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Author Topic: The art of healthful eating  (Read 13229 times)

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Offline aztecan

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The art of healthful eating
« on: June 25, 2008, 11:19:55 AM »
When discussing nutrition, people usually bring up supplements, vitamins and herbs.

But, there are times I think we are missing the point.

Nutrition isn't about what pills to pop, it is about eating healthily. That means choosing our foods wisely, as best our budget allows, and steering clear of much of the crap that now passes as a meal at most restaurants and eateries.

There is a show on the food network called, "Diners, Drive Ins and Dives." I am always amazed at how much fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol the host of this show shoves in his already somewhat corpulent face.

The guy is a heart attack in the making, with a side of stroke for good measure.

Having been diagnosed gluten intolerant a number of years ago, I was forced to change my eating habits or continue to suffer the consequences.

The net result is I spend hours shopping because I read every label to uncover any hint of gluten. What I also have become painfully aware of is how much sugar, salt and needless fat is found in just about every prepared food lining the grocery shelves.

Here is a link to a fun list from the magazine "Men's Health." The article talks about the restaurant foods most offensive to your health. Take a gander at some of the calorie counts for some of these meals. I was just astounded.

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/21838237/

During the past five years or so, I have become aware that nutrition is an important part of both overall health and living with HIV. I know that popping a few vitamins is beneficial to a point, but those pills won't make up for a crappy diet.

Here is another list from "Men's Health," that I thought might interest some folks. It is a list of foods that are really good for you but that people ignore or don't think of eating., Some I hadn't heard of and probably couldn't find locally, but it was an interesting read.

Here is the link:

http://www.menshealth.com/cda/article.do?site=MensHealth&channel=nutrition&category=food.for.fitness&conitem=d4a15165ef624110VgnVCM20000012281eac____&cm_mmc=MSNBC-_-The%20First%20Annual%2020%20Worst%20Foods-_-Article-_-The%2010%20Best%20Foods%20You%20Aren't%20Eating

I thought having to remove gluten from my diet was one of the worst things that could have happened to me. But, once I got used to the changes I had to make, I found myself eating better, feeling better and actually starting to enjoy many of the new things I came across because of my search for gluten free foods.

I still take a multivitamin, fish oil, saw palmetto and milk thistle. But I think the change in my attitude isn't that I am taking these to replace or substitute for a proper and healthy diet, but rather to augment the benefits derived from eating more healthily.

Just my 2Ę worth.

HUGS,

Mark
« Last Edit: June 25, 2008, 08:28:14 PM by aztecan »
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline risred1

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2008, 02:08:13 PM »
I can't ever argue that good nutrition starts with the food we eat.

As you said that you were forced into this position and your awareness being increased has put you in a better position to make better choices.

The Eat this Not That! program that was sited on another helps us think about the calories, fat, sugar we are consuming with fast foods. Anything that makes us think before we chew is probably a good thing!

Best of Everything to you and thanks!
risred1 - hiv +
02/07 CD4 404 - 27% - VL 15k
10/07 CD4 484 - 31% - VL 45k
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05/09 CD4 291 - 23% - VL 115k - Started Meds - Reyataz/Truvada
06/09 CD4 394 - ?% - VL 1200 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
07/09 CD4 441 - ?% - VL 118 - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
09/09 CD4 375 - ?% - VL Undetectable - Boosted Reyataz with Norvir and Truvada
12/09 CD4 595 - ?% - VL Undetectable - VIT D 34 - Reyataz/Truvada/Norvir

Offline Jeff G

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2008, 02:42:52 PM »
Those are some great links Mark . As a diabetic that was just diagnosed in the last year I have had to make many changes for the better .

I live very near my Mom's house and she invites me to dinner often , she thinks pork is a spice and fries most every thing that will fit in a iron skillet . Mom has been offended this past month because both my step dad and I have boycotted her dinners until she makes some changes on her choices for dinner . Mom and step Dad both could lose 75 lbs .   

Offline aztecan

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2008, 08:33:23 PM »
It can be tough for some of us to really change our way of eating. Growing up, it was meat and potatoes, with maybe some green beans thrown in for good measure.

Today we know better and I am trying to do better.

Hey JG, I hope your mom comes around.

HUGS,

Mark
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline J.R.E.

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2008, 07:59:15 AM »


There is a show on the food network called, "Diners, Drive Ins and Dives." I am always amazed at how much fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol the host of this show shoves in his already somewhat corpulent face.


HUGS,

Mark



I've seen that show a few times before.  Amazing isn't it ? !! I also thought the same thing, He's a prime candidate for some serious trouble.  Also throws an extra syllable into "Paprika". Sounds like he's saying "Praperika"  :P

Ray
Current Meds ; Viramune, Epzicom, 40mg of simvastatin, 25 mg of Hydrochlorothiazide.
Metoprolol tartrate 25mg



http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=40802.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=45159.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39722.msg495621;topicseen#msg495621

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=46806.0

http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=39414.msg491701#msg491701


Diagnosed positive in 1985,.. In October of 2003, My t-cell count was 16, Viral load was over 500,000, Percentage at that time was 5%. I started on  HAART on October 24th, 2003.

 As of 8/25/14,  t-cells are at 402, Viral load <40

 Current % is at 11%

  
 62 years young.

Offline allopathicholistic

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2008, 06:10:19 PM »
Hey Mark, NYC has become the gluten-free capital of America. Come up and see us sometime!  ;D One thing I do is drink fresh juices fast so I don't taste them. the idea of prolonging a kale-apple juice doesn't appeal to me so much, but people who say "sip your juice" would cringe. Since I haven't keeled over or anything, I guess I can continue doing what I'm doing.  ;D I didn't see squash on the list, and yeah I never think of Swiss chard for, well, anything really.

Offline Florida69

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2008, 10:27:38 PM »
Mark I have lost 55lbs since January.  I have become more aware of sugars and carbs.  I also work out 3 times a week for an hour.  I get my carbs from vegetables, and eat bread and bad pasta rarely.  Lots of good protein, I only have about an inch or so more to lose before I am back to a weight that I have been most comfortable with.  It is hard to change your diet, and to eat better.  D
Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'Press On' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.
Calvin Coolidge

Offline redhotmuslbear

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2008, 11:22:59 PM »
I completely agree.

One of the best things I ever did for myself was to meet with a HIV-knowledgeable nutritionist back in 1999 several times while large swings in weight (about 30 pounds).  She talked me through the nutrition needed to maintain basic metabolic function and the additional steps I might take when working out and to help with the side effects of meds and the impacts of HIV itself.  My current eating patterns are largely modeled on what I learned then.

That said, I believe that there is always a place for fatty and starchy comfort foods in our lives.  To begin with, they do tend to boost serotonin for a sense of well-being.  Even more importantly, the often connect us to good memories.  The most important thing, though, is moderation.  Corned beef hash and eggs once a month on a Sunday morning when I know I'm going to lift 150,000 foot-pounds....no problem.  Eating eggs and cheese grits every morning with burgers for lunch and pizza for dinner.... bad.
"The real problem is not whether machines think but whether men do." - BF Skinner
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One copy of delta-32 for f*****d up CCR5 receptors, and an HLA B44+ allele for "CD8-mediated immunity"... beteer than winning Powerball, almost!

Offline allopathicholistic

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2008, 08:57:30 AM »
wrong thread sorry

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2008, 07:33:23 AM »
Hi All,

I'd like to 'revive' this thread.

I must admit that I've always had trouble with food in the past. Overeating, undereating, bingeing, Atkins-obsessive, little bit of bulimia and occasionally quite fine.

So I would be grateful for any tips you 'sage' ones could offer. I will be seeing an HIV dietician soon, but just need some advice from the forums. I'm trying really hard, but cave in to sugar cravings a bit too often. I really value your thoughts.

Sincere thanks,

Auspoz.

Offline BT65

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2008, 12:25:00 PM »
Auspoz,

I'm not sure that I'm the one to offer advice (I tend to give into sugar also).  I have learned however, since becoming diabetic years ago, that portion control plays a major role in healthy eating.  Sorry I can't offer more.
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline aztecan

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2008, 09:38:23 PM »
Hey Auspoz,

I don't know how sage my advice will be, but I have been working to control my eating habits.

I think the thing I have found helps me the most is not to try to diet, but to alter eating habits overall. This isn't a short-term type of change, but one of lifeshaping proportions.

I have dropped gluten from my diet because I am gluten intolerant. That was a toughie for a while, but after a few years, discovered I was able to make the most of my new style of eating and even try some new things I had never experienced before.

Now, I am trying to drop fats and cholesterol from my eating habits. It is proving to be a bit more challenging than I thought it would be.

I have adopted a Mediterranean diet, meaning lean meats and fish, lots of vegetables served without cream sauces or butter, whole, gluten free grains such as quinoa (which isn't Mediterranean, but who cares), and brown rice, and lots of olive oil.

So far, its been pretty successful, but I crave Mexican food and anything with cheese in it. Also, I can get by with egg beaters substitute for a while, but then I just have to have a real egg.

So, Sundays, I eat what I want. The rest of the week, I try to eat as healthily as possible.

Is it working? Don't know yet. I am supposed to get my lipids checked shortly, but haven't as yet.

Thank goodness I have never been one for sweets. I have enough trouble without that.

I think the bottom line is don't expect to change the eating habits of a lifetime in just a few weeks or months.

My gluten free lifestyle took years to become comfortable.

I rather expect it will be years before I get used to a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet.

I know I will probably become comfortable with it eventually, but right now it is a struggle at times.

So, what type changes are you wishing to make in your eating habits?

HUGS,

Mark

« Last Edit: September 25, 2008, 09:41:06 PM by aztecan »
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2008, 03:25:44 AM »
Thanks Betty and Mark. We all have our food vices; some sweet some savoury.

Mark, I know what you mean about eating habits. I have not been one for 'diets', and prefer the term 'food living habits'. It seems more sensible to me.

Well, after losing tons of weight from the anxiety at diagnosis, when I HAD to put on weight (I was disappearing fast), I then put on tons. Ah the comfort in a packet of choc chip biscuits a day. So I went from 90 kg to 78 kg then to 102 kg so far this year. (My face is showing the strain!). Now that the depression is lifting, I'm trying to eat healthier and better foods. Also I went to a gym for the first time yesterday. I say went to because you can hardly call 20 mins on a bike watching Oprah a workout. But I'll get there. It was an achievement to set foot in the place.

I suppose I just don't know what to eat. I like your suggesstion of the Mediterranean approach, and I am working out ways to develop a pattern which suits. I have lived on chicken breast and veggies before, so I know I can again.

There is a point to all of this- what do people eat for breakfast and lunch? And snacks when eating healthily? It's just so foreign atm. Dumb questions I know.

I'm looking forward to seeing my HIV dietician. That should make things clearer.

I wonder what she'll say about all the coffee?

Best of health

Auspoz

Offline BT65

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2008, 01:34:39 PM »
Auspoz, I think it's great that you're going to see an HIV dietician. 

Usually for breakfast, I eat cereal (like Raisin Bran, Cheerios) and I measure it according to the serving.  I also eat 1/2 a cup of fresh fruit.  For lunch, I eat like a Lean Cuisine meal with a yogurt (low-fat). 

Of course, this is only during the week.  On the weekends, I cook regular meals; you know, the kind mom used to make.  And like Mark, I have to have a real egg once in awhile. 

Let us know what the dietician says.  Thanks.
  Luv,
Betty
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline bear60

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2008, 03:18:02 PM »
There is a point to all of this- what do people eat for breakfast and lunch? And snacks when eating healthily? It's just so foreign atm. Dumb questions I know." quote Auspoz

Oh no...not dumb questions at all.  I have lots of practice on the chocolate chip cookies (biscuits) issue, so I have sympathy for you.
So here are some of our goals ( me and Kurt )
1. No sugary snacks ....no candy, no cakes, no cookies (bisquits).... instead....a yogurt...or fruit.
2. No fatty snacks.......no cheese, no potato chips.......instead "rice cakes" or similar with some nuts or a little peanut butter.
3. No salty snacks....no microwave popcorn.....instead we pop our own with very little  salt and no butter ( hint: canola oil is not tasty for popcorn...so we use vegetable oil for that).

Its hard to stick to ....I love chocolate and have a candy bar on occasion.  Haloween is coming...a great temptation to overindulge in sugary snacks.

I too would like to know what your dietitian said about this.

Joel
Poz Bear Type in Philadelphia

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2008, 08:26:42 PM »
Thanks Betty and Bear- Great tips.

Yep- I've discovered no fat natural youghurt and fruit. Alas I've also discovered honey with it, so will begin reducing that. And untoasted muesli, though I suspect my body doesn't like that so much.

Rice cakes, great tip. They're great with avocado, sometimes even vegemite (an Aussie staple!). I guess the low fat cottage cheese might be ok? I often wonder what's in low/no fat cheese. What else could it be???

So the list now includes bananas, apples, mandarins, strawberries, oranges. I guess stir fries are a good way to go too. Those little cans of tuna are coming inn handy, and I'm trying to boost the veggie intake.

Will keep you posted on the dietician. I am really fortunate that her services are provided by a support foundation here in Aus.

Best of health,

Auspoz.

« Last Edit: September 26, 2008, 08:29:43 PM by auspoz »

Offline water duck

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2008, 05:12:49 AM »
The art of healthful eating begins when we a healthy attitude towards food.

Loving to eat and cook it are good starting points.

How to cook , eat and stay slim depends on how you prepare your food. If you have a problem with weigh, then change how you cook . Preference given to boiling, baking where little oil is needed . Avoiding deep frying.

My answer to ' I NEED TO LOSE WEIGH ' is take yourself off dairy product . Next , stop buying all those goodies in packet form , instead buy fruits and dry fruits and nuts for those that need to snacks. Prepare carrot and celery sticks, when the need for a snack, instead of your chocolate or whatever sweet , go for these.  Look towards the bad habits that are in place and try to change them.

There again, putting in place a programme we need to consider the age , the height  of the person. What are the financial and culinary possbilities available of the person and what occupation s/he does.
So it is a good idea to see dietician, Auspoz, to work out a programme.
ofcourse, if you have questions or queries coming here give you the opportunities to have them answered. Good Luck.

Wd
« Last Edit: September 27, 2008, 07:57:48 AM by water duck »

Offline BT65

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2008, 09:20:26 AM »
My answer to ' I NEED TO LOSE WEIGH ' is take yourself off dairy product .

Of course, this isn't everyone's experience.  I know people who eat yogurt, cottage cheese (both low-fat) and drink low-fat milk and still lose weight.

Very important to talk to the dietician and work out an individual plan.
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline water duck

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2008, 11:01:21 AM »
good point, then , in that case , we go out of the context of nutrition.

We enter into the emotional zone, where stress can help put on weight or make one loss it.

Offline aztecan

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2008, 11:06:32 AM »
Hey Auspoz,

To answer your question regarding breakfast and lunch, those meals depend on my circumstances and time,

A usual breakfast would be an Eggbeaters TM omelet. I like mine with mushrooms, green chile and anything else I happen to have handy. I adore spinach in my omelets, so keeping some in the freezer helps.
I usually have one piece of toast, made with gluten-free bread I bake myself twice a week. If I have been lazy and haven't baked, I sometimes use a white corn tortilla or, if I have been to the big city, rice flour tortilla. I spread Smart Balance TM buttery spread (no cholesterol, supposed to be good for boosting good cholesterol and doesn't taste bad) along with either jam or jelly. I also have half an avocado, sans peel, sliced with a bit of kosher salt over the top.
I usually finish the meal with a bowl of fruit or a piece of fresh fruit.

As you may be able to tell, I like breakfast.

Lunch varies. If I have to eat out, I try to keep it as healthy as possible (sushi, for instance). But I often take my lunch to work. A sandwich, usually ham, tuna or turkey breast, because they are low in fat, with cholesterol and fat -free mayonnaise and mustard. I always have some fruit to go along with it, usually an apple or banana.

Sometimes I make something hot for lunch. We have a microwave, so I can reheat stuff. I make soups (I'm quite fond of turkey vegetable soup) or, this summer when summer squash was more than abundant, calabacitas, which is summer squash, green chile, whole kernel corn, a bit of onion and some pork for flavoring. Simmered, it makes a nice, healthy, low fat dish.

Dinners have been more and more Mediterranean. I eat fish at least three times a week, usually grilled, baked or poached. (I adore poached trout and salmon, especially when its fresh).
I always include at least two and often three types of vegetables and a whole grain of some sort. I like brown rice, brown and wild rice and quinoa and brown rice combos.

Dessert is either some sort of fruit or, occasionally, a fruit bar or a fudge bar (OK, so I'm not perfect.)

When its not fish, it is usually boneless, skinless chicken breast. Sometimes turkey breast medallions are available too.

I also add a some very lean pork once a week or so, just for variety's sake.

So, that's what I do.

Let me know what your dietitian says. I am interested in what type of diet he/she guides you to.

Hey Water Duck,

I do sometimes include some dairy in my diet, specifically yogurt or cottage cheese. I know in Asia dairy products are not eaten as much as here in the states. But I was advised by my doc, to make sure to include some yogurt in the diet for probiotic benefits.

HUGS,

Mark
"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2008, 07:48:35 PM »
Thanks so much Mark. I really appreciate all that. It sounds like a totally wonderful menu at your place. I may come and visit!

I will certainly share my dietician experience with all. I know it will be an individual program, but it will be interesting to share.

Auspoz

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2008, 11:43:23 PM »
Hi. Have just returned and writing this will hopefully serve to share as well as clarify in my mind what the dietician suggested.

I need to work at getting my cholesterol down, and so have been recommended to take fish oil tablets and use a particular margarine, at one spoonful a day.

I think the key piece of information was to eat at regular intervals, and keep the body motor going. My habits have been poor for so long that it was a simple yet sensible suggestion- eat food for starters!

As for the eating plan, it seems my current choices have been quite appropriate.

Breakfast of cereal, no fat natural yoghurt, honey (reduce the amount), a piece of fruit and V8 juice. Every once and a while maybe scrambled eggs, mushrooms and multi grain toast.

For mid morning, a snack of rice cakes with low fat cottage cheese, or avocado and maybe some fruit.

Lunch could be so much, so long as it is low fat, contains some vegetables and protein. I will go for either a healthy chicken and salad roll with avocado rather than butter, or a salad with tuna in springwater. Or a pre-prepared chicken breast with vegetables in the micowave.

Mid afternoon, a snack of yoghurt and a piece of fruit, or wheat crackers, rice cakes and some low fat spread.

For dinner, I'm going to try the chicken/fish/lean meat and vegetables as much as possible, with V8 juice. Trying to incorporate 5 serves of veggies will be a challenge.

I was recommended basmati or brown rather than white rice. Of coursze high fibre, low carb breads, and small amounts of nuts.

I mentioned the Body for Life program and how I'd had success with it in the past, but have 'let myself go'. She actually said that wasn't a bad idea, and that it seemed I was well prepared to make healthy choices if the program didn't look like it was doing the right stuff for me.

So I will be checking in with her in a month to see how my eating is going.

My BMI is 26, and I need to reduce that somewhat. I know that exercise is the thing that will help me most, and I hope to become a body freak. Hell, I might get a swimmers build after all.

I may add more if I think of other things, but just wanted to let you know how it went. In a nutshell, I don't think I learned that much, but it will be a process and change as my needs do.

Oh and I have to replace some coffees with water. I have to aim for 4 coffees a day. Ugh. We'll see how that goes.

Best of health,

Auspoz.


Offline Funkengruven

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2008, 12:03:16 PM »
Auspoz,

Glad to hear the visit to the nutritionist went well.  Regarding your coffee addiction, I run a number of marathons and have to reduce the amount of coffee I drink beforehand.  I found switching half my coffee intake to black tea in the morning helps me a lot with the caffeine withdrawl.  After a couple weeks I find myself completely off coffee, though lord knows after the race is over that sweet java siren calls me back.  Anyways, not sure if you are a tea drinker, but it may help you cut out a few cups without making you cranky from lack of caffeine

Offline BT65

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2008, 04:05:18 PM »
Aus, thanks for letting us know how it went with the nutritionist.  You inspired me to make an appointment with the diabetes educator in this area, who I will be seeing this Thursday.  I've seen her before and she talked to me about a diabetic diet; of course, I've thrown out everything she gave me. :-\   

Good luck cutting back on the coffee.  I used to drink a ton of diet Pepsi, then gradually cut back and replaced it with water mostly (though I still enjoy a can a day, besides morning coffee).  Let us know how you're doing.
 Luv,
Betty
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2008, 07:00:03 PM »
Thanks Funkengruven (that is a very cool name).

Yeah teas are good by me, and I might just try that. It's these handy little suggestions that I'm looking for. Ta.

Betty, good luck with your visit on Thursday. I hope it goes well for you. And may I say I feel touched that you said I inspired you. That really means a lot to me. :) Let us know how it goes.

I hope this thread continues, and I do apologise to Mark for like totally hijacking it. But I guess if I'm asking about healthy eating, other people must have questions and ideas about it too.

Best of health

Auspoz.

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2008, 09:16:43 PM »
Hello,

Just wondering BT if you found anything interesting at your visit to the dietician?

Cheers,

Auspoz.

Offline BT65

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2008, 08:44:31 AM »
Hey Auspoz,

Actually I went to see a diabetes educator.  Since my bloodwork (A1C, a marker in the blood concerning diabetes) was so good, we talked about portion control (which I have a problem with), and the kinds of foods to eat that have the least amount of fat. 

She mentioned the importance of eating fish, which I absolutely detest (other than the kind from Long John Silver's w/ tartar sauce).  She told me that kind doesn't count.  I know talapia doesn't have the usual "fishy" flavor when cooked right, but it still does have a slight horrid flavor, which I just can't stomach.  When my sister from AZ was up here, she made a really good salmon fillet; but, who can afford that all the time?  If you have a good recipe that gets rid of that fishy flavor (and is cheap), pm me.
  Luv,
Betty
I've never killed anyone, but I frequently get satisfaction reading the obituary notices.-Clarence Darrow

Offline heartforyou

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2008, 05:11:01 AM »
Quote
So, Sundays, I eat what I want. The rest of the week, I try to eat as healthily as possible.
/quote]

That is,indeed a very healthy  attitude Markie.

As an ex gym owner these are my golden rules :

- read the labels on what you by. It makes you more aware of the fats and sugars and  awareness is the seed for change.
- eat at least five times a day , small to regular portions and never leave more then 2 hours between them
- drink lots and lots of water and stay clear of soft drinks
- have nuts and seeds handy for snacking
- use and try out different spices to alter the taste of the same vegetable
- substitute butter by lots of virgin olive oil
- and of course, physical exercise is a MUST, at least three times a week. Start by walking up the stairs instead of taking the elevator e.g.

I by my vegetables when they are in season and priced low and make soups or stews with them or mix them with mashed potatoes.

From what i read, Aussiepoz, you have taken the most important step already : making yourself aware that your present eating style is not benefitting you at all.

Good luck and good health to you all.

Hermie

Diagnosed in 1987 and still kicking
Viread, Kivexa (Epzicom),Viramune once daily

Happiness is the freedom of breathing fresh air every day.

Offline auspoz

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2008, 07:11:25 AM »
Hi Hermie,

Thanks for sharing your tips. It sometimes seems so simple yet so hard too.

I have begun exercising (very hard as a beginner) and I hope to get better. The psychological benefits willl be as profound as the physical ones for me. And yes, fruits, veggies, no fat yoghurt and lean meat have become my companions. Oh and loads of water.

Fortunately having been quirky all my life, noone is questioning my sudden transformation to health freak.

I'm trying new foods too. Anyone got any tips on polenta? Is it any good for you? LOL. As I said, I'm pretty hopeless at it all.

Thanks all,

Auspoz.

Seadickrun

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #29 on: November 28, 2008, 05:40:22 AM »
My two cents worth -

Protein - the only thing my doctors have told me regarding nutrition was to shoot for 145 grams of protein per day.  I started making protein shakes at home (adding Brewers Yeast along with protein powder) and found I could add 50 grams of protein per day without much effort. 

Quinoa - a dietitian suggested I try this grain because it is a complete protein, organic, etc. and tastes great.  You prepare it exactly the same way as white rice (done in 20 minutes) and I have seen it served at vegan events and everyone thought it was brown rice.  It has a nuttier taste and cooks in half the time as brown rice. 

Laurel's Kitchen - a great vegetarian cookbook that every home should have.  The recipes taste great, there is lots of technical info included, and its a great way to add diversity to the diet.  The emphasis is on whole foods, not processed products.  Back in the day, I used to make my own yogurt, mayonnaise, and bread.

MSG, partially-hydrogenated oils, and other poisons - Its pretty shocking how many foods have MSG in them yet we give Chinese restaurants a hard time if they use it:)  Canned soups, crackers, chips, sauces, etc., are loaded with the stuff.  I avoid partially-hydrogenated oils.  I use butter instead of margarine (both have 16 grams of fat per tablespoon), I get the Adams peanut butter or the grind-your-own at the co-op, and I wouldn't allow Miracle Whip in my home.  Paul and Nel Newman make great products that don't contain crap - try the Newman-O's if you like Oreos but want to avoid the partially-hydrogenated oils.  God, they are good.  I read the label on everything and the old rule was, if I didn't know what it was, I wouldn't put it in my body.  After working in a chemistry lab,  I had to revise that rule:))

exercise - I have a set of weights at home, a Swiss ball, and a jump rope.  I find it a lot easier to workout at home than to go to a crowded gym and feel self conscious.  I also walk close to two hours everyday (see the pic of my neighborhood - I live on top of that hill).  I don't own a car and ever since I sold the thing, I noticed that I can eat most anything I want and keep thin (6'3", 180lbs, 32" waist).  Walking is low impact and with an iPod, you can even "read" a book while walking to and fro.  I've spent many years structuring my life so that I can walk everywhere I need to go - doctor's office, grocery, my therapist, my last two jobs, movies, plays, symphony, my friend's, the courthouse, dmv, etc.  I did the same thing living in San Francisco, and when I lived in LA, it was all about my bicycle/public transportation. 

meals - portion size and frequency - I eat off of a salad plate.  When the plate is empty, I wait about 15 minutes and if I'm still hungry, I get another salad plate of food.  I also eat about six meals a day, constantly grazing.  My body can't do all of the chemical reactions it needs to do if I just dump food in two or three times a day.  Slow and steady wins the reward.  I never skip dessert but I always make sure I eat other foods first. That way, I'm already pretty full before I start in on that cake and I find I eat half of what I would normally eat of any given sinful item. 

breakfast, lunch, and dinner - breakfast is usually cooked 10-grain cereal with a handful of trail mix thrown on top (nuts, seeds, and coconut, no chocolate chips), coffee, toast, maybe some eggs.  Lunch is usually what ever is left over from last night (just have to reheat it) and there is usually a peanut butter/banana sandwhich somewhere in between or a protein shake.  Dinner is either broiled meat, broiled fish, or stir fry and steamed vegetables.  Broiling and steaming are quick and don't require fat.  I'll probably munch some raw vegetables or fruit while watching tv and before going to bed, I usually eat a second helping of dinner or a salad followed by dessert (tonight its pears/apples baked with brown sugar, butter, and rolled oats)



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Offline jayjax

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2008, 10:04:53 AM »
Hey Seadickrun,

Enjoyed your post on your healthy living and exercise.  Keep up the posts ! You are inspiring to us all !

Thanks,
jayjax
08 Oct 08:  Diagnosed
18 Oct 08:  1st Lab Work: CD4 - 268, VL 7,000
18 Nov 08:  Started Atripla
28 Jan 09:   CD4 - 195, VL 70
05 May 09:  CD4 - 201, VL = Undetectable
16 Aug 09: CD4 - 235, VL = Undetectable
30 Nov 09 CD4 - 300, VL = Undetectable
30 Mar 10 CD4 - 305, VL = Undetectable
27 Jul 10 CD4 -  301, VL = 100
13 Aug 10 -- Switched to Truvada/Reyataz/Norvir
30 Sep 10 --  CD4 598, VL = Undetectable

Offline aztecan

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2008, 11:18:48 AM »
Hey Seadickrun,

Some nice suggestions. I like quinoa, except as a hot cereal (ugh!)

I usually steer clear of most vegetarian cookbooks, recipes or restaurants, because most of those foods are contaminated with gluten-containing products such as wheat flour. That's a no-no for us celiacs.

Since I am also trying to watch my fat/cholesterol intake, as evidenced by the three cholesterol meds or supplements I take, I hear you on steaming. I adore steamed or poached fish.

I also try to steer toward whole foods rather than processed foods. For one, it is much easier to steer clear of any gluten contamination. It also just seems to make sense to avoid putting all those additives into the ol bod if I can.

I think we do enough of that via our meds.  ;)

I have been using Smart Balance spread rather than butter, however. But, the cost of it is just about the same as butter and I really don't use that/i] much. We'll see. I do like butter so much better.

One thing that has come out of this gluten free diet is the use of bean flours. They make a hearty bread and are really pretty good for other things such as cakes and pie crusts.  Just an FYI.

HUGS,

Mark

"May your life preach more loudly than your lips."
~ William Ellery Channing (Unitarian Minister)

Offline Miss Philicia

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #32 on: November 30, 2008, 11:25:28 AM »
I've spent many years structuring my life so that I can walk everywhere I need to go - doctor's office, grocery, my therapist, my last two jobs, movies, plays, symphony, my friend's, the courthouse, dmv, etc.  I did the same thing living in San Francisco, and when I lived in LA, it was all about my bicycle/public transportation. 

Me too -- I've not owned a car for 20 years.  I get a work out just grocery shopping.  I carry 4-5 grocery bags about 5 blocks and then up 4 flights of stairs.
"Iíve slept with enough men to know that Iím not gay"

Seadickrun

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Re: The art of healthful eating
« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2008, 09:37:03 AM »
Quinoa as a hot cereal needs fruit added, perhaps some dried cherries and figs or as the gal at the co-op suggested, oranges and honey.  I prefer 10-grain for breakfast and whole wheat pancakes so I haven't tried it in the morning.  The only allergy I have is to Sustiva:)) so I'm lucky with foods.

Laurel's Kitchen has something for everyone and every recipe has been run past nutritionists at UC Berkely.  The back of the book is technical stuff designed to help vegetarians properly combine nutrients.  I got the book as a gift when I started a vegetarian diet back in '83.  I was eating nothing but cheese sandwiches and peanut butter and jelly and my roommate's brother came over one day and handed me a copy for my own good.  I prefer the old version of the book from the '70's before Laurel and her friends got even more health conscious and started limiting fats, etc.  They took out my favorite biscuit recipe because they thought they were too rich.  None of the soups have wheat added and my favorites are the Black Bean soup and the Tomato-Corn soup.  Next time you are in a bookstore, thumb through a copy and see if anything catches your eye.  The book also has a recipe for freezing tofu, then thawing it back out (changes the consistency) and then marinating in a teriyaki sauce.  Next, you broil the tofu slab and make sandwhiches out of it.  Closest thing to meat a vegetarian has ever presented to me.  Roasted carrots glazed with orange juice are pretty good too.  I'm real lucky that when I was in high school, I hung out with older, Deadhead hippies who taught me some good ways to eat (and they had the most righteous acid:)).

 


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