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Author Topic: Milk and Moxifloxacin  (Read 5143 times)

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Offline Brian360

  • Member
  • Posts: 47
  • Just livin' it up until the sun goes down.
Milk and Moxifloxacin
« on: August 03, 2006, 11:07:06 AM »
My doctor just sent a perscription for a new medication that you cannot take with dairy products.  This really ticks me off because although I am for the most part lactose intolerant, I use milk products in my digestion.  Think of how many different food products use dairy products - milk, cheese, yoghurt, lasagna, biscuits - just to name a few.   I had planned very soon to make chicken cordon blue for my family - no, can't do that. If I start taking this.  Her and I are going to have some words when she calls!!!
July06: Tcells 0, VL >+750,000
Aug06: TCells 22, VL 214,000
Sep06: TCells 32, VL 34,500
Oct06: TCells 92, VL 9,560
Dec06: Tcells 27, VL 25,000
Jan07: Tcells 43, VL - un-detect
Jan10: TCells 111 - popped to 160 fall 09, VL  undectable since Oct. 07

Offline alisenjafi

  • Member
  • Posts: 811
  • They say HIV comes from monkeys!
Re: Milk and Moxifloxacin
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2006, 11:42:10 AM »
I don't know much about moxifloxacin so when I looked it up:
http://health.yahoo.com/drug/d04500a1
 Since your not going to be on this for life I don't think it is the end of the world.

What is the most important information I should know about moxifloxacin?

 Take this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Moxifloxacin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.
 Do not use moxifloxacin without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use moxifloxacin if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others.

Certain other drugs can make moxifloxacin less effective when taken at the same time. The following medicines should be taken at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you take moxifloxacin: antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others).

 Moxifloxacin may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds, and wear protective clothing and sunscreen when you are outdoors. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun.

What is moxifloxacin?

Moxifloxacin is an antibiotic in the class of drugs called fluoroquinolones. It fights bacteria in the body.

Moxifloxacin is used to treat bacterial infections.

Moxifloxacin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


Who should not take moxifloxacin?

 Do not use moxifloxacin without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use moxifloxacin if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others.

Before taking moxifloxacin, tell your doctor if you:

have ever had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic;
use a diuretic medicine (water pill);
have a low level of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia);
have heart or liver disease; or
have epilepsy or another seizure disorder.
You may not be able to use moxifloxacin or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if any of these conditions affects you.

 Moxifloxacin is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether moxifloxacin will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use moxifloxacin without telling your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.
 Moxifloxacin may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
 Moxifloxacin should not be used by children younger than 18 years of age.
How should I take moxifloxacin?

Moxifloxacin should be used exactly as your doctor has prescribed it for you. Do not use more of the medication than recommended. Do not take moxifloxacin for longer than your doctor has prescribed.

 Take each oral dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water. Drink plenty of fluid while taking moxifloxacin.
 Take this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Moxifloxacin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Moxifloxacin is sometimes given as an intravenous (IV) infusion through a needle placed in one of your veins. Moxifloxacin IV is given slowly over a period of one hour.

 Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

It is best to take each dose of moxifloxacin at the same time each day.


What happens if I overdose?

 Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a moxifloxacin overdose may include extreme sleepiness, seizures, tremors, vomiting or diarrhea.


What should I avoid while taking moxifloxacin?

 Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Moxifloxacin may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen if you must be out in the sun while using moxifloxacin. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun.
 Moxifloxacin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. If this happens, avoid driving or doing anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

What are the possible side effects of moxifloxacin?

 Stop using moxifloxacin and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

rapid or pounding heartbeat;
diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
hallucinations, depression, thoughts of suicide;
fainting or seizure (convulsions);
liver damage (yellowing of the skin or eyes, sudden stomach pain, severe fatigue); or
sudden pain or swelling near your joints (especially in your arm or ankle).
Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Talk with your doctor if you have any of these side effects:

mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain;
dizziness, confusion; or
nervousness, anxiety, sleep problems.
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

If you have diarrhea while using moxifloxacin, call your doctor before using any medicine to stop the diarrhea, especially if it is watery or contains blood.


What other drugs will affect moxifloxacin?

 Do not use moxifloxacin without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use moxifloxacin if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others.

Certain other drugs can make moxifloxacin less effective when taken at the same time. The following medicines should be taken at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you take moxifloxacin: antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others).

 Before using moxifloxacin tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

a tricyclic antidepressant such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), amoxapine (Asendin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), doxepin (Sinequan);
erythromycin (E-Mycin, Ery-Tab, E.E.S.); or
cisapride (Propulsid).
You may not be able to use moxifloxacin, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are using any of the medicines listed above.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect moxifloxacin. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.


Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist has additional information about moxifloxacin written for health professionals that you may read.


What does my medication look like?

Moxifloxacin is available with a prescription under the brand name Avelox. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

Avelox 400 mg-red, oblong tablets


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are using, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2003 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.03. Revision date: 12/30/05.

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