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Author Topic: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure  (Read 6169 times)

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Offline ANGEL265

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U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« on: August 21, 2010, 09:23:21 AM »
Hi All,

Just saw this news item.Researchers at university of Minnesota have identified two drugs approved by FDA which are corrently used in pre cancer and cancer therapy.The drugs are Decitbaine and Gemcitabine used for this purpose of hiv treatment caused infection to mutate  and die without causing toxic side effects.
I thought to share this news which I found on KSPT.COM.

Angel

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2010, 10:11:45 AM »
Do you have a link to the actual story?

Offline J220

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2010, 10:24:42 AM »
Found one, just the abstract of the study: http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/84/18/9301

Exploiting Drug Repositioning for Discovery of a Novel HIV Combination Therapy.

Christine L. Clouser,1,2 Steven E. Patterson,3 and Louis M. Mansky, Institute for Molecular Virology, Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry,Center for Drug Design, Department of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

"In this study, we used drug repositioning, a process whereby a drug approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition, to identify clinically approved drugs that have anti-HIV activity. The data presented here show that a combination of two clinically approved drugs, decitabine and gemcitabine, reduced HIV infectivity by 73% at concentrations that had minimal antiviral activity when used individually.

Decreased infectivity coincided with a significant increase in mutation frequency and a shift in the HIV mutation spectrum. These results indicate that an increased mutational load is the primary antiviral mechanism for inhibiting the generation of infectious progeny virus from provirus. Similar results were seen when decitabine was used in combination with another ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor.

Our results suggest that HIV infectivity can be decreased by combining a nucleoside analog that forms noncanonical base pairs with certain ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. Such drug combinations are relevant since members of these drug classes are used clinically. Our observations support a model in which increased mutation frequency decreases infectivity through lethal mutagenesis."


"Hope is my philosophy
Just needs days in which to be
Love of Life means hope for me
Born on a New Day" - John David

Offline J220

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2010, 10:27:31 AM »
Another one: http://www.ahc.umn.edu/media/releases/HIVDrugs/


Researchers at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center have identified two drugs that, when combined, may serve as an effective treatment for HIV.

The two drugs, decitabine and gemcitabine – both FDA approved and currently used in pre-cancer and cancer therapy – were found to eliminate HIV infection in the mouse model by causing the virus to mutate itself to death – an outcome researchers dubbed “lethal mutagenesis.”

This is a landmark finding in HIV research because it is the first time this novel approach has been used to attack the deadly virus without causing toxic side effects. Because decitabine and gemcitabine are already FDA approved, researchers believe that if their research is effective in large animal models, it will be much easier to expedite the development of the drugs for human use.

The study is a collaboration between molecular virologists Louis Mansky, Ph.D., and Christine Clouser, Ph.D., of the Institute for Molecular Virology and School of Dentistry, as well as medicinal chemist Steven Patterson, Ph.D., from the Center for Drug Design. The findings were recently published online in the Journal of Virology.

“The findings provide hope that such an approach will someday help the 33 million people worldwide who currently live with HIV,” Mansky said.

Lethal mutagenesis
HIV mutates and evolves quickly. Rather than inhibiting virus growth and replication like current HIV drugs, this new drug combination forces the virus to do just the opposite – evolve beyond control, to the point of extinction.

“HIV’s ability to mutate makes it difficult to target and treat,” Mansky said. “We wanted to take advantage of this behavior by stimulating HIV’s mutation rate, essentially using the virus as a weapon against itself.”

One way to decrease cost and expedite the development of novel drugs is by the use of drug repositioning, the process of taking a drug that is used to treat one medical condition, and using it to treat a different illness.

By examining drugs that are already approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the researchers hope to expedite the development of this drug combination because the safety profiles of the two drugs are known.

U of M researchers found that the drug concentrations needed to eliminate HIV infection cause no measureable cell toxicity and were effective against HIV cultures at concentrations well below the current levels used for cancer treatment.

Gemcitabine and decitabine have been administered in pre-clinical trials with mice. Initial findings confirm that the drugs are an effective antiviral therapy for HIV.

The researchers are now in the process of modifying the drugs to forms that can be absorbed by the human body when taken orally.

The study was funded by the Center for Drug Design, Academic Health Center and the National Institutes of Health.
"Hope is my philosophy
Just needs days in which to be
Love of Life means hope for me
Born on a New Day" - John David

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2010, 03:44:36 PM »
U of M researchers found that the drug concentrations needed to eliminate HIV infection cause no measureable cell toxicity and were effective against HIV cultures at concentrations well below the current levels used for cancer treatment.

Extremely exciting stuff. I imagine, though, that the real challenge will come back to the reservoirs that can continue to produce virus. Perhaps these drugs will prove to be less toxic, less expensive replacements for current HAART, though.

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2010, 04:22:12 PM »
Call me thick, but I don't see "cure" anywhere in the articles, or the concept.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2010, 04:50:09 PM »
The two drugs, decitabine and gemcitabine – both FDA approved and currently used in pre-cancer and cancer therapy – were found to eliminate HIV infection in the mouse model by causing the virus to mutate itself to death – an outcome researchers dubbed “lethal mutagenesis.”

Offline leatherman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2010, 05:03:23 PM »
Call me thick, but I don't see "cure" anywhere in the articles, or the concept.
unless this destroys all the pockets of inactive HIV, it seems it's another treatment rather than a cure.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center have identified two drugs that, when combined, may serve as an effective treatment for HIV.
the actual summary from the Academic Health Center at University of Minnesota states "treatment" not "cure" - as "cure" is yet to be proven, though "treatment" looks like a possiblity

perhaps the error lies in english not being the OP's native language, or a lack of understanding in the difference of the two words. However, it does seem by reviewing the linked articles that this can not yet be titled a "cure" for HIV
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Oh my friends, my friends forgive me
That I live and you are gone.
There's a grief that can't be spoken.
There's a pain goes on and on.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables" from Les Miserables

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2010, 05:17:32 PM »
unless this destroys all the pockets of inactive HIV, it seems it's another treatment rather than a cure.

I agree Leatherman. However, in looking at some of the potential side effects of these drugs, I wonder if anyone would be interested in taking these drugs....

http://www.drugs.com/sfx/decitabine-side-effects.html

http://www.drugs.com/sfx/gemcitabine-side-effects.html


Offline leatherman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2010, 05:48:50 PM »
However, in looking at some of the potential side effects of these drugs, I wonder if anyone would be interested in taking these drugs...
well the report does say that they will be looking at a different (lessened) dosage than used for cancer patients
U of M researchers found that the drug concentrations needed to eliminate HIV infection cause no measureable cell toxicity and were effective against HIV cultures at concentrations well below the current levels used for cancer treatment

this won't be the first time an "anti-cancer" drug has been looked at to be used against HIV either. I don't have the fondest memories of the over-dosing of AZT monotherapy that was the first treatment used againtst HIV. The "stigma" against hiv meds persists till today due to azt usage and it's side effects.

(i'm a firm believer that that the lasting image of azt-induced anemia and puking is what people think will happen and why so many people today cry and whine when it's time for them to start meds. thankfully that isn't the reality of today but is like so 90s :D )

however, thinking about the side effects, that is what could be the downfall of this research. Sure these meds might work but if the side effects are more extreme than Atripla or Truvada etc, then this may never pan out as a treatment much less a cure.

after my own experience with AZT along with seeing cancer med side effects in several friends, family, my late partner (2 rounds of chemo wiped out his blood, made his hair fall out, and weakened him near to death, and still the tumors grew), and all those people in the oncology ward for 60 while my partner was in the hospital, i have to say that, for myself, cancer meds (and their side effects) aren't high on my list of things to take against HIV. They would really have to prove this to be a cure, or damned near it, to make me switch off my current regimen. ;)
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Oh my friends, my friends forgive me
That I live and you are gone.
There's a grief that can't be spoken.
There's a pain goes on and on.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables" from Les Miserables

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2010, 06:10:09 PM »
Won't it be great if the cocktail that wakes the reservoirs to be killed by HAART, turns out to be something everyday - aspirin + pecans + baking soda + licorice + cranberry juice.
I'm ok with looking at existing drugs but as with Leatherman, something is kind of worrisome about a cancer drug cocktail.
I guess there are many success stories about repurposed chemicals. But there are probably just as many greedy disaster stories.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2010, 06:15:00 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Hellraiser

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2010, 06:27:31 PM »
I think you guys are being a little bit thick, but maybe I'm misreading and misunderstanding.

Lethal mutagenesis is mutating the virus to the point that it offs itself.  Meaning that all the reservoirs will also be mutated to this point, correct?  I mean if HIV mutation wasn't retroactive back to the reservoirs then shouldn't mutations fall by the wayside once you've been on an effective HAART treatment for a while?

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2010, 06:46:01 PM »
Seems like it could only operate on actively replicating cells.  Whats the mechanism it would use to wake up HIV dna in resting cells.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Hellraiser

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2010, 06:48:09 PM »
Seems like it could only operate on actively replicating cells.  Whats the mechanism it would use to wake up HIV dna in resting cells.

If this were the case you would only ever KEEP resistances that your initial infection had to begin with as the reservoirs would be "locked and loaded" upon infection, no?

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2010, 06:50:45 PM »
You build resistances over the time you are actively replicating.  I think there is proof that there is no resistance acquired during successful HAART suppression to undetectable.  Not?
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline xman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #15 on: August 21, 2010, 06:55:37 PM »
My understanding is that only the strongest strain survives and replaces previous one. It's the way of natural selection. If the virus mutates too much and to levels on which it is unable to replicate anymore the viral population dies out. This in theory.
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline Hellraiser

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #16 on: August 21, 2010, 06:56:21 PM »
You build resistances over the time you are actively replicating.  I think there is proof that there is no resistance acquired during successful HAART suppression to undetectable.  Not?

You're missing the point.  You get infected with no resistances, you start meds and then stop being adherent, you develop resistance to let's say...Sustiva.  According to your postulation the reservoirs would not retroactively develop this resistance ONLY the active virus, so your infection comes back.  Then you take something else and suppress your viral load once more.  At this point all you have left are reservoirs which should mean that the reservoirs have 0 resistance right?

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2010, 07:19:58 PM »
Won't it be great if the cocktail that wakes the reservoirs to be killed by HAART, turns out to be something everyday - aspirin + pecans + baking soda + licorice + cranberry juice.

I'd be elated if it turned out to be Sapphire and a twist of lime, Mecch  ::)

Offline Hellraiser

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2010, 07:20:36 PM »
I'd be elated if it turned out to be Sapphire and a twist of lime, Mecch  ::)

If it were alcohol of any sort I would already be cured.

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2010, 07:34:00 PM »
You're missing the point.  You get infected with no resistances, you start meds and then stop being adherent, you develop resistance to let's say...Sustiva.  According to your postulation the reservoirs would not retroactively develop this resistance ONLY the active virus, so your infection comes back.  Then you take something else and suppress your viral load once more.  At this point all you have left are reservoirs which should mean that the reservoirs have 0 resistance right?

While you are replicating Sustiva resistant HIV - your reservoir also takes this new DNA into NEW sleeper cells. Say its only 3 months. Maybe its a long time that you are not undectable.  Still, during that time you are adding to the reservoir. Cells that sleep through the reactivation are obviously infected by the older, resistant- free HIV you used to have.

But I dunno. I'm not up on this science.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline leatherman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2010, 07:49:22 PM »
turns out to be something everyday - aspirin + pecans + baking soda + licorice + cranberry juice.
I always thought my Granny's Southern pecan pie was good enough to be the cure for something. LOL

At this point all you have left are reservoirs which should mean that the reservoirs have 0 resistance right?
some virus mutations hurt hiv and make it unable to reproduce. other mutations make hiv a heartier virus.

unsuppressed, the virus courses throughout a body. once it is suppressed (through meds which interfere in it's reproduction cycle) the remaining low level virus (with whatever mutations it has acquired) ends up in reservoirs.

So during your example of initial infection, suppression, non-adherence, regrowth, and suppression again, the virus in the reservoirs will have the chance to expand during the non-adherence stage, develop mutations, and then get suppressed into reservoirs again - with it's new mutations.

it's often tricky to get the right "salvage therapy" once someone has developed multiple resistance issues (often due to various periods of non-adherence) due to some mutations lingering and some not. For example, my virus still retains it's sustiva resistance (as that mutation makes HIV heartier) yet recently we proved through a med change that the epivir mutation (which damages the hiv making it less viable) is no longer present. so clearly my reservoirs of HIV have been stirred up through the years. the only way to accurately tell what mutations it still holds would be for me to stop meds and allow the viral load to rise enough to get an accurate amount to test. (of course, that is not a plan I care to implement ;) )
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Oh my friends, my friends forgive me
That I live and you are gone.
There's a grief that can't be spoken.
There's a pain goes on and on.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables" from Les Miserables

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2010, 07:56:57 PM »
...yet recently we proved through a med change that the epivir mutation (which damages the hiv making it less viable) is no longer present. so clearly my reservoirs of HIV have been stirred up through the years. the only way to accurately tell what mutations it still holds would be for me to stop meds and allow the viral load to rise enough to get an accurate amount to test. (of course, that is not a plan I care to implement ;) )

that's extremely interesting, Leatherman. Has that been reported to researchers?  It sounds like, based on your experience, it is possible to deplete the reservoirs of a strain of the virus, right?

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2010, 08:19:47 PM »
I understood this:  an active HIV infection that is resistant can possibly mutate into a wild unresitant infection.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline leatherman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #23 on: August 21, 2010, 08:27:48 PM »
Has that been reported to researchers?  It sounds like, based on your experience, it is possible to deplete the reservoirs of a strain of the virus, right?
recently my doc wanted to change out the videx ec in my regimen to truvada. emtriva is a component of truvada. the epivir and emtriva mutations are very similar so that developing resistance to one med usually rules out the other one being effective. I did not want to change meds knowing I had the epivir mutation.

However, my doc pointed me to research that shows that the epivir/emtriva mutations are "bad" mutations. These mutations actually corrupt the HIV making it produce "defective" HIV. Sadly, of course the defective HIV still co-opts my immune system as it reproduces it's damaged children. this means that there are some mutations (causing resistance to certain drugs) that can actually disappear after a certain amount of time.

time, successful suppression of HIV, and basic evolution are key to these bad mutations dying off. Of course, research on the exact passage of time and length of suppression are hard to obtain as it would mean having to let the viral load rise to have the quantity needed to test for the variables.  Not only would that entail allowing a patience to possibly get ill with the higher viral load destroying his immune system; but new mutations could also occur.

thankfully, my switch to truvada worked out and instead of a rising VL and lower cd4, my VL has stayed stable at undetectable (well, 50, which goes to show that UD is not "no hiv", it's just that there's too little to properly count) and my cd4s hit an all time (out of 20 yrs) high of 318
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Oh my friends, my friends forgive me
That I live and you are gone.
There's a grief that can't be spoken.
There's a pain goes on and on.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables" from Les Miserables

Offline leatherman

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #24 on: August 21, 2010, 08:38:49 PM »
can possibly mutate into a wild unresitant infection.
yeppers

because mutations can be so variable, each time a patient has a period of non-compliance and a viral load that rises, a new genotype must be done before restarting meds to determine the current mutation pattern so the correct meds are prescribed.

I've had genotype and phenotype testing done several times because of my non-compliance/resistance issues. (I don't recommend people go off their meds; but if you, like me in the 90s, find yourself throwing up multiple times a day every day of your life, I can sympathize if you choose to make a quality of life decision and go off meds) These incidences have led to me taking over 15 different HIV meds through the years as my doctors have had to try various combinations to create my "salvage therapy". Thankfully, meds have improved over 20 yrs and I'm now actually on a fairly standard regimen of reyetaz/norvir/truvada.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Oh my friends, my friends forgive me
That I live and you are gone.
There's a grief that can't be spoken.
There's a pain goes on and on.
Empty chairs at empty tables
Where my friends will meet no more.

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables" from Les Miserables

Offline sam66

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #25 on: August 21, 2010, 09:05:58 PM »


    I always wondered if you could make the virus mutate itself to death

    exciting news
december 2007 diagnosed +ve ,

Offline MitchMiller

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2010, 11:05:18 PM »
From a practical standpoint, IF mutagenesis works, this is a promising technique that doesn't rely on modifying the immune system.  It sounds safer, cheaper, and likely to be more rapidly approved by FDA.

I hope some $$$ flow in this direction.  After the debacle of KP1531 (or whatever it was called), I was afraid this technique would be put aside.  Sounds like this could generate new interest in mutageneis.

Offline ANGEL265

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2010, 11:18:19 PM »

Actually the news was written with the same heading " U of M Researchers may have hiv cure". The description did not have word cure. But I think there is difference in" may have and have " in my opinion.

Offline datdude

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2010, 11:24:13 PM »
This is what KP-1461 is supposed to do people, KP was supossed to make the virus mutate itself to death, I'm from Minnesota so this is pretty cool to hear. Lets Hope and pray this one works.                            http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-08/uom-uom082010.php

Offline WillyWump

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2010, 11:51:46 PM »
These drugs sound like a living hell, something akin to AZT perhaps. I undertand that they are saying they can achieve Mutagenisis at a lower doage than currently prescribed, but even at the lower doses what side effects will remain?

Side effects of Decitabine_(from ElZorros Link)

Neutropenia-abnormally low white blood cells 90%
Thrombocytopenia - low blood platelets 89%
Anmeia - 82%
Pyrexia (fever)- 53%
Peripheral edema- 25%
NAusea- 42%
Constipation- 35%
Diarreha- 34%
Vomitting- 25%
Cough- 40%
Pallor- 23%

These are only the higher percentage of side effects, there are about 20-30 other smaller percentage side effects. And of course, this doesnt even take into account the similiar side effects from the second drug Gemcitabine.

Of course IF these drugs show that it can cure HIV (and that is a HUGE "If") I dont think any of us would mind these side effects. However if it just pans out as another treatment option It obviously would have problems due to the possible side effects, which I will admit remain to be seen at lower doses.

But to the question of the resorvoirs....If these drugs do in fact mutate the free floating virus to death, wouldnt that prompt the resorvoirs to activate in order to re-populate the free floating virus? and in doing so wouldnt it eventually  deplete the resorvoirs over time? (Preferably a short time)

-W



« Last Edit: August 21, 2010, 11:54:10 PM by WillyWump »
POZ since '08

Last Labs-
6/25/13 CD4- 1036, UD,
2/4/13, CD4 - 489, UD, 28%
8/9/12, CD4 not taken, UD.
2/13/12, CD4- 904, UD 42%

Current Meds: Prezista/Epzicom/ Norvir
.

Offline mecch

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2010, 12:03:29 AM »
But to the question of the resorvoirs....If these drugs do in fact mutate the free floating virus to death, wouldnt that prompt the resorvoirs to activate in order to re-populate the free floating virus? and in doing so wouldnt it eventually  deplete the resorvoirs over time? (Preferably a short time)
-W

My doc told me that effectively, when undetectable, there is no such thing as "free floating virus".  Any virus measured is deactivated immediately by the HAART in the blood.

Isn't the key what makes a sleeping cell awake? It may not be lack of virus in the blood.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline WillyWump

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2010, 12:13:54 AM »

 It may not be lack of virus in the blood.


Alas, I think your correct. I forget what causes the turnover of the resorvoirs (if it's in fact known), but I remember reading somewhere that under HAART treatment the resorvoirs would turnover and deplete themselves in 60 years.

Thus it would seem we know that currently the resorvoirs are turning over and depletingat a very slow rate, but its possible that we dont know "why" they turnover and deplete.

-W
POZ since '08

Last Labs-
6/25/13 CD4- 1036, UD,
2/4/13, CD4 - 489, UD, 28%
8/9/12, CD4 not taken, UD.
2/13/12, CD4- 904, UD 42%

Current Meds: Prezista/Epzicom/ Norvir
.

Offline ElZorro

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Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2010, 12:15:31 AM »
I'm thinking the focus has to be on figuring out how to activate the latent virus in the reservoirs so that HAART can destroy it. Based on what I've read and on some of what Leatherman seems to have experienced, there is a finite amount of this latent virus so it could, theoretically be completely eradicated. The challenge will be in activating it so that HAART can destroy it.

I just go over a cold sore last week. I haven't had one in a couple of years, but after spending a week out in the sun, I guess it was inevitable.  I should have remembered that I have that virus in my body and should have taken some Valtrex to try to prevent an onset. But, I didn't. Que Sera...(I got my first cold sore about 5 years ago on a cruise and have had a total of 3 in my life). 

The reason I bring that up is that I'm wondering if we will ever really know whether the dormant HIV is gone and be able to cease HAART.  In the case of a cold sore (a herpes virus), there are physical symptoms that alert one to the outbreak and the appropriate meds can be started immediately. With HIV, we would only know by continuing regular labs, right?  I would think that failure to realize that HIV had returned and was circulating might end up creating more serious situations than just staying on HAART for life.

Offline mecch

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  • red pill? or blue pill?
Re: U of M Researchers may have hiv cure
« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2010, 12:31:04 AM »
With HIV, we would only know by continuing regular labs, right?  I would think that failure to realize that HIV had returned and was circulating might end up creating more serious situations than just staying on HAART for life.

I would assume the proof of a cure would be tested over many years. Interim, there would be no reason why supposedly cured people didn't continue to get labs to make sure there was no restart of the virus.

Why would people, therefore, fail to realize a resurgent HIV infection.  The other challenge would be to stick to safe sex on the possibility that there was virus appearing before a regular lab check caught it.  

All to say, if there was good proof that the proposed cure works and is safe enough, i would take it rather than stay on HAART forever. If the cured failed after a few years, i could just go back on HAART. 
« Last Edit: August 22, 2010, 12:32:59 AM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

 


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