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Author Topic: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?  (Read 4908 times)

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Offline xman

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Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« on: November 19, 2009, 02:10:22 PM »
OK this might be a provocative question but what is in your opinion worse? Smoking cigarettes or engaging in risky sex activities? Both are potentially dangerous and can lead to diseases and death. Smoking is known for causing lung cancer along many other health risks. Unprotected sex is obviously linked to HIV, HBV, HCV, Syphillis and other viruses and bacteria.

I mean what keeps milions of people smoking cigarettes knowing the potential toxicities and consequences? My personal opinion is that no stigma was created (yet) for those who smoke since it is not an infectious disease even if passive smoke is dangerous too. The consequences in years of smoking can be devastating since lung cancer is one of the most terrible conditions. A remission or healing of the tumor is rare and the prognosis is tragic. A friend of me died in 6 months after the diagnosis.

HIV at least is manageable and the prognosis is excellent if diagnosed early.

Your opinions?
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 02:23:10 PM by xman »
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline mecch

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2009, 02:27:58 PM »
The setup seems unwieldy.  Apples and oranges.
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline Tempeboy

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2009, 02:39:36 PM »
Both end up in old fags and used butts.
Roughly roundabout somewhere in the eighteenth or nineteenth century, Sodomite begat Homosexual out of moral, medical and legal models, bequeathing him Identity, who inbred with Nuclear Family and Industrialism to spawn Homophobia.

Dean Kiley

Offline mecch

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2009, 02:43:07 PM »
ick!
“From each, according to his ability; to each, according to his need” 1875 K Marx

Offline carousel

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2009, 03:44:02 PM »
Smoking leaves a nasty smell in your apartment.  And sex, well, you can spray an air freshner or open the window.  Oh and cigarettes are so expensive.

What if you do both?


Offline David_CA

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2009, 04:33:07 PM »
Smoking leaves a nasty smell in your apartment.  And sex, well, you can spray an air freshner or open the window.  Oh and cigarettes are so expensive.

What if you do both?
Then you're really screwed!



Black Friday 03-03-2006
03-23-06 CD4 359 @27.4% VL 75,938
06-01-06 CD4 462 @24.3% VL > 100,000
08-15-06 CD4 388 @22.8% VL >  "
10-21-06 CD4 285 @21.9% VL >  "
  Atripla started 12-01-2006
01-08-07 CD4 429 @26.8% VL 1872!
05-08-07 CD4 478 @28.1% VL 740
08-03-07 CD4 509 @31.8% VL 370
11-06-07 CD4 570 @30.0% VL 140
02-21-08 CD4 648 @32.4% VL 600
05-19-08 CD4 695 @33.1% VL < 48 undetectable!
08-21-08 CD4 725 @34.5%
11-11-08 CD4 672 @39.5%
02-11-09 CD4 773 @36.8%
05-11-09 CD4 615 @36.2%
08-19-09 CD4 770 @38.5%
11-19-09 CD4 944 @33.7%
02-17-10 CD4 678 @39.9%  
06-03-10 CD4 768 @34.9%
09-21-10 CD4 685 @40.3%
01-10-11 CD4 908 @36.3%
05-23-11 CD4 846 @36.8% VL 80
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Offline xman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2009, 05:07:30 PM »
No seriously, the difference is psychological. HIV is linked to a bad behaviour, promiscous sex, homosexuality, drugs. All prejudices from a sterotyped picture delivered in the past by the media during the first AIDS prevention ads. Smoking since old Hollywood movies was presented in a fashioning way, something that makes adult and a member of the group and the society. The history is very different but the endpoint of both activities is similar.

Only in the last years smoking became a nasty activity after class actions and prohibitions hits the population and the tobacco industry. No more smoking actors and a total ban in restaurants and pubs.
In addition warnings on the package and soon even disturbing images. The message is very clear: quit smoking.

Curiously more prevention campains are currently made against smoking than for HIV. It is happening the exact opposite. HIV was accused in the eighties. Cigarerettes are now the evil of the new century. The difference lies in the comunication.
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline Ann

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2009, 05:12:53 PM »

My personal opinion is that no stigma was created (yet) for those who smoke since it is not an infectious disease even if passive smoke is dangerous too.


No stigma? Spoken like a non-smoker who has never had to stand outside the pub in the wind and rain to get a nicotine fix. :-\
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline Dachshund

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2009, 05:15:31 PM »
HIV is linked to a bad behaviour, promiscous sex, homosexuality, drugs. 

And I like to enjoy a cigarette afterward.

Offline leatherman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2009, 05:37:00 PM »
Smoking is known for causing lung cancer along many other health risks. Unprotected sex is obviously linked to HIV, HBV, HCV, Syphillis and other viruses and bacteria.
At most only between 10-15% of smokers actually get cancer (and this is just one reference out of many http://www.netwellness.org/healthtopics/help/risk.cfm). of course not everyone that gets cancer from smoking actually dies, so it's a little fuzzy as too exactly how much of a risk smoking actually is and exactly how "bad" it is. (We need to determine "badness" so we can figure out which is "worse" ;)) I also have to wonder what percentage of people who engage in unprotected sex actually get infected with an STD. Much less how "bad" it is getting say gonorrhea vs HIV or Hep. Figure all that out and you'll probably get a close answer as to which one is riskier.

I noticed that after your first post you reduced it to a smoking vs HIV issue. Well, duh, untreated HIV is a terminal illness while smoking is not even an illness nor does it cause anything like a terminal illness except in a very small percentage of the people who smoke. So in "that" scenario, of course,  HIV is worse than smoking.

I agree with mecch, you're talking apples and oranges. ;)

And I like to enjoy a cigarette afterward.
I'm on day 297 of not smoking and all this talking about smoking is making me really jones for a cig. :P
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline xman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2009, 06:09:07 PM »
Cigarette Smoking
 
The 1982 United States Surgeon General's report stated that "Cigarette smoking is the major single cause of cancer mortality in the United States." This statement is as true today as it was then.

Tobacco use is responsible for nearly 1 in 5 deaths in the United States. Because cigarette smoking and tobacco use are acquired behaviors -- activities that people choose to do -- smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society.

Here is a brief overview of cigarette smoking: who smokes, how smoking affects health, what makes it so hard to quit, and what some of the many rewards of quitting are. For more on this topic, see our Guide to Quitting Smoking.

Who smokes?

Adults

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 43.4 million U.S. adults were current smokers in 2007 (the most recent year for which numbers are available). This is 19.8% of all adults (22.3% of men, 17.4% of women) -- about 1 out of 5 people.

When broken down by race/ethnicity, the numbers were as follows:



Whites  21.4%
African Americans  19.8%
Hispanics  13.3%
American Indians/Alaska Natives  36.4%
Asian Americans  9.6%

There were more cigarette smokers in the younger age groups. In 2007, the CDC reported almost 22.8% of those 25 to 44 years old were current smokers, compared with 8.3% of those aged 65 or older.

High school and middle school students

Nationwide, 20% of high school students were smoking cigarettes in 2007. The most recent survey of middle school students shows that about 6% were smoking cigarettes. In both high schools and middle schools, white and Hispanic students were more likely to smoke cigarettes than other races/ethnicities. (For more information, see our document, Child and Teen Tobacco Use.)

How does smoking cause illness and death?

About half of all Americans who keep smoking will die because of the habit. Each year about 443,600 people in the United States die from illnesses related to tobacco use. Smoking cigarettes kills more Americans than alcohol, car accidents, suicide, AIDS, homicide, and illegal drugs combined.

Cancer caused by smoking

Cigarette smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths. It is linked with an increased risk of the following cancers:

lung
larynx (voice box)
oral cavity (mouth, tongue, and lips)
pharynx (throat)
esophagus (tube connecting the throat to the stomach)
stomach
pancreas
cervix
kidney
bladder
acute myeloid leukemia
Smoking is responsible for almost 9 out of 10 lung cancer deaths. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women, and is one of the hardest cancers to treat. Lung cancer is a disease that can often be prevented. Some religious groups that promote non-smoking as part of their religion, such as Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists, have much lower rates of lung cancer and other smoking-related cancers.

Other health problems caused by smoking

As serious as cancer is, it accounts for less than half of the deaths related to smoking each year. Smoking is a major cause of heart disease, aneurysms, bronchitis, emphysema, and stroke.

Using tobacco can damage a woman's reproductive health and hurt babies. Tobacco use is linked with reduced fertility and a higher risk of miscarriage, early delivery (premature birth), and stillbirth. It is also a cause of low birth-weight in infants. It has been linked to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), too.

Smoking can make pneumonia and asthma worse. It has been linked to other health problems, too, including gum disease, cataracts, bone thinning, hip fractures, and peptic ulcers. Some studies have also linked smoking to macular degeneration, an eye disease that can cause blindness.

Smoking can cause or worsen poor blood flow in the arms and legs (peripheral vascular disease or PVD.) Surgery to improve the blood flow often doesn't work in people who keep smoking. Because of this, many surgeons who work on blood vessels (vascular surgeons) won't do certain surgeries on patients with PVD unless they stop smoking.

Some studies have found that male smokers may be more likely to be sexually impotent (have erectile dysfunction).

The smoke from cigarettes (called secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke) can also have harmful health effects on those exposed to it. Adults and children can have health problems from breathing secondhand smoke. (See our documents, Secondhand Smoke and Women and Smoking.)

Effects of smoking on how long you live and your quality of life

Based on data collected from 1995 to 1999, the CDC estimated that adult male smokers lost an average of 13.2 years of life and female smokers lost 14.5 years of life because of smoking.

But not all of the health problems related to smoking result in deaths. Smoking affects a smoker's health in many ways, harming nearly every organ of the body and causing diseases. According to the CDC, in 2000 about 8.6 million people had at least one chronic disease because they smoked or had smoked. Many of these people were suffering from more than one smoking-related problem. The diseases seen most often were chronic bronchitis, emphysema, heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. These diseases can steal away a person's quality of life long before death. Smoking-related illness can limit a person's daily life by making it harder to breathe, get around, work, or play.

Taking care of yourself

If you have used tobacco in any form, now or in the past, tell your health care provider so he or she can be sure that you have right preventive health care. It is well known that smoking puts you at risk for certain health problems. This means part of your health care should focus on related screening and preventive measures to help you stay as healthy as possible.

For example, your doctor may recommend that you check the inside of your mouth regularly for any changes. If you do find any changes or problems, you should have an oral exam done by your doctor or dentist. The American Cancer Society recommends that medical check-ups should include mouth (oral cavity) exams. By doing this, tobacco users may be able to find changes such as leukoplakia (white patches on the membranes in the mouth) early. This may help prevent oral cancer.

You should also be aware of any of the following:

any change in a cough (for example, you cough up more phlegm or mucus than usual)
a new cough
coughing up blood
hoarseness
trouble breathing
wheezing
chest pain
loss of appetite
weight loss
feeling tired all the time (fatigue)
frequent lung or respiratory infections (like pneumonia or bronchitis)
Any of these could be signs of problems with the lungs or other parts of the respiratory system and should be reported to a doctor right away.

Smokers are at higher risk for lung cancer. But lung cancer often doesn't cause symptoms until it is advanced (has spread), and at this time there are no widely recommended screening tests for this cancer. The American Cancer Society recommends that people who are at increased risk for lung cancer, such as smokers, former smokers, or people who have been exposed to secondhand smoke, be aware of their lung cancer risk. If you are in this group, talk with your doctor about your likelihood of developing lung cancer and about the potential benefits and risks of lung cancer screening. After discussing what is and is not known about the value of early lung cancer detection, if you and your doctor decide in favor of testing, then be sure to have it done at a center that has experience in all aspects of testing people at high risk.

If you have any health concerns that you think may be caused by your cigarette smoking, please see a health care provider right away. Taking care of yourself and getting treatment for problems before they get worse will improve your chances for successful treatment. Still, the best way to take care of yourself and decrease your risk for life-threatening lung problems is to quit smoking.

What is in tobacco?

Cigarettes, cigars, and spit and pipe tobacco are made from dried tobacco leaves, as well as ingredients added for flavor and other reasons. More than 4,000 different chemicals have been found in tobacco and tobacco smoke. Among these are more than 60 chemicals that are known to cause cancer (carcinogens).

Many substances are added to cigarettes by manufacturers to enhance the flavor or to make smoking more pleasant. Some of the compounds found in tobacco smoke include ammonia, tar, and carbon monoxide. Exactly what effects these substances have on the cigarette smoker's health is unknown, but there is no evidence that lowering the tar content of a cigarette lowers the health risk.

As of now, cigarette manufacturers are not required to give out information to the public about the additives used in cigarettes, which has made it harder to determine their possible health risks. But with the passage of a new federal law, manufacturers must submit lists of ingredients to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) starting in 2010. The FDA will make lists of harmful ingredients available to the public by or before June 2013.

Nicotine addiction

Addiction is marked by the repeated, compulsive seeking or use of a substance despite its harmful effects and unwanted consequences. Addiction is defined as physical and psychological (mental and emotional) dependence on the substance. Nicotine is the addictive drug in tobacco. Regular use of tobacco products leads to addiction in many users.

In 1988, the U.S. Surgeon General concluded the following:

Cigarettes and other forms of tobacco are addicting.
Nicotine is the addicting drug in tobacco.
The ways people become addicted to tobacco are much like those that lead to addiction to other drugs such as heroin and cocaine.
These statements are as true today as they were then. All forms of tobacco have a lot of nicotine. It is easily absorbed through the lungs with smoking and through the mouth or nose with oral tobacco (spit, snuff, or smokeless tobacco). From these entry points, nicotine quickly spreads throughout the body.

Tobacco companies are required by law to report nicotine levels in cigarettes to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). But in most states they are not required to show the amount of nicotine on the cigarette package label. The actual amount of nicotine available to the smoker in a given brand of cigarettes is often different from the level reported to the FTC. In one regular cigarette, the average amount of nicotine the smoker gets ranges between about 1 mg and 2 mg. But the cigarette itself contains more nicotine than this. The amount people actually take in depends on how they smoke, how many puffs they take, how deeply they inhale, and other factors.

How powerful is nicotine addiction?

About 70% of smokers say they want to quit and about 40% try to quit each year, but only 4% to 7% succeed without help. This is because smokers not only become physically addicted to nicotine; there is a strong emotional (psychological) aspect and they often link smoking with many social activities. All of these factors make smoking a hard habit to break.

Why quit smoking?

Nicotine is a very addictive drug. People usually try to quit many times before they are successful. But the struggle can be worth the effort. In September 1990, the U.S. Surgeon General outlined what you gain when you quit smoking:

Quitting smoking has major health benefits that start right away. This is true for people who already have a smoking-related disease as well as those who don't.
Former smokers live longer than people who keep smoking. For example, people who quit smoking before age 50 have one-half the risk of dying in the next 15 years compared with people who keep smoking.
Quitting smoking lowers the risk of lung cancer, other cancers, heart attack, stroke, and chronic lung diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
Women who stop smoking before they get pregnant, or even during the first 3 to 4 months of pregnancy, reduce their risk of having a low birth-weight baby to that of women who never smoked.
The health benefits of quitting smoking are far greater than any risks from the weight gain or any emotional or psychological problems that may follow quitting.
Your risk of having lung cancer and other smoking-related cancers depends on how much you have been exposed to cigarette smoke over your lifetime. This is measured by the number of cigarettes you smoked each day, how you smoked them, how young you were when you started smoking, and the number of years you have smoked. There is no way to precisely measure a person's risk of getting cancer, but the more you smoke and the longer you do it, the greater your risk.

The good news is that the risk of having lung cancer and other smoking-related illnesses can be reduced if you stop smoking. The risk of lung cancer is less in people who quit smoking than in people who keep smoking the same number of cigarettes every day. The risk decreases as the number of years since quitting increases.

People who stop smoking while they are young get the greatest health benefits from quitting. Those who quit in their 30s may avoid most of the risk due to tobacco use. But even smokers who quit after age 50 largely reduce their risk of dying early. The argument that it is too late to quit smoking because the damage is already done is not true. It is never too late to quit smoking!

Source:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_10_2x_Cigarette_Smoking.asp
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline Dachshund

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2009, 06:15:21 PM »
Bottle in front of me or a frontal lobotomy. What is worse?

Offline xman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2009, 06:18:24 PM »
Bottle in front of me or a frontal lobotomy. What is worse?


Good question. ;)
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline xman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2009, 06:37:29 PM »



 :)
« Last Edit: November 19, 2009, 06:45:08 PM by xman »
sign the petition launched by the aids policy project addressed to the nih aimed to increase the money needed to find the cure:

http://www.aidspolicyproject.org/petition_for_the_nih

we can make a difference and we need to fight. please support them! it doesn't cost you anything. they need it now more than ever!

Offline BT65

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2009, 06:57:23 PM »
No more smoking actors and a total ban in restaurants and pubs.

That is not totally true.  Did you ever watch The Sopranos, or more recently, Madmen?  On Madmen, they smoke all the time, in almost every scene.  And about the restaurants..... in my area, there's still smoking in the "bar" section of restaurants, if it has a separate door. 
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline Ann

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2009, 07:26:05 PM »
Maybe those inclined to spend their days worrying about this stuff ad nauseum could just buy themselves plastic bubbles to live in. Oh, but then of course you'd have the worry of being surrounded by materials made of petro-chemicals. Oh woe is me, you just can't win!

I'd rather have a bottleinfrontofme, along with a pack of ciggies, thank you very much! Hell, we all gotta die of something and I'd rather go out smiling than pulling my hair out with worry. All things in moderation, including moderation! (moderation of any sort, that is!) ;D
Condoms are a girl's best friend

Condom and Lube Info  



"...health will finally be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for." Kofi Annan

Nymphomaniac: a woman as obsessed with sex as an average man. Mignon McLaughlin

HIV is certainly character-building. It's made me see all of the shallow things we cling to, like ego and vanity. Of course, I'd rather have a few more T-cells and a little less character. Randy Shilts

Offline leatherman

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2009, 08:37:12 PM »
according to the World Health Org

Quote
According to estimates by WHO and UNAIDS, 33 million people were living with HIV at the end of 2007. That same year, some 2.7 million people became newly infected, and 2.0 million died of AIDS, including 270 000 children. Two thirds of HIV infections are in sub-Saharan Africa.
http://www.who.int/features/qa/71/en/index.html

Quote
Every year, more than one million people die from lung cancer globally, and indoor air pollution is responsible for approximately 1.5% of these deaths.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs292/en/index.html

Quote
Worldwide it was estimated in 2004 that 1.2 million people were killed (2.2% of all deaths) and 50 million more were injured in motor vehicle collisions. This makes motor vehicle collisions the leading cause of death among children worldwide 10 – 19 years old (260,000 children die a year, 10 million are injured) and the sixth leading preventable cause of death in the United States (45,800 people died and 2.4 million were injured in 2005).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision#cite_note-who.int-0
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/publications/road_traffic/world_report/en/index.html

Quote
World  Deaths in millions  % of deaths 
Coronary heart disease  7.20  12.2 
Stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases  5.71  9.7 
Lower respiratory infections  4.18  7.1 
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  3.02  5.1 
Diarrhoeal diseases  2.16  3.7 
HIV/AIDS  2.04  3.5 
Tuberculosis  1.46  2.5 
Trachea, bronchus, lung cancers  1.32  2.3
Road traffic accidents  1.27  2.2 
Prematurity and low birth weight  1.18  2.0 
(sorry the chart didn't copy over nicely)

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs310/en/index.html
of course, the stats shift around some for low-middle-high income countries
in higher income nations, more people (approx three times as many) die from dietary-related issues than lung cancer (and 10-15% of lung cancer is not caused by smoking)

Quote
High-income countries  Deaths in millions  % of deaths 
Coronary heart disease  1.33  16.3 
Stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases  0.76  9.3 
Trachea, bronchus, lung cancers  0.48  5.9

the end result of all these figures, instead of guessing which things are "bad" and which aren't, is that world-wide, AIDS kills twice as many people as year as people that die from lung cancer, and nearly the same amount of people die in car accidents as from lung cancer. Of course, not all AIDS cases are from unprotected sex just as all lung cancer is not from cigarette smoking; but assuming 90% in each case (and not looking up and adding the stats for deaths by other STDs), I will venture the opinion then that unprotected sex is worse than cigarette smoking, with being in a car following pretty close.
leatherman (aka mIkIE)


chart from 1992-2013; updated 2/09/13  Reyataz/Norvir/Truvada

Offline bocker3

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2009, 10:02:33 PM »
I think you are missing the worst thing of all:  being born!!

Statistics show that 100% of people who are born, will die as a result of it!

Food for thought............
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Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2009, 10:52:56 PM »


  To hell with which one is worse, I'm trying to weigh out which one is better!
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline StacheBC

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2009, 11:14:37 PM »
Although I haven't smoked in 5 years... I'd trade my HIV for a pack of cigs any day. ;)

Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #20 on: November 21, 2009, 02:00:30 PM »


   The question is : Smoking or unprotected sex.  What is worse?

    There is no mention of std's, HIV, babies, pain, disappointment in size...  nope nothing.  It just says which one is worse.  You all read too much into these things, the answer is simple.  I would say even as a smoker myself that unprotected sex is much more satisfying that smoking, so that makes smoking worse than sex......  If you ask me after sex though I might answer this question differently. ;)
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

Offline Dale Parker

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2009, 03:20:14 PM »
Why does everyone pick on us smokers.?????? Why not pick on drinkers, drug users, or obese people.
In the last few years the media has attacked smokers and overweight people and drug users with about equal amounts of distain. Have you ever noticed that when they do a report on smokers they show the smokers faces but with overweight people and drug users they only show them from the neck down (for the most part).  I think that's a form of discrimination against smokers. Although I'm average weight and smoke I do know some chronically obese people and it seems equally as difficult to control your weight as it is for a smoker to give it up.
 Now that I have finished ranting: I think unprotected sex is worse. Smoking has it's drawbacks (lung and skin effects and cancers). Most times the serious consequences happen to the smoker rather than the second hand smoker. I think that having constantly unprotected sex will get you a disease faster than smoking a pack or two a day. You also have a greater chance of passing a STD thru unprotected sex than a smoker passing along a smoking related problem to a non smoker.
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Offline Assurbanipal

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #22 on: November 22, 2009, 03:25:54 PM »
Why does everyone pick on us smokers.?????? Why not pick on drinkers, drug users, or obese people.
In the last few years the media has attacked smokers and overweight people and drug users with about equal amounts of distain. Have you ever noticed that when they do a report on smokers they show the smokers faces but with overweight people and drug users they only show them from the neck down (for the most part).  I think that's a form of discrimination against smokers. Although I'm average weight and smoke I do know some chronically obese people and it seems equally as difficult to control your weight as it is for a smoker to give it up.
 Now that I have finished ranting: I think unprotected sex is worse. Smoking has it's drawbacks (lung and skin effects and cancers). Most times the serious consequences happen to the smoker rather than the second hand smoker. I think that having constantly unprotected sex will get you a disease faster than smoking a pack or two a day. You also have a greater chance of passing a STD thru unprotected sex than a smoker passing along a smoking related problem to a non smoker.

Maybe I'm just not enough of a voyeur...

 but I'm having some trouble getting my head around the concept of second-hand unprotected sex? 

Perhaps you could draw us a picture?   ;D
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2010 VL UD CD4 573-680 26.1% - 30.9% 12/10 VL 20
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Offline David_CA

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #23 on: November 22, 2009, 04:56:55 PM »
Unprotected sex can be OK and harmless.  Smoking is never harmless (in terms of what it does to one's body).  Being in a house where people smoke is often pretty nasty, too.  Move a picture and that clean spot is pretty evident.  'Second-hand unprotected sex' was mentioned... that can be pretty hot if it's porn or perhaps watching folks doing it!  ;) Who'd want to sit around and watch people smoke?

As to why folks 'pick on us smokers'... I think it's because, personally, it's nasty.  Smoker's clothes generally stink, cigarette butts are in rivers, lakes, on streets and sidewalks, yards, etc.  Smokers are generally addicted to smoking; the same cannot be said of most drinkers or drug users.  Now, I think that you'd have a more equal comparison if you were comparing smoking, alcoholism, or to being a junkie. 



Why does everyone pick on us smokers.?????? Why not pick on drinkers, drug users, or obese people.
In the last few years the media has attacked smokers and overweight people and drug users with about equal amounts of distain. Have you ever noticed that when they do a report on smokers they show the smokers faces but with overweight people and drug users they only show them from the neck down (for the most part).  I think that's a form of discrimination against smokers. Although I'm average weight and smoke I do know some chronically obese people and it seems equally as difficult to control your weight as it is for a smoker to give it up.
 Now that I have finished ranting: I think unprotected sex is worse. Smoking has it's drawbacks (lung and skin effects and cancers). Most times the serious consequences happen to the smoker rather than the second hand smoker. I think that having constantly unprotected sex will get you a disease faster than smoking a pack or two a day. You also have a greater chance of passing a STD thru unprotected sex than a smoker passing along a smoking related problem to a non smoker.
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Offline Assurbanipal

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #24 on: November 22, 2009, 05:17:15 PM »
Unprotected sex can be OK and harmless.  Smoking is never harmless (in terms of what it does to one's body).  Being in a house where people smoke is often pretty nasty, too.  Move a picture and that clean spot is pretty evident.  'Second-hand unprotected sex' was mentioned... that can be pretty hot if it's porn or perhaps watching folks doing it!  ;) Who'd want to sit around and watch people smoke?


I get the second hand sex part.   It's the "unprotected".  What are we protecting against here?  Eyeball strain?   ;D
5/06 VL 1M+, CD4 22, 5% , pneumonia, thrush -- O2 support 2 months, 6/06 +Kaletra/Truvada
9/06 VL 3959 CD4 297 13.5% 12/06 VL <400 CD4 350 15.2% +Pravachol
2007 VL<400, 70, 50 CD4 408-729 16.0% -19.7%
2008 VL UD CD4 468 - 538 16.7% - 24.6% Osteoporosis 11/08 doubled Pravachol, +Calcium/D
02/09 VL 100 CD4 616 23.7% 03/09 VL 130 5/09 VL 100 CD4 540 28.4% +Actonel (osteoporosis) 7/09 VL 130
8/09  new regimen Isentress/Epzicom 9/09 VL UD CD4 621 32.7% 11/09 VL UD CD4 607 26.4% swap Isentress for Prezista/Norvir 12/09 (liver and muscle issues) VL 50
2010 VL UD CD4 573-680 26.1% - 30.9% 12/10 VL 20
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Offline Ann

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #25 on: November 23, 2009, 08:35:30 AM »

Who'd want to sit around and watch people smoke?


Depends on what they're smoking. Watching people smoke pot can be a laugh. :D
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Offline David_CA

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #26 on: November 23, 2009, 09:00:18 AM »
Depends on what they're smoking. Watching people smoke pot can be a laugh. :D

You got me there!  Watching them smoke pot and then have sex can be pretty funny, too!
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  Atripla started 12-01-2006
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05-08-07 CD4 478 @28.1% VL 740
08-03-07 CD4 509 @31.8% VL 370
11-06-07 CD4 570 @30.0% VL 140
02-21-08 CD4 648 @32.4% VL 600
05-19-08 CD4 695 @33.1% VL < 48 undetectable!
08-21-08 CD4 725 @34.5%
11-11-08 CD4 672 @39.5%
02-11-09 CD4 773 @36.8%
05-11-09 CD4 615 @36.2%
08-19-09 CD4 770 @38.5%
11-19-09 CD4 944 @33.7%
02-17-10 CD4 678 @39.9%  
06-03-10 CD4 768 @34.9%
09-21-10 CD4 685 @40.3%
01-10-11 CD4 908 @36.3%
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Offline Jeff G

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2009, 09:00:33 AM »
Bill Clinton never inhaled and Ann just likes to watch .... interesting LOL .  

Offline skeebo1969

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Re: Smoking or unprotected sex. What is worse?
« Reply #28 on: November 23, 2009, 10:25:08 AM »


  God I hate the word pot.... reminds me of my step father and his damn Coast Guardish ways!
I despise the song Love is in the Air, you should too.

 


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