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Author Topic: Is this good parenting?  (Read 3676 times)

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Offline mecch

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Is this good parenting?
« on: June 12, 2010, 07:18:34 AM »
American boy Jordan Romero, 13, conquers Mount Everest; youngest ever to reach summit
Saturday, May 22nd 2010, 10:08 AM
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/2010/05/22/2010-05-22_13yearold_american_conquers_mount_everest_youngest_ever_to_reach_summit_.html



__________________________________________________





Parents Say Teenage Sailor Rescued
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2010/06/12/us/AP-Lost-Sailor-Found.html?_r=1&hp
Laurence Sunderland, the father of 16-year-old Abby Sunderland, told reporters outside his home that maritime authorities had contacted him to confirm the rescue.



“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Online RapidRod

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2010, 07:45:13 AM »
I didn't find anything wrong with it. The boy was a avid climber and the girl was a avid boater. To bad the girl couldn't complete her trip.

Offline J.R.E.

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2010, 07:46:11 AM »


About as good parenting , as this one : If your too young to drive a car, why in the hell are you piloting a Plane.  All for the parents ego...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/girl-pilot-aged-7-killed-crossing-america-1304367.html


Ray
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Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2010, 07:50:36 AM »
I didn't find anything wrong with it. The boy was a avid climber and the girl was a avid boater. To bad the girl couldn't complete her trip.

Yeah I am of mixed mind. I agree these are very special, driven, disciplined kids.
But still, climbing everest is very dangerous. Sailing an ocean alone is very dangerous.
How could a parent accept such risks for someone below the age of really understanding risk. Or do these kids understand, completely?  Isn't it actionable if something goes wrong, for instance.  Could child welfare advocates sue these parents?
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline bocker3

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2010, 10:15:18 AM »
Yeah I am of mixed mind. I agree these are very special, driven, disciplined kids.
But still, climbing everest is very dangerous. Sailing an ocean alone is very dangerous.
How could a parent accept such risks for someone below the age of really understanding risk. Or do these kids understand, completely?  Isn't it actionable if something goes wrong, for instance.  Could child welfare advocates sue these parents?

Oh come on -- it's dangerous crossing the street -- how many kids die from falling off playground equipement -- should those parents be sued also??  Of course, I don't know that anyone would have grounds for suit anyway -- people are much to quick to consider lawsuits.

It's none of my business at at the end of the day.

Mike
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Offline leatherman

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2010, 10:25:43 AM »
it's dangerous crossing the street -- how many kids die from falling off playground equipement --
however, the risk rate of crossing the street or playing on playgrounds isn't quite in the same category as the risk rate of allowing your minor child to be alone for weeks on the ocean in a tiny boat. that seems like an apples-n-oranges comparison as not all risks are equal.
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Offline next2u

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2010, 10:52:43 AM »
i dont know if it is good parenting but i've seen a lot of lousy parenting in my local neighborhood. parents who have kids who are avid anything and encourage them to follow their dreams seem to be better parents to me.

these are rare cases that border on the extraordinary. i wish my parents would have encouraged me to play a musical instrument or to complete the study abroad program when i was in middle school instead of running around with friends i don't talk to anymore.

is this good parenting? the kids are bright and accomplished. they do things that others only dream of doing. i'm leaning more towards yes, this is good parenting. what's the point of living if one does not follow their dreams?

best,
d
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Offline bocker3

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2010, 11:36:56 AM »
however, the risk rate of crossing the street or playing on playgrounds isn't quite in the same category as the risk rate of allowing your minor child to be alone for weeks on the ocean in a tiny boat. that seems like an apples-n-oranges comparison as not all risks are equal.

You really do love to nitpick and argue, don't you..... 

I've not heard of a single child dying on Evererst or in a boat alone (not saying it hasn't happened, just that I've not heard of it), but have heard of countless die from being hit by a car -- so while the risks may not be equal, the likelihood of dying from one or the other is highest in what you consider "lower" is much, much higher.  Obviously, your average child won't be engaging in one of these activities being highlighted here -- these are exceptional kids, who clearly know what they are doing.  I mean the mountain climber made it to the top and back -- the sailor made it 1/2 way around the globe -- probably farther than many adults who have tried. 

Would I encourage my own kids or grandkids to do these things -- probably not, but I'd like to think that if they had the aptitude and the maturity that i wouldn't step on their dreams.  The parents should make sure that these kids have more than the technical ability -- I would guess that these kids are a bit more mature than the average kid their age -- of course I have no way to ascertain this information.  That is why I say it's none of my business.  One can not and should not judge parenting off of news reports -- parenting is not easy nor is it a "cookie cutter" activity.  Each child is unique and the parenting needed should be tailored to that child.

Mike
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Offline Hellraiser

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2010, 11:42:46 AM »
You really do love to nitpick and argue, don't you..... 

I've not heard of a single child dying on Evererst or in a boat alone (not saying it hasn't happened, just that I've not heard of it), but have heard of countless die from being hit by a car -- so while the risks may not be equal, the likelihood of dying from one or the other is highest in what you consider "lower" is much, much higher.  Obviously, your average child won't be engaging in one of these activities being highlighted here -- these are exceptional kids, who clearly know what they are doing.  I mean the mountain climber made it to the top and back -- the sailor made it 1/2 way around the globe -- probably farther than many adults who have tried. 

Would I encourage my own kids or grandkids to do these things -- probably not, but I'd like to think that if they had the aptitude and the maturity that i wouldn't step on their dreams.  The parents should make sure that these kids have more than the technical ability -- I would guess that these kids are a bit more mature than the average kid their age -- of course I have no way to ascertain this information.  That is why I say it's none of my business.  One can not and should not judge parenting off of news reports -- parenting is not easy nor is it a "cookie cutter" activity.  Each child is unique and the parenting needed should be tailored to that child.

Mike

He was actually just pointing out the flaw in your logic.  One kid climbs mount everest and doesn't die, 100% survival rate.  5million kids play in the street and 1 gets killed...less than 100% survival rate.  Doesn't mean the first activity is safer, just that there were less chances of risk.

Offline bocker3

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2010, 11:51:28 AM »
He was actually just pointing out the flaw in your logic.  One kid climbs mount everest and doesn't die, 100% survival rate.  5million kids play in the street and 1 gets killed...less than 100% survival rate.  Doesn't mean the first activity is safer, just that there were less chances of risk.

There was no flaw in my logic -- I NEVER EQUATED the risks -- i simply pointed out that kids are at risk in a myriad of situations and that this isn't grounds for legal action as was questioned by the post I quoted.  This does not point to bad parenting.  Letting a child climb a mountain that didn't have the right ability and maturity would be similar to letting a young child play on the side of a busy street without supervision -- they both greatly increase the likelihood of a bad outcome.  Letting a child who has the ability and maturity to climb a mountain is similar to letting an older (more mature) child play outside near a busy street -- because the outcome is far less likely to be bad.

No on on this forum has the ability to fully judge wether these kids had both the ability and maturity to do what they did, hence my stance that it is none of our business.  Judging someone else's parenting with limited knowledge is a waste of time.

Mike
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Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2010, 11:59:41 AM »
Oh come on -- it's dangerous crossing the street -- how many kids die from falling off playground equipement -- should those parents be sued also??  Of course, I don't know that anyone would have grounds for suit anyway -- people are much to quick to consider lawsuits.

It's none of my business at at the end of the day.

Mike

  I agree.  I don't think it's bad parenting at all.  Children take part in organized sports all the time that put them at risk.  Every year kids die on the baseball diamond after taking a ball to the head or chest, and I am sure people can see the risk football brings, it's pretty explicit.  This year alone the sport of motocross has lost 5 children all under the age of 13.  Hell just dropping your kid off at school is a risk these days.  

  

  

  

  
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2010, 12:07:30 PM »
There was no flaw in my logic -- I NEVER EQUATED the risks -- i simply pointed out that kids are at risk in a myriad of situations and that this isn't grounds for legal action as was questioned by the post I quoted.  This does not point to bad parenting.  Letting a child climb a mountain that didn't have the right ability and maturity would be similar to letting a young child play on the side of a busy street without supervision -- they both greatly increase the likelihood of a bad outcome.  Letting a child who has the ability and maturity to climb a mountain is similar to letting an older (more mature) child play outside near a busy street -- because the outcome is far less likely to be bad.

No on on this forum has the ability to fully judge wether these kids had both the ability and maturity to do what they did, hence my stance that it is none of our business.  Judging someone else's parenting with limited knowledge is a waste of time.

Mike

   Yeah exactly.  It's not like the girl sailing around the world received a revelation one day while riding her tricycle and told her landlubber daddy that she wanted to rule the oceans.  My guess is she obtained this love through possibly her father (who knows) and he probably gained confidence in her abilities through the years.  The same thing for the hill climbing kid, quite certain he saw a mountain before.

    What we should be worried about is if the parents talked to them about protecting themselves when they have sex for the first time.
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2010, 12:14:42 PM »
Its a given we don't know the details of many news items we discuss.  We can still discuss.  Voicing the opinion that we shouldn't discuss such things adds to the discussion.

The football comparison is MUCH better than playgrounds and crossing the street.  And many people discuss the football risk and its hardly a settled question in parenting.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline bear60

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2010, 12:46:03 PM »
Who paid for all that gear and stuff?
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Offline leatherman

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2010, 12:48:11 PM »
There was no flaw in my logic -- I NEVER EQUATED the risks -- i simply pointed out that kids are at risk in a myriad of situations and that this isn't grounds for legal action as was questioned by the post I quoted.
but I didn't quote the part about legal action and never mentioned it either. Since NO ONE is filing suit in this case, that was just an offhand comment made by someone else and just a tangent to the actually topic.

But of course you were comparing the risks, otherwise why mention them  (playgrounds or crossing the street) at all? Doh!  ::) You were most assuredly trying to make a point about the risk evaluation by comparing these different activities. I simply made a comment that those were obviously highly different activities and the related risks were drastically different. Comparing the risks of a more dangerous sport, like skeebo did, was more appropriate than then much more beign childhood activity of playing in the playground.

to me it seemed like the wrong-headed analogy that I hear about dying from AIDS vs. getting hit by the mythical bus. The odds are stacked against me for my dying by AIDS (or even by a lightning strike) before any stupid bus comes along. The minor child alone in the boat is putting her life in much greater risk than any child crossing the street, not because of the amount of children that have been hurt in the roads but because the risks in the ocean are greater.

I'm sorry you chose to see my part in this discussion as argumentative and nit-picking. I thought it was a discussion; but since you have already pontificated your perfect judgement of the correct ending of this discussion, I'll leave you to it. Next time I notice you take part in a discussion I'll remember that you would rather not have anyone (namely me, I guess) reply to your comments since your opinion in the matter is the end of the discussion

sheesh.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


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Offline Queen Tokelove

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2010, 01:02:04 PM »
Who paid for all that gear and stuff?

My thoughts exactly. The average kid or parents doesn't have the money to do those things in the first place. It's quite an accomplishment on both of the kids parts, I'll give them props for that but there should have been better adult supervision for the girl traveling the world in her boat.
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Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2010, 01:03:31 PM »
Its a given we don't know the details of many news items we discuss.  We can still discuss.  Voicing the opinion that we shouldn't discuss such things adds to the discussion.

The football comparison is MUCH better than playgrounds and crossing the street.  And many people discuss the football risk and its hardly a settled question in parenting.

Oh no, I'm  just giving my opinion is all.  I think it's a great topic for discussion.  If you asked me if I would let my kid sail around the world, the answer would most likely be no and mainly so because of my own fear of the ocean.

Just keep in mind mecch your topic heading ask if it's bad parenting.  Any reasonable person who looks at it objectively rather than emotionally will most likely notice that all these kids look pretty darn healthy and well adjusted.  Looks like their parents did a damn fine job if you ask me.
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2010, 02:54:04 PM »
Seems to me that girl narrowly missed death. So she was healthy and fabulous before she hit the Indian Ocean and is healthy and fabulous now.  But almost died.  

As I said I have mixed opinions and just wanted to hear other peoples thoughts.  

There are all kinds of risks we are more, or less, comfortable letting children take.  Skiing is pretty damn risky but like others say, you get training and good equipment, etc. etc.  Football is a catastrophic idea for a sport but it has its appeal and since it is so popular --  parents have to deal with such risk evaluations all the time, against all the benefits of participating in sports.

Dumping a fortune on some "extreme" challenge seems out of line, somehow.  There is some hubris and a smidgen of narcissism in such heroic extreme efforts to break records.  Let me ask you, is that family going to reimburse the fishing boat that went way out of the way to rescue the girl?  

Skiers who make reckless choices are now charged for their own rescue, in Switzerland!

What about the risks involved in the rescue:
   
"French authorities called it a “delicate operation,” and said at one point the fishing boat’s captain fell into the ocean and had to be rescued. "

There is always a place for such daredevil families, I guess these kids are living the exception to the ordinary childhood experience.

I'm not the only one who wondered about the parenting question.  Its coming up now in news reports.... Including this one that quotes the three stories we have mentioned in this thread.  Sucks how they cut the child pyschologist before she gives her professional opinion.

http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/22825103/vp/37649794#37649794



_________________
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18345346

The rate of injury per 1000 athlete-exposures was higher in competition (4.63) than in practice (1.69) (rate ratio [RR] = 2.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.58, 2.90). Of all sports, football had the highest competition (12.09) and practice (2.54) injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures. Compared with injuries sustained during practice, higher proportions of competition injuries were head/face/neck injuries (proportion ratio [PR] = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.34, 1.94), particularly in boys' soccer (PR = 7.74, 95% CI = 2.53, 23.65) and girls' basketball (PR = 6.03, 95% CI = 2.39, 15.22). Competition injuries were more likely to be concussions (PR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.56, 2.62), especially in boys' soccer (PR = 6.94, 95% CI = 2.01, 23.95) and girls' basketball (PR = 5.83, 95% CI = 2.06, 16.49). Higher proportions of competition injuries caused the athlete to miss more than 3 weeks of play (PR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.52), particularly in baseball (PR = 3.47, 95% CI = 1.48, 8.11) and volleyball (PR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.01, 8.24).
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 02:57:24 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2010, 03:25:35 PM »
Seems to me that girl narrowly missed death. So she was healthy and fabulous before she hit the Indian Ocean and is healthy and fabulous now.  But almost died.  

As I said I have mixed opinions and just wanted to hear other peoples thoughts.  



So we can use this kind of logic to say Natalee's parents were bad parents because they let her go to Aruba.  Sending your kid off to compete in the national spelling bee has some inherent risk to it as well, the bus could run off the road.  Trust if most parents had their wish the kids would stay locked up in the closet till their 25 when some common logic has had time to develop.  


Dumping a fortune on some "extreme" challenge seems out of line, somehow.  There is some hubris and a smidgen of narcissism in such heroic extreme efforts to break records.  Let me ask you, is that family going to reimburse the fishing boat that went way out of the way to rescue the girl?  


Vessels on the ocean have to do this all the time.  A captain will never turn down another boat's distress signal... reimbursement is not an issue, it's like some kind of law among boaters or something.

I am surprised at you mecch, I mean you usually see things from a very open-minded point of view.   Perhaps it seems like they are "dumping a fortune" to you and I, but maybe it's pocket change to them, who knows?  Maybe she wanted to do it now because next year she would have been too old to do so...

LOL this just made me think of a video a saw.  What do you think this dad was thinking letting his daughter ride this 4 wheeled beast?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DyQ4MpGXs0&playnext_from=TL&videos=8pK5JZS1gjg
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2010, 03:36:03 PM »
Im of a split mind, I said, skeebo!

More information:  

Again on Saturday, the Sunderlands defended themselves against accusations that they had negligently allowed their daughter to risk her life.

"It wasn’t a flippant decision,"  said Laurence Sunderland, adding that his daughter had spent half her life on the water and was delivering yachts solo at the age of 13. He said he made a few efforts to dissuade her, including showing her the rough seas around Point Concepcion.  And he kept her from pursuing her dream until she was 16 – a few years after she had become taken with the idea of becoming the youngest sailor to circumnavigate the globe.

For a time, her older brother Zac held the title, circling the globe at 17 in 2009 — six months before Abby cast off from Marina del  Rey on Jan. 23.

On the phone after her rescue, Abby told a close friend who was with the family that she’d made a major decision about another challenge. The teen, who along with her six siblings is home-schooled, spoke about  a mock-trial competition coming up after her return.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/06/rescued-sailor-abby-sunderland-steams-homeward.html

Home Schooling!!!  And the brother did it too.

Home schooling for me is red flag of potential, I repeat potential, weirdness in parenting.  Generally I think kids need the socializing of the local culture they get in school.  Not to mention learning from many, professional, teachers.  Home schooling seems potentially hubristic, again.  You fear the potential of a cult like family atmosphere.  


Here is an editorial on this post topic:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/jun/12/adventures-that-inspire-and-infuriate/
Adventures that inspire and infuriate
By Ed Zieralski, UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

The first comment on Abby’s story on signonsandiego.com Friday said the Sunderlands should be charged with “child endangerment.” Experienced sailors called Abby’s voyage this time of year through the Indian Ocean “foolhardy.” Child development experts checked in, fearing other kids, far less fit and prepared, will try and top them.

In San Diego, Roya Kravetz, a certified life coach, was asked about the rise in teens seeking risky adventures.

“When I coach children, I tell them to go for it, and I encourage them to involve their parents in everything they do,” Kravetz said. “But the important thing is there has to be balance in their lives.”

Asked about the Sunderlands’ decision to let their daughter sail on such a dangerous voyage, Kravetz said: “I wouldn’t allow it, but I don’t want to judge them because I don’t know all the circumstances. I can’t say they’re bad parents. But it just doesn’t sound real logical to me, considering the dangers involved.”

Dreams of adventure seldom are logical, and it’s far too late to stop children and their parents from pursuing these “youngest ever to” records. In this country, we have been begging our kids for years to get off the couch, to put the video games away, turn off the TV and go outside. Outdoor magazines promote adventures so extreme that only the fittest of the fit and those with a lot of money, a lot of time, or both, dare attempt them. Danger is big business.

Is it any wonder we have created a generation of adrenaline-seeking kids who dream of scaling the world’s highest peaks or sailing the world’s most dangerous oceans, all before they can attend an R-rated movie without a parent?

But what’s clear about Jordan Romero and Abby Sunderland is that they are two exceptional young people. Their training, their desire to set and reach goals, their strong hearts and wills, combine to separate them from most kids their age.


« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 03:40:05 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2010, 03:38:55 PM »
the brother is cute :)
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2010, 03:48:48 PM »
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/apr/12/should-teenager-climbing-mount-everest

Should a teenager be climbing Mount Everest?

Can a child make a responsible decision to undertake such a risky challenge? Last year a Dutch court placed Laura Dekker into state care to stop her attempt to become the youngest person to sail solo around the world.

So far, Romero has climbed five of the "seven summits" (each continent's highest peak): Kilimanjaro when he was 10, Elbrus in Russia, Aconcagua in Argentina, McKinley in Alaska and, last year, Carstensz Pyramid in Indonesia. Then there is the fact that his father is a paramedic with a speciality in high-altitude physiology. "So he'll know that his child shouldn't be there," says David Hillebrandt, medical adviser to the British Mountaineering Council, who believes that 13 is too young to be exposed to such punishing altitudes.

"Is this harmful for 13-year-olds? No one really knows," says Hugh Montgomery, Professor of Intensive Care Medicine at UCL. But Montgomery points to evidence of a "neurological deficit" caused by altitude: MRI scans showed brain volumes were smaller after climbing Everest. Anecdotally, climbers (including Montgomery, who has been above 8,000 metres) widely report amnesia, while older climbers in their 40s seem far better able to cope with altitude than youngsters.

While Romero has prepared physically by sleeping in a special tent that mimics high altitudes, Hillebrandt questions whether a 13-year-old can be mentally mature enough for such an ascent. "It is totally against the spirit of true mountaineering. This sounds like it's about mass marketing, money and it's verging on child abuse," he says. "In the old days, Everest was scaled only by people with years of experience, who could tie a knot with their eyes shut in a blizzard and had a good record of peaks they had retreated from and survived. Nowadays, people are effectively being winched up, using ropes that sherpas have put in for them. It will all be done for him [Romero]. He's a token passenger."
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2010, 03:54:44 PM »
Ok, now that I've considered a bit more info, and since some of you all think its good enough parenting, based on the info we have, I'm gonna go with - not the best choice by the parents.   :o ::)

“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Dachshund

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2010, 04:13:31 PM »
I prefer parents who kill their children slowly with twinkies and teevee.

Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2010, 04:16:05 PM »
Ok, now that I've considered a bit more info, and since some of you all think its good enough parenting, based on the info we have, I'm gonna go with - not the best choice by the parents.   :o ::)



I would have to be outta my mind to let my daughter do it though.. jus sayin.
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Offline Basquo

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2010, 05:34:47 PM »
Has anyone mentioned pirates?  Would you let your 16-year-old daughter sail around the world by herself with the pirates running around the high seas these days? I just read a story in GQ about how they're sailing beyond their usual territories and ruining tourist sailing in some areas. IF I let my daughter go she would be well-armed, with a panic room and secret scuba-gear.

Did the boy climb Everest by himself? If he was on a team, I'm good with it. I'm assuming someone else took the picture.

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2010, 05:35:05 PM »
I prefer parents who kill their children slowly with twinkies and teevee.

LOL   :o
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline leatherman

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #27 on: June 12, 2010, 05:45:22 PM »
Did the boy climb Everest by himself? If he was on a team, I'm good with it. I'm assuming someone else took the picture.
only five people have reached the top alone
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_climbing_Mount_Everest
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Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2010, 06:20:24 PM »
Climbing Mount Everest is a mixed bag of value. The 1996 year brought publicity to the growing ecological disaster and human waste and exploitation involved in the expansion of this great feat into the realm of "extreme" travel, within the means of people with the training and lots of dough who otherwise have no business up there.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2006/oct/08/conservation.environment
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 06:23:52 PM by mecch »
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Online RapidRod

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2010, 07:25:45 PM »
Has anyone mentioned pirates?  Would you let your 16-year-old daughter sail around the world by herself with the pirates running around the high seas these days? I just read a story in GQ about how they're sailing beyond their usual territories and ruining tourist sailing in some areas. IF I let my daughter go she would be well-armed, with a panic room and secret scuba-gear.

Did the boy climb Everest by himself? If he was on a team, I'm good with it. I'm assuming someone else took the picture.
Nah, he climbed it with his mother and father with a group. His parents had climbed it before.

Offline Matty the Damned

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2010, 06:28:35 PM »
I prefer parents who kill their children slowly with twinkies and teevee.

Indeed. I can't understand why people lose their shit over stuff like this. As the girl who's boat went tits up noted:

As for age, since when does age create gigantic waves and storms?

MtD

Offline leatherman

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2010, 07:13:29 PM »
I just saw on the news that this girl was reunited with her brother and also heard the answer to Mecch's question
Let me ask you, is that family going to reimburse the fishing boat that went way out of the way to rescue the girl?
the family says they can't afford to reimburse the rescue; however France and Australia taxpayers will pick up the tab

Abby Sunderland's parents 'can't afford to pay for rescue'
Australian taxpayers to pay for US teen sailor Abby Sunderland's ocean rescue
Abby Sunderland Rescue: Who Should Pay?
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Offline Matty the Damned

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2010, 07:22:09 PM »
I just saw on the news that this girl was reunited with her brother and also heard the answer to Mecch's questionthe family says they can't afford to reimburse the rescue; however France and Australia taxpayers will pick up the tab

Abby Sunderland's parents 'can't afford to pay for rescue'
Australian taxpayers to pay for US teen sailor Abby Sunderland's ocean rescue
Abby Sunderland Rescue: Who Should Pay?

Australia has obligations to rescue people stranded under these circumstances. We also have arrangements with the US government to assist in affraying the costs associated with such rescues where US citizens or residents are involved.

MTD

Offline leatherman

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2010, 07:31:27 PM »
Australia has obligations to rescue people stranded under these circumstances. We also have arrangements with the US government to assist in affraying the costs associated with such rescues where US citizens or residents are involved.
cool! ;D the way I understood it, and read from many of these articles, according to international conventions only the rescueing countries footed the bill irregardless of the nationally of the rescuee.

Rescues at sea are a no-cost agreement under international conventions regarding maritime search and rescue operations.
"That's not the way the law works," Federal Transport Minister Anthony Albanese told reporters on the weekend. "The Australian taxpayer at the end of the day makes a contribution. But we have to put this in context. If there was an Australian lost at sea we would want ... every effort to be made to save that person."
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Offline Matty the Damned

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2010, 08:17:59 PM »
cool! ;D the way I understood it, and read from many of these articles, according to international conventions only the rescueing countries footed the bill irregardless of the nationally of the rescuee.

Rescues at sea are a no-cost agreement under international conventions regarding maritime search and rescue operations.
"That's not the way the law works," Federal Transport Minister Anthony Albanese told reporters on the weekend. "The Australian taxpayer at the end of the day makes a contribution. But we have to put this in context. If there was an Australian lost at sea we would want ... every effort to be made to save that person."


Yup. The US government is not required to contribute to the costs associated with the rescue of this young woman. The obligation rests on Australia (and the French) to foot the bill. An entirely reasonable situation.

However there have been occasions in the past when the US has contributed financially after the fact where US citizens have been involved.

MtD

Offline mecch

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Re: Is this good parenting?
« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2010, 09:41:02 PM »
Of course the girl should have been rescued.
But for me this is further argument for the irresponsiblity and self-centeredness of this family of "daredevils".
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

 


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