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Alpha Lipoic Acid for Neuropathy???

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blondbeauty:
I found this article from the Mayo Clinic. It is about diabetic neuropathy and alpha lipoic acid. Maybe it could be applied to hiv neuropathy...what do you think?
http://www.mayoclinic.org/news2003-rst/1733.html

T79:
Hi check this out.

http://www.tinm.org/Executive%20Summary%20Gates-1.pdf

http://www.tinm.org/ClinicalResults.pdf

J.R.E.:
Hello,

 I've been using ALA for quite a while, and I certainly believe that it helped me with the neuropathy. However within the last 6 months or so, it seems to be creeping up on me again.

Did you check out this thread :

 http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=1729.0 Within that thread is probably another link about ALA, so click on that also.



Take care-----Ray

ZCorker:
  Alpha Lipoic Acid is supposed to be good for blood sugar problems, but I am not sure if it helps hiv related neuropathy.   The drug D4T causes nerves to physically separate from muscle tissue causing a permanent loss of sensation and eventually mobility problems.  DDI and 3TC due this as well.

  Below is an article about research at John Hopkins.  The article has demonstrated that nerves can be regenerated and as a result, this article has nothing less than profound implications for hiv patients.

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0606210157jun21,1,802485.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed&ctrack=1&cset=true

From Chicago News Tribune



Stem cells, chemicals used to help repair paralysis in rats

Published June 21, 2006

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Scientists have used stem cells and nerve-friendly chemicals to regrow the circuitry needed to move a muscle, helping partially paralyzed rats walk.

Years of additional research is needed before such an experiment could be attempted in people.

But the work marks a new step in stem cell research that promises to one day help repair damage from nerve-destroying illnesses such as Lou Gehrig's disease, or from spinal cord injuries.

"This is an important first step, but it really is a first step, a proof of principle that ... you can rewire part of the nervous system," said Dr. Douglas Kerr, a neurologist at Johns Hopkins University who led the work being published Monday in the journal Annals of Neurology.

The new research details a complex recipe of growth factors and other chemicals that entice the delicate cells to form correctly and make the right connections.

The experiment essentially replaces motor neurons--specialized nerve cells for movement--that have died to make a new circuit that grows neuronal connections out of the spinal cord and down to a leg muscle

jack:
took this for over a year. I have no idea if it does or did anything. The only good thing about it is its cheap.

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