HIV Prevention and Testing > Am I Infected?

Resistance to AIDS virus

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Jeffrey200:

Hi

I was reading recently about the gene that creates resistance to HIV in humans.  I gather up to 10-20% of the population can have the gene, and some have 2 copies which makes them very resistant to infection.  I found this website www.delta32.com.au and got tested.  It was really interesting to know I had a copy of the gene.  Anyway, thought this might be useful for people wanting to find out more about their genetic makeup.  I was wondering if anyone else has tried this test as well?

Jeff

Ann:
Jeff,

You need to know that just because you have that gene doesn't mean you are totally immune to hiv infection. You need to be using condoms for anal or vaginal intercourse, every time, no exceptions until such time as you are in a securely monogamous relationship where you have both tested for ALL STIs together. To agree to have unprotected intercourse is to consent to the possibility of being infected with a sexually transmitted infection.

Have a look through the condom and lube links in my signature line so you can use condoms with confidence.

Please also read through the Welcome Thread so you can familiarize yourself with our Forum Posting Guidelines and also follow the Lessons links.

Ann

NYER29:
I smell a scam here and it looks like someone is trying to peddle thier test on this website preying on the insecurities of myself and the rest worried folk on this board...



scarycat:
No. It is not a scam. There was actually a documentary on PBS about the mutation. It is more prevalent in Europen populations because it also  provides some resistance to the plague.

RapidRod:
Itís not an airtight guarantee of never getting AIDS. Some unusual types of HIV can use other proteins for entering cells. Rarely have there been people who have two mutant CCR5 genes who have died from AIDS.

Also, CCR5 is not the whole story of immunity to HIV infection. Some resistant people have been found who have two perfectly normal copies of CCR5. So other genes also contribute to slowing down HIV infection, and scientists are busy trying to identify them.

The usefulness of this work is mainly in how it helps us understand how the virus works and points to new possibilities for drugs to treat infection.

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