treatment Guidelines Writing Group, 2008].
For primary HIV infection

    * Given the lack of evidence, the BHIVA criteria for initiating antiretroviral treatment is based on expert opinion, with the aims of:
          o Preserving specific anti-HIV immune responses (that would otherwise be lost) which are associated with long-term non-progression in untreated people.
          o Reducing morbidity due to high viraemia and CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion during acute infection.
          o Reducing the risk of onward HIV transmission.

For established HIV infection

    * The BHIVA Treatment Guideline Writing Group recommends that every effort should be made to start antiretroviral treatment before the CD4 count falls below 200 cells/mm3 because initiating treatment below this CD4 count is associated with a significantly greater risk of disease progression and death.
    * The BHIVA recommendation to start treatment in all people with a CD4 count less than 350 cells/mm3 is based on expert opinion and a consideration of available trial evidence.
    * The guideline recommends that antiretroviral treatment should be initiated in all people with CD4 count less than 350 cells/mm3. Although several studies suggested that 'CD4 percentage may have a small additional prognostic value independently of the total CD4 cell count' [Gazzard and BHIVA Treatment Guidelines Writing Group, 2008], the BHIVA Treatment Guideline Writing Group found the data conflicting. Some studies have indicated that CD4 percentages less than 15–17% were indicative of increased risk of disease progression.


What antiretroviral drugs are available in UK?

    * Seven classes of antiretroviral drugs are marketed in the UK (see Table 1). For further information on mechanism of action, see HIV replication, genetic variation, antiretrovirals.
    * To aid adherence, several combination products are available (see Table 1). These are commonly prescribed by their proprietary names.
    * All antiretroviral drugs are available as tablets or capsules, except for enfuvirtide, which is available as an injection.

Table 1. Antiretroviral drugs marketed in the UK.
Class and mechanism of action
Drug*
Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)

    * Interfere with the transcription of viral RNA into DNA.
    * Incorporated into newly synthesized viral DNA, and prevent further transcription.

Abacavir (1592, Ziagen®)
Didanosine (ddI, Videx®)
Emtricitabine (FTC, Emtriva®)
Lamivudine (3TC, Epivir®)
Stavudine (d4T, Zerit®)
Zidovudine (AZT)
Combined NRTI products:

    * Lamivudine + zidovudine (Combivir®)
    * Abacavir + lamivudine (Kivexa®)
    * Abacavir + lamivudine + zidovudine (Trizivir®)

Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NtRTI)

    * Mechanism of action identical to NRTIs.

Tenofovir (Viread®)
Combined NtRTI and NRTI products:

    * Emtricitabine + tenofovir (Truvada®)
    * Efavirenz + emtricitabine + tenofovir (Atripla®)

Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    * Interfere with the transcription of viral RNA into DNA.
    * Bind directly to the reverse transcriptase enzyme, and inhibit its function.

Efavirenz (Sustiva®)
Etravirine (Intelence®)
Nevirapine (Viramune®)
Protease inhibitors (PIs)

    * Interfere with the cleavage of large proteins into smaller proteins that are necessary for viral replication.

Atazanavir (Reyataz®)
Darunavir (Prezista®)
Fosamprenavir (Telzir®)
Indinavir (Crixivan®)
Lopinavir + ritonavir (Kaletra®)
Nelfinavir (Viracept®)†
Ritonavir (Norvir®)
Saquinavir (Invirase®)
Tipranavir (Aptivus®)
Fusion inhibitors

    * Interfere with binding, fusion and entry of HIV-1 to the host cell by blocking one of several targets.

Enfuvirtide (T-20, Fuzeon® — available only as an injection)
CCR5 inhibitors

    * Binds to CCR5 receptors, preventing the HIV virus from binding to these receptors. Consequently, this prevents CCR5-trophic HIV virus from engaging with a CD4 cell.

Maraviroc (Celsentri®)
Integrase inhibitors

    * Interfere with the integration of HIV-derived DNA into the host cell's DNA.

Raltegravir (Isentress®)
* Drug name (abbreviation and brand name).
† No longer used in the UK.

I will ask a practitioner here in the UK what the situation is for someone who has duel nationality but has been living out of the country for many years.

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2010, 08:17:37 AM »
OK I have some more information for you regarding access to HIV treatment when you return to the UK.

I have checked with one of the Senior Nurses at the Clinic I attend in Liverpool and he has informed me that there is no restriction regarding the access to treatment for anyone - whereever you go to.

I have also confirmed this with a HIV/AIDS charity in Liverpool and they said exactly the same thing.
I am sure that the THT will concur with this.

The only possible problem in the first period (which we believe is the first 6 months) would be if you are hospitalised, then you may be told you would have to pay for drugs or whatever.

I would recommend that you go to a Centre of Excellence for HIV treatment and not to a local GP.
If you could say whereabouts you are likely to move to in the country, you say with your mother but not where, then I may be able to suggest which hospital to attend.

What you will have to look into though, is your financial situation.  As you have been out of the country for 13 years, then you will not be entitled, at least for a while, to any state benefits.

Hope that that is of assistance and good luck.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:57:46 AM by TC »

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2010, 02:37:00 PM »
Thank you so much, TC :) My health is overall pretty good, touch wood, so I'm not concerned about being hospitalised...and if I were to be, that bridge can be crossed then. I wouldn't need state benefits right away, either, though I'd have taken them if I could have LOL I'm fit enough to work, and it would be good to get me out the house & meeting new people at a job.

My mum lives in Suffolk...a few miles outside of Ipswich

Offline newt

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2010, 03:22:11 PM »
Hello

UK citizens returning to live permanently in the UK after living abroad for more than three months are entitled to free NHS hospital treatment from the day they return.

Treatment eligibility is based on the common law concept of being "ordinarily resident", which is: (1) living here for 12 month's legally (anyone for any reason); (2) showing an intent to live here permanently "for the time being" and being entitled to live here. There is no 6 month wait for people who are ordinarily resident.

Unless you have a current British passport, it might be an idea to secure proof of your dual nationality before you return if you do not have it. It will cost you some money, maybe £50-100. You should apply in your current country of residence.

Personally, I'd want to go to a clinic which sees at least 250 patients, which kinda excludes all in Suffolk, but the east London hospitals, Royal London and Homerton have some star doctors and are not too long on the train and tube from Suffolk, even if they might be a bit down at heel. Homerton is getting a brand new HIV centre tho, with a garden no less.

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2010, 03:43:20 PM »
There you go, someone with a bit more info than I.
I would agree with travelling down to London  you would arrive at Liverpool Street Station.

To get to the Homerton take a tube to Stratford and then change and on to Homerton
you you could go straight from Ipswich to Stratford and then take the tube to Homerton

Otherwise if you went to the London Hospital you travel to Liverpool Street Station in London and then take a bus - would probably take longer but you get a day in London if you would like that every three months.

The Homerton has an excellent reputation.


Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2010, 03:47:32 PM »
Thanks Matt & TC!

 I've never had a UK passport, as it always made sense to have a US one for the visa thing. I do have my UK birth certificate somewhere, as well as the US birth-abroad certificate. I had a NI number as well, though I can't remember it, but I might have it somewhere.

I'd not thought about travelling to London...that's a good idea. Might be able to talk mum into driving if it's every three months, or at least for the first visit, then we could have a day in London together...she has a friend in Richmond, who she stays with, so that's another option.

ox

Dan

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2010, 02:10:27 AM »
Dan, Richmond is to the South East of London whereas the Homerton is in the East of London a distance by road of some 16 miles, going through the West End, it would take a good while by car due to London Traffic.

Remember London is about 20 miles across and the population is something in the region of 7.5 million.

I can assure you, you and your mum wouldn't want to shlep across London with all the commuters too often - it is exhausting - I used to live in London for 20 years.

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2010, 03:51:02 AM »
Hi Dan

I have been looking around and found that there is a Sexual Health Clinic in Ipswich - but I have no idea of how many patients they treat there and so the level of the experience that they have.

GUM - Ipswich Hospital
Department of Sexual Health
Heath Road
Ipswich
IP4 5PD

It may well be worth using the following link:
http://www.tht.org.uk/howwecanhelpyou/clinicfinder/?postcode=&region=Ipswich&Action.x=13&Action.y=10&Action=GetService&ServiceSearch=true 

Just a thought

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2010, 04:22:02 AM »
Thanks TC. I wouldn't expect mum to drive all over London...I'm big enough & ugly enough to manage the tube, the train form Ipswich as well, if needs be. Knowing mum, she might want to come and show support for my first visit up there.

When I call the Ipswich GUM, what sort of questions shouls I ask them?

Offline Cliff

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2010, 05:57:27 AM »
Yep, you will have immediate access if you prove you are a resident.  Though to be honest, I'm not sure they will ever care/ask.  They didn't me (though my GP did when I registered). 

You might want to ask how their clinic work (team of doctors, your own doctor, blood drawns, walk-in ability, access to oncall doctor).  But probably best to just find a good one near you and sign up. 

Bring your medical records (if possible) from Canada/US with you!  Particularly if you're on medication that you want to continue to take.

Offline leese43

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2010, 06:46:54 AM »
To throw something else into the mix, I had been thinking about changing to Chelsea & Westminster which is just a 20 min tube ride plus a bus for me. I was glad I hadn't while I was very sick over the last few weeks..there was no way I could have made that journey the 3 times that I had to go visit my doc. I understand some people have no choice because there are no services in their area but if you do have a GUM more local I would take this into account.
Oct 04 - Neg
Aug 05 - infected
Oct 05 - cd4 780, vl 60k
Apr 08 - cd4 430, vl 243
Jul 08 - cd4 550, vl 896
Nov 08 - cd4 730, vl 1.8k
May 09 - cd4 590, vl 1.5k
Sep 09 - cd4 460 vl 34k
Dec 09 - cd4 470 vl 42k
April 10 - cd4 430 vl 88.5k
July 10 - cd4 330 vl 118k
Aug 10 - started reyataz/truvada/norvir
Aug 10 - cd4 380 vl 4k (12 days after starting meds :))
Sep 10 - cd4 520 vl 1.5k
Oct 10 - cd4 590 vl 44
Jan 11 -cd4 610 vl <40 cd4% 50
May 11 - cd4 780 vl UD

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2010, 10:07:37 AM »
The thing about driving through London is that at times you will be lucky if you go at 10 mph.
It is not unlike Los Angeles for traffic, except that for London the roads are narrower and god help you if you are in the wrong lane.  It can be a nightmare for even those used to the layout of London - and remember we don't have grid systems as you do in much of the US.

If you are thinking of going to a local clinic, I would want to be sure that they had the experience and broad client base and that your Consultant or Registrar (I don't know what you would call them in the US - senior physicians) are dealing with HIV just about all the time.  They need to have the detailed knowledge for you to get the best care.  As someone has said something like 250 cases in the Clinic - Ipswich may struggle with that. See if THT have any info on this.

Here in the UK you can choose which hospital you go to.
You will very unlikley to be asked about your nationality for general treatment in the GUM clinic although you may when it comes to registering with a GP.

Yes take details of you case, and what drugs you are on etc.

I am sure it would be good for you to have your mum with you for moral support on your first visit.
All power to her that she is supportive.

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2010, 04:00:34 PM »
Thanks TC...I'm gonna call the Ipswich GUM clinic tonight (due to the 8 hour time difference) and see what their story is like. Good to know that I can go anywhere in the UK for treatment...here in the US, it feels so much more complicated...

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2010, 04:30:35 AM »
So I called the Ipswich GUM & spoke to a nurse who had a good vibe...she said they have a couple of consultants who specialise in HIV & she knew they have the drugs I'm taking...and she also knew what I'd need to bring into them when I first visit. So maybe the Ipswich GUM might be a good starting point & if it's not what I need when I get there, I can make a trip up to London. I'd want to take 2 or 3 months worth of medications with me to the UK, anyways, for peace of mind. But I'm feeling a little more confident now that it should be a relatively smooth transition. So thank you all for all your help :) Now I just need to figure out if I'm actually gonna move back or not LOL

Offline babydreams

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2010, 05:59:23 AM »
Defarge
Goodluck with the move.  Im currently having treatment in the countryside in the UK and must admit I wish I was at a bigger clinic. My husband and I have to travel to Chelsea and westminster hospital in London as it's the only hospital that does IVF as we are trying for  a baby.  The staff there are so friendly and have more experience that my countryside hospital.
goodluck

Offline TC

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2010, 02:20:42 AM »
Dan

Something that has occured to me - it may well be worth finding out, if which ever hospital you go to, should you decide to move to the UK, is a University Teaching Hospital.

I would strongly suggest that you only go to such a hospital, generally these are in major cities.

Tremaine

Offline lost_boy

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2010, 05:57:24 PM »
Just to reassure you a little... I live in Gloucestershire and my first thought when I was diagnosed (aside from the usual!) was "oh crap, I'm miles from anywhere". BUT I've been surprised by the (excellent!) care and attention I've got at the sexual health clinic attached to the local hospital. As the nurses and other staff often repeat, you'd be surprised at the numbers of people they treat, and the wide range. So they actually have more experience than you may think.

Anyway, the point is that I was pleasantly surprised and I hope it's not so bad for you either. The only pain is a half hour drive... but that's the same in some cities!

Offline Veritee

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2010, 11:13:41 AM »
Hi
I a female and live in a VERY rural area of the UK. I do have to travel 20 miles for treatment and bloods.

But the medical treatment for my HIV is good the meds ( Atripla in my case) are totally free to anyone who needs them and without even a prescription charge and are posted to me every three months free of charge, I can not fault their treatment and medical knowledge of HIV.
 
The same clinic saved my husbands life when he became ill and we did not know he - or I - had HIV and he had AIDs with CD4 of 8and  PCP etc and he clinic admitted him immediately - he and I are doing well.

UK is a good place to have HIV medically if you are going to get it.

The only problem I find is the lack of social support ( groups, peer support etc )  in the rural area I live for those with HIV especially heterosexual and female

All the best and good luck if you decide to move
Veritee
I have a blog here, please do not judge me on what I say here- I need to offload and this is where I do it: http://hiv-and-us.blogspot.com/

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2010, 08:08:28 PM »
Thought I should check in as I've finally made a decision and I will be moving back to the UK by the end of this year. I'm both excited and nervous, of course, as it's a huge change after 13 years of being in SF. I'm hoping to go back to school in the autumn of next year to study something fashion-related. My thanks to all of you who've helped with your advice and information.

Wanted to also share the good news about my numbers...after a month of being on Atripla and Viramune, my t-cells went from 248 to 517 and the viral load went from 333,000 to 656!

Offline newt

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2010, 04:35:33 AM »
Good  :)

But...why are you on Atripla and Viramune? I think this is one of the first things the docs in the UK will want to sort out. Pairing Atripla and Viramune is unusual even if it is (possibly but probably not) necessary.

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline Zohar

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2010, 09:28:58 AM »
Good  :)

But...why are you on Atripla and Viramune? I think this is one of the first things the docs in the UK will want to sort out. Pairing Atripla and Viramune is unusual even if it is (possibly but probably not) necessary.

- matt


Exactly what I was thinking. The whole point of Atripla is that it reduces the pill burden to one tablet a day, so I'm curious why an extra one has been added to your regime.
''Poor is the man whose pleasures depend on the permission of another.''

Offline Defarge

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2010, 11:10:04 AM »
Sorry, I wasn't paying attention...I'm on Truvada & Viramune.

Offline newt

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2010, 02:47:53 PM »
Ok

kosher  :)

good luck with the move.

- matt
"The object is to be a well patient, not a good patient"

Offline Inchlingblue

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #30 on: September 04, 2010, 04:18:13 PM »
You're very lucky that you are able to go live in a country that offers universal health care. There are currently more than 2,700 people (and counting) on ADAP waiting lists in the US.

You mention going back to school in the autumn. I'm stuck in a job I don't like because it offers good health care coverage. God forbid I should decide to go back to school or even risk changing jobs. Many people with HIV in the US have it even worse and don't have health coverage or ADAP, zilch, nada. A blogger on thebody.com (Thomas DeLorenzo) recently wrote about not being able to attend law school because it would mean giving up his current health coverage and not being able to get another.

If it were me, this decision would be an easy one to make. Go to the UK and count your blessings.

LINK:

http://www.thebody.com/content/art57953.html
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 04:32:22 PM by Inchlingblue »

Offline Ann

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Re: Thinking about moving back to the UK
« Reply #31 on: September 04, 2010, 04:53:02 PM »
Go to the UK and count your blessings.

Absolutely. I was born an American and struggled under the health system there until I was 29. I've been in the UK (actually not, I'm in the Isle of Man) since 1991 and since I ended up poz in 1997, I've counted my blessings nearly every day, especially when I read of the struggles of my poz comrades in the State.

I also was coinfected with hep C (got that in 1984) and the year I was treated (2002/03) would have been one expensive year, even by hiv standards, if I had still lived in the States during my treatment.

Thank goodness for the NHS. It may not be perfect, but it's one helluva lot better than what passes for the alleged best health care system in the world. USA healthcare = fail. Big time.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 04:54:38 PM by Ann »
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"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

 


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