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Author Topic: Vitamin D  (Read 34095 times)

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Offline pos2007

  • Member
  • Posts: 116
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #50 on: November 07, 2009, 03:12:46 PM »
I was severely deficient  in D from about 2000  through 2008.  Took 2000 IU D3 daily till I  finally  got  on  track. Now I  take 1000 IU  of D3 daily.  I  am  sure the deficiency was due to HIV because it was before the Atripla  was started 01/2008 and when  the  problem first came  up,  I was spending  A LOT.  of time  in  the  sun.

 I think a lot  of  the  meds can really skew your system  though.
 current prescribed med  list:
Ambien CR 12.5 mg
Allegra 180 mg
Atripla
Optivar 0.5%
Omnaris 50MCS
Astelin 137 MCG
Prednisone 10 MG
Lipovlavinoid +B  2x Daily
Vitamin D3 1000IU 1x daily
Pentoxifylline CR 400MG 3X daily
Carnitine 250 MG capsule 8x daily
Cialas  5MG 1x every other day
Trimix PGE 8.33 injection .35 cc 3x weekly
Vitamin E 400 IU  softgel  1 tablet 3xdaily
Folic acid deleated due to  prostate cancer.

I am  just a lab beaker about to spew like a  shook up can  of  soda.  I  found out this summer that I  have also lost 1"  in  height as measured in  the  hospital which  can only be attributed to bone deficiency.

« Last Edit: November 07, 2009, 03:14:24 PM by pos2007 »
Diagnosed  CD4 138 VL. 38,000
Partner Diagnosed CD4 <20  VL.  488,000

Offline J.R.E.

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,099
  • Joined Dec-2003 Living positive, since 1985.
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #51 on: November 10, 2009, 12:58:34 AM »
Hi,

According to my last blood test, My vitamin D was low. So, the doctor wrote a prescription for Vitamin D 50000-IU capsules.

I started today. I am to take one capsule a week, for 4 weeks, and then one capsule a month thereafter. We'll see how this goes.


Take care---Ray




The above post was made on May 12th.  I am happy to report that my Vitamin D is back in the normal range again !

Ray
Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

 As of 6/4/14,  t-cells are at 423, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 13% 

  
 62 years young.

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #52 on: November 10, 2009, 01:05:24 PM »

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #53 on: November 11, 2009, 09:44:18 AM »

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #54 on: November 15, 2009, 06:27:15 AM »


More Evidence of Low Vitamin D in People Taking Antiretrovirals
 
 
 
  12th European AIDS Conference, November 11-13, 2009, Cologne, Germany
 
Mark Mascolini
 
A 102-patient report from an HIV clinic in Bolzano, Italy [1] adds to the data suggesting a high rate of vitamin D deficiency in people with HIV [2]. Low vitamin D quotients threaten HIV-infected people not only because D plays a critical role in bone metabolism, but also--perhaps--because of recently uncovered interactions between vitamin D and the immune system.
 
Oswald Moling and colleagues at Bolzano's General Hospital observed that, without vitamin D, only 10% to 15% of dietary calcium is absorbed, and only about 60% of phosphorus [3]. Yet 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D) levels often go unreported in studies of hypophosphatemia and bone deficits in people with HIV. Protease inhibitors can impair activation of vitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [4], and some evidence suggests efavirenz increases vitamin D inactivation and thereby contributes to vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia [5,6].
 
Circulating 25(OH)D levels are considered the best indicator of vitamin D status [2]. Moling and coworkers repeatedly measured 25(OH)D in 102 consecutive patients in the winter and spring. Everyone lived in the Alpine area of northern Italy and was taking antiretroviral therapy. Vitamin D levels dip in winter, when exposure to sunlight it lower.
 
Only 18 of these 102 people (18%) had vitamin D quotients matching the recommended level of at least 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L). Four of the 18 with stout vitamin D readings had spent their holidays in a tropical country. Thirty-six people (35%) had levels below 10 ng/mL (25 nmol/L).
 
Eighteen people (18%) had hypophosphatemia (phosphorus below 2.5 mg/dL or 0.8 mmol/L). Seventeen of these 18 also had low vitamin D concentrations. People with low vitamin D took 1400 to 2000 IU of 25(OH)D daily or 10,000 to 14,000 IU once weekly to regain healthy levels. Only 40 of 84 people (48%) with a first vitamin D reading below 30 ng/mL regained a normal level through supplementation.
 
This study is limited because there is no comparison group of people without HIV from the same region. But unlike some other studies in people with HIV, it measured vitamin D over time and gauged the impact of supplementation.
 
The investigators believe research is showing that vitamin D is "not only a predictor of bone health but is also an independent predictor of risk reduction for infection, autoimmune, cardiovascular, psychiatric diseases, and cancer" [7,8].
 
Reviewing vitamin D readings in HIV studies, Harvard's Eduardo Villamor notes that low D levels have been found in some but not all groups [2]. Limitations of these studies, Villamor writes, "preclude the exclusion of vitamin D deficiency as a potentially serious problem among HIV-infected individuals, particularly in populations with limited exposure to sunlight for cultural or geographical reasons."


More evidence to have your vitamin D levels tested!

v

Offline bufguy

  • Member
  • Posts: 161
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #55 on: November 15, 2009, 06:47:03 PM »
My first labs included vitamin D levels as my doc stated that HIV antiretrovirals can inhibit the proper absorbtion of Vitamin. She did state that the majority of people who live in the northeast have low vitamin D levels....I live in Buffalo...need I say more. My initial reading was 29nl/mg, not horrible. I now take 5000i.u per day and I have been running outdoors more often.  Last test showed 57...almost double in 1 year.
5/29/08 confirmed HIV+
6/23/08 Vl 47500  CD4 511/29% CD8 .60
start atripla
8/1/08 Vl 130  CD4 667/31% CD8 .70
9/18/08 Vl un  CD4 not tested
12/19/08 Vl un CD4 723/32% CD8 .80
4/3/09 Vl un CD4 615/36% CD8  .98
8/7/09 vl un CD4 689/35% CD8 .9
12/11/09 vl un CD4 712/38% CD8 .89
4/9/10 vl un CD4 796/39% CD8 1.0
8/20/10 vl un CD4 787/38% CD8 1.0
4/6/10 vl un CD4 865/35% CD8 .9
8/16/10 vl un CD4 924/37% CD8 1.0
12/23/10 vl un CD4 1006/35% CD8 .9
5/2/10 vl un CD4 1040/39% CD8 .9
8/7/13 vl un CD4 840/39% CD8 .9

Offline J.R.E.

  • Member
  • Posts: 7,099
  • Joined Dec-2003 Living positive, since 1985.
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2009, 07:18:42 PM »
She did state that the majority of people who live in the northeast have low vitamin D levels....I live in Buffalo...need I say more.


Isn't that the truth !!   :)  We always used to kid, that Buffalo only had two seasons, snow and rain. I'm from North Tonawanda originally !!


 Glad to hear that you vitamin D is up again !!


Ray



Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

 As of 6/4/14,  t-cells are at 423, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 13% 

  
 62 years young.

Offline tokyodecadence

  • Member
  • Posts: 234
  • A one room disco.
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2009, 07:27:34 PM »
My first labs included vitamin D levels as my doc stated that HIV antiretrovirals can inhibit the proper absorbtion of Vitamin. She did state that the majority of people who live in the northeast have low vitamin D levels....I live in Buffalo...need I say more. My initial reading was 29nl/mg, not horrible. I now take 5000i.u per day and I have been running outdoors more often.  Last test showed 57...almost double in 1 year.


I got a similar speech from my doctor. She tests all of her patients for their vitamin levels, and the fact that we live in the Pacific Northwest takes a toll on the vitamin D levels. I had a level of 25, so I'm on a once a week prescription for 12 weeks, then a once a day tablet for the rest of the year.
[.Fod„o.]

Offline risred1

  • Member
  • Posts: 419
  • My Source for Supps - www.newyorkbuyersclub.org
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #58 on: November 17, 2009, 03:09:43 AM »
Clearly, Vitamin D is important and its easy to have deficiencies from inadequate exposure to sunlight or low levels from med interaction.

Personally I do take a supplement depending on how much Sun I'm getting... Less in the Summer, and starting in the fall, Daily through to the following Summer. I'm like alot of people. Even when there is ample sun, as an office worker, I just don't always get sun consistently.

But what I find disturbing is the now usual HYPE that surrounds something many of us knew and understood for a very long time. Advising that folks not take a Vaccine but simply boost vitamin D is in my mind an abysmal misuse of science in a political game of paranoia and fear that radical groups, right or left - it does not matter, often deploy to convince folks that we are always being lied to by the government or science or anyone who has a perceived agenda or axe to grind with society.

Whatever...

If one wants to get sucked into bogus conclusions regarding a simple thing of making sure one has enough vitamin D, into a conspiracy of some sort.... well how can I/we convince folks they are on the wrong track? The point is, and I've have daily dealings with Leftist and Rightist who are all to quite to get quite angry about the "way things are", that there is little one can say to folks who "believe" in something to a point of being an Evangelist for an idea or cause. (I know because I myself have fallen into this type of mental trap.)

Making Vitamin D deficiency into a Political Rallying cry is a strange twist for a very straightforward thing.

I believe that I've been increasingly deficient over the years, especially in the winter months. I've definitely been having increasingly difficult issues with SAD or what I thought was SAD over the winter months. I even bought one of those lights. And one year I tried Zoloft.

Last year, I increased my Vitamine D supplementation. I did much better. What I should have done is gotten tested to really see if in fact was an issue.

I will on my next blood draw, ask for a test for measuring Vitamin D level. The new evidence showing that this is a problem for us medicated pozzers would seem to indicate this is prudent!

It certainly isn't going to be a "magic" bullet and cure HIV, although it won't be long before we start seeing stuff that will make those claims, no doubt!

risred1 - hiv +
02/07 CD4 404 - 27% - VL 15k
10/07 CD4 484 - 31% - VL 45k
05/08 CD4 414 - 26% - VL 70k
01/09 CD4 365 - 23% - VL 65k
05/09 CD4 291 - 23% - VL 115k - Started Meds - Reyataz/Truvada
06/09 CD4 394 - ?% - VL 1200 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
07/09 CD4 441 - ?% - VL 118 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
09/09 CD4 375 - ?% - VL Undetectable - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
12/09 CD4 595 - ?% - VL Undetectable - VIT D 34 - Reyataz/Truvada/Norvir

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #59 on: November 17, 2009, 06:01:49 AM »

risred1,

I'm glad to see that you are going to get your vitamin d levels tested --- thats a good decision.

Vitamin D has been having a lot of press and hype lately because the medical world has found that vitamin D influences many parts of your body. It's not just for "rickets" anymore.  Will all the conclusions pan out --- of course not-- but it is important to find out which conclusions are real and which are bogus. Evidently the mainstream medical world takes the initial findings serious enough to step up research into this hormone---- yes --vitamin d is a hormone so the word vitamin is really a misnomer. There are over 800 clinical trials being done on vitamin D for various indications  (including flu) so we will know soon what is truth and what is hype:

http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=vitamin+D

v

Offline risred1

  • Member
  • Posts: 419
  • My Source for Supps - www.newyorkbuyersclub.org
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #60 on: November 17, 2009, 08:52:39 AM »
That's all well and good!! And I mean that seriously.

Studies are of course important... But we also know that studies can be conflicting, highly variable, investigating one thing when we really want a different view, etc.

Remember when Eggs were "bad" for you and Margarine was "good"....

We should all be aware that we need Vitamin D, and that it has a vital roll to play in our health, and specifically, in our Bone Health.

However, when I see the blatant Hype and even Political Agenda's being attached to Vitamin D, just like other substances like Resveratrol, and the list goes on, there are aspects of the Supp of the Day....

How many supplements have we seen come and go in and out of favor? I would just suggest that we Get our D levels Checked, Take corrective action, which means some should not be taking D. (Not everyone is in deficit and Vitamin D can have toxic effects if you get too much as we have witnessed on the board.)

And then we go on. Because, its just a supplement we need or not.



risred1 - hiv +
02/07 CD4 404 - 27% - VL 15k
10/07 CD4 484 - 31% - VL 45k
05/08 CD4 414 - 26% - VL 70k
01/09 CD4 365 - 23% - VL 65k
05/09 CD4 291 - 23% - VL 115k - Started Meds - Reyataz/Truvada
06/09 CD4 394 - ?% - VL 1200 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
07/09 CD4 441 - ?% - VL 118 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
09/09 CD4 375 - ?% - VL Undetectable - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
12/09 CD4 595 - ?% - VL Undetectable - VIT D 34 - Reyataz/Truvada/Norvir

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #61 on: November 17, 2009, 10:14:23 AM »

risred1,

See attached for what we do know so far from the Mayo-Clinic:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vitamin-d/NS_patient-vitamind/DSECTION=evidence

Of course review with your dr. if you have any of these conditions.

v
ps:  Key to grades
A Strong scientific evidence for this use
B Good scientific evidence for this use
C Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D Fair scientific evidence against this use (it may not work)
F Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likely does not work)

Offline risred1

  • Member
  • Posts: 419
  • My Source for Supps - www.newyorkbuyersclub.org
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #62 on: November 17, 2009, 09:47:28 PM »
These are pretty much in line with my understanding, which is cool.

I think its safe to say that HIV Positive people need to have D levels checked, and take corrective action. And that adjusting your D levels before conditions manifest themselves is prudent.

I am personally already taking about 2900 units a day. 2500 from a D-3 Supplement, and 400 from the Multi I take. I will diminish consumption during summer months when I'm outdoors more.

One might think that one can overdue Vitamin D from Sun, but the body has protective mechanisms that keeps D in check.

My doc said i was way out in front of the D curve as far as he was concerned. And it was because of my Winter Blahs/Blues/SAD. So far so good this year. The change to Standard time used to really really bother me. I notice it, but I'm not bothered by it. One job I nearly lost my mind when they moved us into the basement without any windows. But that was before I made a connection to my mood during the dark winter months. (I also changed jobs quite a bit back then.)

I'm a Vit D supporter, but hopefully not a Vit D hype machine.

Over the years on this board there have been many a battle fought over the value of supplements. Many of us have our beliefs based upon scant/minimal or anecdotal evidence.

However, being right about keeping a closer view of Vit D levels, doesn't completely exonerate our penchant for supplements. But it also shows those who profess that one is merely pissing away money, may be a bit short sited in some regards. Especially for those of us who are using supps in a prophylactic manner.

But be it discussions about food or supplements or whatever, having an open mind doesn't mean falling for the internet HYPE machine regarding the supplement of the day. Hopefully at some point we can do things that make sense, at least is some rationalized process.

I don't know if its important really to be "right" or vindicated any more. I'm a HIV positive person on meds. The meds are doing their job. I'm hoping that the anti inflammatory effects of some of my supps are actually doing something. That's where guessing and hope begin on much of this stuff.

Confused? I think we all should be a bit, and our righteousness be measured.






risred1 - hiv +
02/07 CD4 404 - 27% - VL 15k
10/07 CD4 484 - 31% - VL 45k
05/08 CD4 414 - 26% - VL 70k
01/09 CD4 365 - 23% - VL 65k
05/09 CD4 291 - 23% - VL 115k - Started Meds - Reyataz/Truvada
06/09 CD4 394 - ?% - VL 1200 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
07/09 CD4 441 - ?% - VL 118 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
09/09 CD4 375 - ?% - VL Undetectable - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
12/09 CD4 595 - ?% - VL Undetectable - VIT D 34 - Reyataz/Truvada/Norvir

Offline BM

  • Member
  • Posts: 340
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #63 on: November 21, 2009, 02:36:55 PM »
I read an article (or paper abstract) about the benefits of vitamin D for inflammation and now I can't find it! I'm not sure if it concerned the general population or HIV population. It was from a respectable source. My consultant would like to read it if anyone can point me in the right direction.

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #64 on: November 22, 2009, 06:02:27 AM »

BM,

Here is one article pertaining to vitamin d and inflammation:

http://www.newsmax.com/health/D_deficiency_inflammation/2009/04/09/201405.html

Here is another:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090408140208.htm

Vitamin d deficiency is certainly a problem in those with chronic illness. Everyone should get their vitamin d checked.

Hope this helps.

v

Online Miss Philicia

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  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #65 on: November 22, 2009, 08:31:23 AM »
Newsmax?  Home of Dick Morris, Frank Gaffney and David Limbaugh, and founded by Christopher Ruddy:

source

Quote
Ruddy is one of (and perhaps the most prominent among) several individuals who have discussed questions regarding the death of White House counsel Vince Foster, work which was described by Former FBI Director William S. Sessions as "serious and compelling."[13]
New York Post editor Eric Breindel recommended Ruddy for a job at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review owned by Richard Mellon Scaife.[14] In November 1994, Ruddy was hired to investigate the story full-time by the Tribune-Review.[15] In between Ruddy's departure from the Post and joining the Tribune-Review, he put out a report through the Western Journalism Center criticizing the Fiske investigation as inadequate. With the help of Scaife, the Center took out full-page ads in major newspapers to promote the report (Scaife gave $330,000 to the Center in 1994-95 before ending his support).[16][17]
Ruddy claimed that Park Police had staged the scene of Foster's death as described in their reports.[18] One of the officers named by Ruddy sued him along with the Western Journalism Center, seeking $2 million in damages for libel.[19] The suit was dismissed because Ruddy had said nothing libelous "of and concerning the officer".[20]
Ruddy later built on his work on the Foster case for his book The Strange Death of Vincent Foster. In reviewing the book, Richard Brookhiser of the National Review called it "the St. Mark version of the gospel of the Foster cover-up: a plain narrative of the perceived failings of the official investigation, with minimal speculation."[21] Shortly after the book came out, Fiske's successor as independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, released his report from the third investigation into Foster's death. Starr also concluded that Foster had committed suicide

Oh, and then there's that little tid bit about Newsmax advocating a violet overthrow of the Obama administration:

http://mediamatters.org/blog/200909290042
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #66 on: November 22, 2009, 09:19:27 AM »

LOL

I guess Science Daily must have picked it up from them too!

One can be judgemental of the source, however,not necessarily of  the information being discerned after further research which your statement is obviously lacking.

By the way didn't your buddy Jan tell you not to respond to my posts?

v

Online Miss Philicia

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  • Posts: 23,900
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #67 on: November 22, 2009, 10:08:44 AM »

By the way didn't your buddy Jan tell you not to respond to my posts?

v

No, Jan told you not to be such a paranoid person.   Any more lies to tell us all here on AIDSmeds?
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Online Miss Philicia

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  • Posts: 23,900
  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #68 on: November 22, 2009, 10:27:45 AM »
LOL

I guess Science Daily must have picked it up from them too!

One can be judgemental of the source, however,not necessarily of  the information being discerned after further research which your statement is obviously lacking.

By the way didn't your buddy Jan tell you not to respond to my posts?

v

Yeah, like your conspiracy theorist link to prisonplanet a month ago that everyone on the board told you was full of BS.  Let me refresh your mind:

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=26322.msg361583#msg361583

And for our fair board members that lack knowledge of veritas political affiliations please take to time to read that web site:

http://www.prisonplanet.com/

Obama = World Government = Fall of the Republic and all Civilization as we know it.

Way to go, dearie!

Fall Of The Republic + The Obama Deception + Free Reflections & WarningsBuy Alex's new film Fall Of The Republic:The Presidency Of Barack H Obama and get The Obama Deception for $9.95 and receive Reflections & Warnings:An Interview with Aaron Russo free! This is an amazing deal and won't last long. You save $29.95!

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SP-FOTRTODRW-1Regular price: $59.85Sale price: $29.90
« Last Edit: November 22, 2009, 10:32:37 AM by Miss Philicia »
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #69 on: November 22, 2009, 10:48:37 AM »
 I understand lack of research skills can be frustrating, thus resorting to emotional barbs, but try to stay on topic ------ Vitamin D.

Thanks

v

Online Miss Philicia

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  • celebrity poster, faker & poser
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #70 on: November 22, 2009, 05:19:45 PM »
Your "links" speak volumes.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #71 on: November 23, 2009, 05:20:07 AM »


Childish taunts due to insecurity speaks volumes.

You still haven't provided any research on vitamin D that negates what was said in any of my "links", thus proving  lack of research skills.

 However, I understand your need for attention based on a cursory glance at some of your 10,000 posts. So why not grow up a little bit and put the childish antics away. You have something to contirbute here due to your LTS status, so why not do it maturely.

v

Offline BM

  • Member
  • Posts: 340
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2009, 05:43:33 AM »
Can stick my neck out and suggest we draw a line under this so we can get back on-topic? Please?

Offline veritas

  • Member
  • Posts: 1,408
Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #73 on: November 23, 2009, 06:10:19 AM »

BM,

I don't know if any of the links proviided was the one you were looking for (probably not) however the science is credible in both articles. Here is a link to google search for vitamin d in 2009 which shows close to 2 million hits:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4ADBR_enUS308US309&q=vitamin+d+and+inflammation+2009&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&aqi=

To find that one particular article will be difficult unless you can provide more info to narrow down the search.   Bottom line --VITAMINE D --- Good.

v

Online Miss Philicia

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #74 on: November 23, 2009, 07:21:50 AM »

However, I understand your need for attention based on a cursory glance at some of your 10,000 posts.

As opposed to your gratuitous bumping up of our "Holy Grail" thread going on now sixteen months (dare I say a record) -- you often post repeatedly with absolutely no replies.  In fact, just the other day you did it four times.  Talk about a brick wall.  745 posts, all in about 3 different threads.

Oh right, you're a LTS yourself (or so you say) yet you never contribute in that forum.  Now that's fascinating.

As far as "insecurity" goes, that's about the last personality trait I'm ever accused of.  I believe that's called psychological projection, and the Mental Health section is over in another part of the forums.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 07:25:00 AM by Miss Philicia »
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Offline Ann

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #75 on: November 23, 2009, 07:42:57 AM »
Miss P, Veritas, this silly back-and-forth-about-nothing-to-do-with-vitamin-D hijack stops right here, right now. Further posts of this nature in this thread will result in time outs. This is a serious warning to both of you. I don't care who started it or whatever, it stops NOW.

Ann
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Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #76 on: December 04, 2009, 09:37:19 PM »
FYI, I borrowed the recent book "The Vitamin D revolution" from the library yesterday.
http://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-Revolution-Power-Amazing-Change/dp/1401924700/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259979716&sr=8-1

I read it all in one shot this afternoon (ah, the joy of not working!).

It's a very interesting read, though a bit repetitive. While there is no research about HIV/AIDS and vitamin D cited, there is quite a bit about many other diseases. The doctor states about 75% of people are deficient nowadays and almost no one who lives north of the 35th parallel can get any vitamin D from the sun in the winter.

He recommends everyone gets their blood level checked.

Here is a fairly interest chart :
http://vitamindrevolution.com/images/disease_incidence_prev_chart_101608.pdf

For those who can't afford the blood tests, he recommends 2000 IU D3 daily supplementation for every adult as safe and beneficial. He says to avoid D2 as it is not the human form.

For those who can afford tests, he usually prescribes more, up to 8,000 IU/day - the tests are there to make sure an excessive level doesn't build up.

He shoots for a level of 40 - 70ng/ml in his patients. The current generally recognized "normal" level is 30 ng/ml.

He is not alone in shooting for much higher than the current "normal" level of 30.

See http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2009/11/what-is-healthy-vitamin-d-blood-level.html . This doctor recommends 60 to 70ng/ml. It's fairly hard to stay in that narrow of a range, though.

My last level was 44 and I was supplementing 5800 IU/day, in the summer, when levels should be highest ! I'm going to about 9000 IU/day this winter. I picked up a bottle of 600 softgels of 2000 IU for $13.99 at Costco yesterday.

I hope we will see more research about vitamin D in PWHA, but in the meantime, there doesn't seem to be much downside to starting some now.

Some interesting links I found from scholar.google.com :

http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10.1089/aid.2008.0183
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/605699
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121388522/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/123/1/e121
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 10:05:27 PM by madbrain »

Online Miss Philicia

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #77 on: December 04, 2009, 10:14:09 PM »
Yeah, I just had mine checked and ***surprise*** it came back within range.  I've been taking a supplement daily, plus my multi-vitamin, now for around three years.  Previous to that I was always taking just what Vit D came in my multi-vitamin, but I took that daily for the previous 13 years.  I get next to no sunlight either even in the summer.  I've also probably been on tenofovir for around 8 years.
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Offline BM

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #78 on: December 29, 2009, 08:48:04 PM »
Is it better to space the large doses we're discussing throughout the day, or does it make no difference?

BM (who, up until now, has been taking his 4,800 IU with lunch)

Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #79 on: December 30, 2009, 05:01:43 AM »
Is it better to space the large doses we're discussing throughout the day, or does it make no difference?

BM (who, up until now, has been taking his 4,800 IU with lunch)

In theory it makes no difference because vitamin D is fat soluble. It can accumulate in the body for days.
In practice, I had high levels taking 4800 IU last year in two divided doses, than I did this year with 5000 IU all at once. But this is just my personal experience.

Offline YaKaMein

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #80 on: January 02, 2010, 07:39:45 PM »
Discovered I was Vit-D deficient with labs this past summer. Began mega treatment of 50K units for 8 wks. Brought me up from 11 to 32. Am doing another tx dose of 50K for 6 weeks. Will retest in March to see if higher in normal range. Will repeat DEXA to see if my score improves and the osteoporosis improves. Will start back on my 2000units of Vit-D and 1200 Calcium daily.

Funny thing I noticed: I have a weird aftertaste [bitter] when I eat carbs, everything else tastes fine, just carbs of any kind. It went away a few days after treatment was finished. Go figure this is a new way to avoid cookies!

09/11 Endocrine Consult
08/11 CD4 328 14.9% VL 0
 Disc'd Bactrim DEXA -3.1 Tscore
03/11 CD4 338 14.7% VL 0
11/10 CD4 300 14.3% VL 0 <20copies
07/10 CD4 336 14.0% VL 0 DEXA -2.7 Tscore
03/10 CD4 308 13.4% VL 0 Vit D normal
01/10 Began FOTO
11/09 CD4 274 13.7% VL 0 Chol 173 Trig 131
07/09 CD4 324 13.5% VL 0 DEXA -3.1 Tscore lumbar
03/09 CD4 207 10.9% VL 0
11/08 CD4 227 10.3% VL 0 Chol 176 Trig 156
04/08 CD4 228 9.5% VL 0
01/08 CD4 194 9.0% VL 0
09/07 CD4 176 8.3% VL 0
03/07 CD4 130 9.5% VL 0 Chol 261  Trig 227
12/06 CD4 109 6.4% VL 0
09/06 CD4  88 5.5% VL und desens'd rtd to Bactrim
08/06  Began Atripla
07/06 CD4  59 5.0% VL 145 Chol 117 Trig 104
06/06  Bactrim rash, X2 Dapsone
 EFV & Truvada Chol 128 Trig 131
05/06 CD4  6 (2.0%) VL 78667 only V179D mutation Dx PC MAC

Offline BM

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #81 on: January 19, 2010, 05:44:46 PM »
My blood pressure has dropped while I've been taking vitamin D; I assume it's due to the vitamin D as nothing else has changed. Before I started, my blood pressure was consistently around 137/73. Last week it was 116/67.

Is vitamin D known to have this effect?

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #82 on: January 19, 2010, 05:54:45 PM »

BM,

It certainly can. See this:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vitamin-d/NS_patient-vitamind

"The major biologic function of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. Recently, research also suggests vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), cancer, and several autoimmune diseases."

v

Offline tommy246

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #83 on: January 20, 2010, 07:12:24 AM »
I would just like to add that the well respected hiv specialist dr gallant from johns hopkins website highly reccomends that all hiv pos persons regardless of calcuium / vit D levels should take calcium /vit D supplements as hiv reduces bone density long term and hiv meds also do so but only initially. My levels are normal and i take no supplements apart from omega 3 , and eat a good meditterenean diet  but i am going to start vit d / calcium supplements as soon as i clear it  with my doctor on my next visit.
This supplement thing is a very personal thing but thats my take on it.
jan 06 neg
dec 08 pos cd4 505 ,16%, 1,500vl
april 09 cd4 635 ,16%,60,000
july 09 ,cd4 545,17%,80,000
aug 09,hosptal 18days pneumonia cd190,225,000,15%
1 week later cd4 415 20%
nov 09 cd4 591 ,vl 59,000,14%,started atripla
dec 09  cd4 787, vl 266, 16%
march 2010  cd4 720 vl non detectable -20  20%
june 2010  cd4  680, 21%, ND

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #84 on: January 20, 2010, 08:27:38 AM »

Tommy,

Good  decision!

v

Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #85 on: January 22, 2010, 11:49:46 AM »
I would just like to add that the well respected hiv specialist dr gallant from johns hopkins website highly reccomends that all hiv pos persons regardless of calcuium / vit D levels should take calcium /vit D supplements as hiv reduces bone density long term and hiv meds also do so but only initially. My levels are normal and i take no supplements apart from omega 3 , and eat a good meditterenean diet  but i am going to start vit d / calcium supplements as soon as i clear it  with my doctor on my next visit.
This supplement thing is a very personal thing but thats my take on it.

Could you please provide a quote/link to his recommendation ?
There have been some misattributions to him before. Not questioning that this is true in this case, but it would be nice to read the specific advice.

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #86 on: January 28, 2010, 02:28:53 PM »

Another reason to take Vitamin D:

http://www.natap.org/2010/HIV/012810_02.htm

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #87 on: February 02, 2010, 01:21:21 PM »
New York Times

FEBRUARY 1, 2010, 4:42 PM
The Miracle of Vitamin D: Sound Science, or Hype?

By TARA PARKER-POPE

Imagine a treatment that could build bones, strengthen the immune system and lower the risks of illnesses like diabetes, heart and kidney disease, high blood pressure and cancer.

Some research suggests that such a wonder treatment already exists. Itís vitamin D, a nutrient that the body makes from sunlight and that is also found in fish and fortified milk.

Yet despite the health potential of vitamin D, as many as half of all adults and children are said to have less than optimum levels and as many as 10 percent of children are highly deficient, according to a 2008 report in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

As a result, doctors are increasingly testing their patientsí vitamin D levels and prescribing daily supplements to raise them. According to the lab company Quest Diagnostics, orders for vitamin D tests surged more than 50 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009, up from the same quarter a year earlier. And in 2008, consumers bought $235 million worth of vitamin D supplements, up from $40 million in 2001, according to Nutrition Business Journal.

But donít start gobbling down vitamin D supplements just yet. The excitement about their health potential is still far ahead of the science.

Although numerous studies have been promising, there are scant data from randomized clinical trials. Little is known about what the ideal level of vitamin D really is, whether raising it can improve health, and what potential side effects are caused by high doses.

And since most of the data on vitamin D comes from observational research, it may be that high doses of the nutrient donít really make people healthier, but that healthy people simply do the sorts of things that happen to raise vitamin D.

ďCorrelation does not necessarily mean a cause-and-effect relationship,Ē said Dr. JoAnn E. Manson, a Harvard professor who is chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Womenís Hospital in Boston.

ďPeople may have high vitamin D levels because they exercise a lot and are getting ultraviolet-light exposure from exercising outdoors,Ē Dr. Manson said. ďOr they may have high vitamin D because they are health-conscious and take supplements. But they also have a healthy diet, donít smoke and do a lot of the other things that keep you healthy.Ē

Dr. Manson is leading a major study over the next five years that should provide answers to these questions and more. The nationwide clinical trial is recruiting 20,000 older adults, including men 60 and older and women 65 and older, to study whether high doses of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids from fish-oil supplements will lower risk for heart disease and cancer. (Learn about taking part in the study at www.vitalstudy.org.)

Dr. Manson said fish-oil supplements were included in the study because they are another promising treatment that suffers from a dearth of clinical trial evidence. In addition, both vitamin D and fish oil are known to have an anti-inflammatory effect, but each works through a different pathway in the body, so there may be an added health benefit in combining them.

Study participants will be divided into four groups. One will take both vitamin D and fish oil pills. Two will take either a vitamin D or a fish-oil supplement and a placebo. The fourth will take two placebo pills.

Vitamin D is found throughout the body and acts as a signaling mechanism to turn cells on and off. Right now, the recommended dose from food and supplements is about 400 international units a day for most people, but most experts agree that is probably too low. The Institute of Medicine is reviewing guidelines for vitamin D and is expected to raise the recommended daily dose.

Study participants will take 2,000 I.U.ís of vitamin D3, believed to be the form most easily used by the body. The study will use one-gram supplements of omega-3 fish oil, about 5 to 10 times the average daily intake.

The vitamin D dose is far higher than what has been used in other studies. The well-known Womenís Health Initiative study, for instance, tracked women taking 400 units of vitamin D and 1,000 milligrams of calcium. The study found no overall benefit from the supplements, although women who consistently took their pills had a lower risk of hip fracture. Even so, many experts think 400 units is far too low for any additional health benefits.

Another study, of 1,200 women, looked at the effects of 1,500 milligrams of calcium and 1,000 units of vitamin D. Women who took both supplements showed a lower risk for breast cancer over the next four years, but the numbers of actual cases ó seven breast cancers in the placebo group and four in the supplement group ó were too small to draw meaningful conclusions.

Although consumers may be tempted to rush out and start taking 2,000 I.U.ís of vitamin D a day, doctors warn against it. Several recent studies of nutrients, including vitamins E and B, selenium and beta carotene, have proved disappointing ó even suggesting that high doses do more harm than good, increasing risk for heart problems, diabetes and cancer, depending on the supplement.

Despite the promise of vitamin D in observational studies, research into other supplements shows itís difficult to document a benefit in otherwise healthy people, and virtually impossible to predict potential harms, notes Dr. Eric A. Klein, chairman of the Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Klein recently worked as national coordinator for Select, a study of vitamin E and selenium for prostate cancer. The study seemed promising, but in the end it showed no benefit from the supplements and a potentially higher risk for diabetes in selenium users.

ďMy sentiment is that the lesson we have learned form large trials with other vitamin supplements, including Select, is that there is no proven health or preventative benefit for dietary supplements in nutritionally replete populations, which accounts for most of the people who enter this sort of clinical trial,Ē Dr. Klein said. ďIt makes more sense to me to study dietary supplements or vitamins in populations who are deficient.Ē

People most at risk for vitamin D deficiency are older, have diabetes or kidney disease, stay indoors or have darker skin. African-American teenagers are at particularly high risk, possibly because in addition to their dark skin, they are less likely at that age to drink milk or play outside.

The scientific community continues to debate the optimum level of vitamin D. In general, people are considered to be deficient if they have blood levels below 15 or 20 nanograms per milliliter. But many doctors now believe vitamin D levels should be above 30. The ideal level isnít known, nor is it known at what point a person is getting too much vitamin D, which can lead to kidney stones, calcification in blood vessels and other problems.

Peopleís vitamin D levels are influenced by whether they have light or dark skin, where they live, how much time they spend outdoors and by fish and milk consumption. To raise vitamin D without supplements, a person could increase sun exposure for 10 to 15 minutes a day. Eating more fish can help ó a 3.5-ounce serving of wild fresh salmon has 600 to 1,000 I.U.ís of vitamin D ó but it would take a quart of milk a day to get the recommended dose of vitamin D.

ďWhat we know is that there are a lot of people who are vitamin D deficient based on estimates from national surveys,Ē said Dr. Michal L. Melamed, assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. ďBut we donít know what happens when the curve shifts to the other end. There probably is a risk to having too much vitamin D in the system.Ē
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #88 on: February 02, 2010, 01:42:33 PM »

Certainly, a cautiously written article, proving that a dificiency will cause you harm but at this time it is unknown what the optimum level is.  I guess that is why there are over 150 clinical trials in process right now to try to determine that optimal level.

 Another reason to get your "D" levels checked and supplement if you are insufficient.

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #89 on: February 02, 2010, 01:49:06 PM »
And of course none of these are studying the HIV angle much less the viread one, but I just had my levels checked and they are fine, but then I've been taking 2000 or more I.U. of it now for three years.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Offline GNYC09

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Re: Vitamin D - It gets T cells going
« Reply #90 on: March 10, 2010, 07:35:14 PM »
Another reason vitamin D is important: It gets T cells going


Here is a snippet from the interesting Scientific American article:
"A new discovery demonstrates how the vitamin plays a major role in keeping the body healthy in the first place, by allowing the immune system's T cells to start doing their jobs. 

In order for T cells to become active members of the body's immune system, they must transition from so-called "naive" T cells into either killer cells or helper cells (which are charged with "remembering" specific invaders). And, if ample vitamin D is not around, the T cells do not make that crucial transition, a group of researchers led by Carsten Geisler, head of the Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, found. They draw this conclusion based on their experiments with isolated naÔve human T cells."

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #91 on: March 11, 2010, 05:45:34 AM »

GNYC09,

NICE find !!!!

v

Offline J.R.E.

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #92 on: March 11, 2010, 09:08:41 AM »


Just swallowed another 50,000 IU yesterday !  ( once a month thing)


Ray
Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 12.5mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
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http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


 In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started my first  HAART regimen  on October 24th,03.

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Offline GNYC09

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #93 on: March 13, 2010, 10:52:02 PM »
GNYC09,

NICE find !!!!

v

Thanks - I was really glad to see this new info about Vitamin D and T Cells because it's something we can easily add to our diets to help our counts...

Offline veritas

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #94 on: March 30, 2010, 06:00:27 AM »

Another vit d trial to start:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125226703&sc=17&f=1001


"large-scale, randomized clinical trials showing benefits in terms of prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, cognitive decline, depression, autoimmune disease,"

These findings will certainly be interesting.

v


Offline tokyodecadence

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #95 on: March 30, 2010, 07:31:59 AM »
My doctor had me go on a regimen of vitamin D that was a once a week pill, I forget the dosage, for about 12 weeks. Now I'm soon to start a daily vitamin D supplement. Although there was this weird mix up with my insurance when the company I worked for decided to go private with their insurance claims, instead of using an outside company, and I have only been getting my meds. So I may have to go back on the weekly supplement if my vitamin D numbers dip below 30 again. She recommends it for everyone who is Positive here, because of the lack of direct sunlight year-round in the PNW, and especially for people with darker skin tones. Thatsa me!
[.Fod„o.]

Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #96 on: March 30, 2010, 08:12:38 PM »
My doctor had me go on a regimen of vitamin D that was a once a week pill, I forget the dosage, for about 12 weeks. Now I'm soon to start a daily vitamin D supplement. Although there was this weird mix up with my insurance when the company I worked for decided to go private with their insurance claims, instead of using an outside company, and I have only been getting my meds. So I may have to go back on the weekly supplement if my vitamin D numbers dip below 30 again. She recommends it for everyone who is Positive here, because of the lack of direct sunlight year-round in the PNW, and especially for people with darker skin tones. Thatsa me!

30 (ng/ml) is the minimum considered to be non-deficient. You can shoot for a bit more. How many IU is your daily supplement ?

Offline fearless

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #97 on: April 01, 2010, 01:51:25 AM »
I had mince checked the other day. I'll have to double check this but I'm sure the doc said my result came back as 140 or thereabouts.
No supplements, no nothing, other than good ol' australian sunshine.
He said the results were great. but maybe we use a different unit of measurement, like we do for cholesterol levels, so i might not be able to do a comparison with you guys.
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Offline madbrain

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #98 on: April 01, 2010, 01:45:59 PM »
I had mince checked the other day. I'll have to double check this but I'm sure the doc said my result came back as 140 or thereabouts.
No supplements, no nothing, other than good ol' australian sunshine.
He said the results were great. but maybe we use a different unit of measurement, like we do for cholesterol levels, so i might not be able to do a comparison with you guys.

Yes. There are also units of nmol/l which are 2.5 times the ng/ml . So your level would be 56 ng/ml which is indeed great.

Offline John2038

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Re: Vitamin D
« Reply #99 on: April 17, 2010, 04:12:56 PM »
Reading this thread, some people are talking in ng/ml (american I guess), and others in nmol/L.

When no unit is mentioned, this can be confusing.

Convertions
ng/ml to nmol/L : multiply the nl/mg by 2.496
nmol/L to ng/ml : divide  the nmol/L  by 2.496

As far I am concerned, the recommendations are as follow for the 25-OH-Vitamin-D (D3) (*):

minimal recommended threshold: 50 nmol/L (20 ng/ml)
therapeutical range: 75-140 nmol/L  (30 - 56 ng/ml)

(*) accordingly to the  13th Workshop consencus for Vitamin D nutritional guidelines. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007; 103 : 204-5

Notes:

SystŤme International (SI) Conversion Factors for Selected Laboratory Components

 


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