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Author Topic: Dry skin: med specific?  (Read 2693 times)

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Offline loop78

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  • Posts: 147
Dry skin: med specific?
« on: July 30, 2009, 09:03:19 AM »
Hi everyone,

Since I started atripla 3 months ago I've been noticing my skin has become dryer.

Do not get me wrong, I know it's something minor and just applying some moisturizing cream when I remember seems to do the trick, but I'm kind of curious about whether this is some specific side effect related to one of the atripla components or just a generic effect of immune reconstitution.

Fact is I used to have oily skin prone to acne (had to take retin-a twice in my teens), and since I seroconverted, before starting meds, I had been noticing my acne was getting progressively worse.

Ever since I started atripla my skin has cleared up completely, to the point it reminds me of the times I was on retin-A.

Anyway, as you can see, right now this is to me more of a blessing than a curse, but I was curious about its cause.

Thanks in advance!

Offline elf

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2009, 04:30:56 AM »
°Hola!
Like yourself, prior to seroconversion, I had a very oily skin.
Now my skin is dry, and prone to desquamating.
From what I've read, it has nothing to do with therapy but with the virus.  :-\
I've tried numerous moisturizing creams but they make my skin
very red and burning, even those labeled as ''neutral'' and fatfree.

Now the only thing I'm using is virgin olive oil, I have no allergic reactions to it,
and it makes my skin smooth. I am also using Vichy RetiFill (just in case).
You have to experiment a bit, in order to get the right thing for you.
Everyone's skin is different.

kiss and a hug
 ;)
Let's have a Kiki!

Offline BT65

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2009, 07:11:11 AM »
Loop,

I've found just since being positive, my skin got drier.  Now that I'm getting older as well, it can get really dry, to the point of flaking.

I try to hold this at bay by using lotion every time I shower, and using Eucerin Intense Moisture on the really rough spots.  It does work pretty good.  Of course, if yours is bothersome, and nothing seems to be working, I would talk to the doctor.

BTW, I also had acne as a teen.  But now, I use cheap wrinkle cream to moisturize.  Good luck.
  Luv,
Betty
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2009, 08:00:04 AM »
It's called "seborrheic dermatitis" and almost everyone with HIV has it.  Just google the term + HIV and read about it.  There also might be something in the lessons section at the top of the AIDSmeds page, but I can't remember and I'm too lazy to look.

It's not anything to do with HIV meds, it's just something that happens with a compromised immune system.  You need to consider the fact that your skin is basically your largest body organ, and it's the one that's fully exposed to the elements.  Personally I have found that the daily application of a facial cleanser that contains glycolic acid will remove the layer of dead skin cells on your face that are the cause of dermatitis issues, and result in inflammation and redness.  This is something you have to stay on top of if you have it.  Doing this once a week won't work.

If you've allowed this condition to get really bad you can obtain prescription topical solutions, and there are various ones.  You'll need to use them for about a month, and they can be a bit oily looking so put it on at bedtime and use a towel over your cheapest set of bed sheets.

source

Quote
Seborrheic dermatitis is a common disease that affects 2%-4% of the general population. However, up to 85% of HIV-infected people experience seborrheic dermatitis at some time after they acquire the infection. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown, but many investigators believe the yeast, Pityrosporum ovale, plays a role in the disease. It is further postulated that the alteration of the immune system in HIV-AIDS changes the way the skin responds to this yeast leading to the higher rate of infection.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2009, 08:06:40 AM »
btw, if you decide to ever go the route with a dermatologist, make sure it's someone who has treated a lot of HIV patients -- any other derm will possibly label it rosacea or eczema, etc.  I went through three dermatologists in NYC back in the 90's before I got a proper diagnosis.  These days frankly you shouldn't even have to go see a dermatologist.  A proper experienced HIV specialist should just be able to handle this.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline loop78

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2009, 09:27:47 AM »
Thanks a lot your answers Elf, Betty and Philly.

I'm sorry if I didn't make myself clear, but I'm not really bothered by this newfound skin of mine. After enduring years of acneic skin I'll take having to apply some moisturizer over what I had before without a single regret. Even if it's caused by a very mild hiv related skin condition.

It's just since I seroconverted my acne had been flaring up like I was back in high school, and then cleared up completely in the three months I've been taking atripla.

I'll keep an eye on it in case it gets out of hand... and get some cheap bed sheets! ;-)

Hugs!

Offline TNDude

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2009, 09:41:50 PM »
I use lotion daily after I shower so I've not really experienced dry skin on my body. However, I have some mild dandruff on my scalp that I can not get rid of. I have tried coal tar shampoo and it does not seem to help.

Offline mecch

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2009, 10:47:27 PM »
It's called "seborrheic dermatitis" and almost everyone with HIV has it.  Just google the term + HIV and read about it.  There also might be something in the lessons section at the top of the AIDSmeds page, but I can't remember and I'm too lazy to look.

It's not anything to do with HIV meds, it's just something that happens with a compromised immune system.
source


Hmm - I had that when I started HAART.  The doc said it was a symptom of IRS - Immune reconstitution - and that it would disappear, and it has.  So, is it true, "almost everyone with HIV has it"?   Do I "have it" but it is sleeping??
ďFrom each, according to his ability; to each, according to his needĒ 1875 K Marx

Offline elf

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2009, 08:21:14 PM »
I've finally found a solution for "seborrheic dermatitis".
It's called clotrimazole http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotrimazole
I use it daily putting it on my T-zone and there's no problems with red skin.  :)
All those commercial hydratant creams made my skin even worse because of allergy they gave me.  :(

Skin health is a good indicator of your immune system condition, when I started meds I had to shave every day because my skin was allergic to my own beard, now I can grow a beard for some days with no red skin.  :o I guess/hope my CD4% is going up.  :)
« Last Edit: August 22, 2009, 08:26:15 PM by elf »
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Offline Rev. Moon

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Re: Dry skin: med specific?
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2009, 09:06:30 PM »

Skin health is a good indicator of your immune system condition, when I started meds I had to shave every day because my skin was allergic to my own beard, now I can grow a beard for some days with no red skin.  :o I guess/hope my CD4% is going up.  :)

Same here Elf, right after seroconversion I became ashy and as dry as a crisp (and my beard was irritating me as well); even my scalp looked crappy after I went to the barber.  Luckily, Lubriderm and other lotions worked well for me (along with increased hydration).  Nowadays, in just two months or so, I'm back to normal and was able to go back to my [pre-HIV] Abe Lincoln look.  Indeed our systems are improving  ;)
"I have tried hard--but life is difficult, and I am a very useless person. I can hardly be said to have an independent existence. I was just a screw or a cog in the great machine I called life, and when I dropped out of it I found I was of no use anywhere else."

 


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