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Author Topic: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?  (Read 2581 times)

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Offline John2038

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Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« on: October 16, 2007, 04:13:34 PM »
Just found this article interesting.

http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/news/NIAIDdiscoveryNews/earlyTreatmentHIV.htm

Abstract

The persistence of latently infected resting CD4+ T cells has been clearly demonstrated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)ndashinfected individuals receiving effective antiviral therapy. However, estimates of the half-life of this viral reservoir have been quite divergent. We demonstrate clear evidence for decay of this HIV reservoir in patients who initiated antiviral therapy early in infection. The half-life of this latent viral reservoir was estimated to be 4.6 months.
It is projected that it will take up to 7.7 years of continuous therapy to completely eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells in infected individuals who initiate antiviral therapy early in HIV infection.

Source:
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JID/journal/issues/v195n12/37645/37645.html

More:
http://www.natap.org/2007/HIV/050307_07.htm

And:
http://www.aidsportugal.com/article.php?sid=7603
« Last Edit: October 16, 2007, 05:06:55 PM by John2038 »

Offline whizzer

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Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2007, 10:08:38 PM »
If you're REALLY interested, Dr. Margolis has a study regarding this currently recruiting.

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00312546?order=10

The date of the above reference is April 2006, but the study is still open and recruiting.

Offline SASA39

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Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2007, 08:42:17 PM »
It is projected that it will take up to 7.7 years of continuous therapy to completely eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells in infected individuals who initiate antiviral therapy early in HIV infection.



First : who does HAART in early stages ? Almost no one .
Second : What about late starters .What is a half life period for them?
Any answer?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2007, 08:46:20 PM by SASA39 »
Oct.     `06.  CD4=58  ?    %       VL not perform. ?!?
25.Dec.`06.         203       14        VL= 0
29.May.`07.    broken device        VL=1363
20.June`07     broken device        VL=0
25.Dec `07  CD4=582                  VL=70
14.May `08  CD4=448
29.July `08                                  VL=0
26.Nov `08  CD4=674                    VL=179
16.Mar `09  CD4=554                    VL=0
19.Jan`10 CD4=715               
03.Mar`10                                    VL=0
24.Aug`10 CD4=524                     VL=0
04.Dec`10 CD4=626                     VL=0
15.Sep`11                                   VL=93
17.Nov`11                                   VL=0
05/26 .Jul`12 CD4=713                 VL=0
28.Nov`12 CD4=916                     VL=0
09.May`13                                 VL=0

Offline HIVworker

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Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2007, 11:36:38 PM »
Studies into HIV latency are in their infancy. The reason that these people were selected for the study is because they have been on antiretroviral therapy the longest and therefore have controlled their virus right from the beginning. It's sort of the best case for having hit the virus early in infection. For the record, the half-life of the latent pool is still under discussion. At a recent meeting there was great debate on how long it really was - with the authors of both studies not agreeing. You raise some good questions - some of which will be answered by new studies on HIV latency. It has to be tackled if there is any hope of a cure...as are accurate methods of monitoring the size of the latent pool.

R
NB. Any advice about HIV is given in addition to your own medical advice and not intended to replace it. You should never make clinical decisions based on what anyone says on the internet but rather check with your ID doctor first. Discussions from the internet are just that - Discussions. They may give you food for thought, but they should not direct you to do anything but fuel discussion.

Offline ashton

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Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 12:35:49 AM »
I agree with HIVworker; it's way too early to know much.  You could go to http://www.natap.org/ and look for a Conference Report entitled "A band of optimists considers the road towards a distant goal: eradication; Report from HIV Eradication Conference", 3rd Intl Workshop on HIV Persistence during Therapy, West Indies, St Maartin.  This covers some of the latest thinking on the topic.


Offline HIVworker

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  • HIV researcher
Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2007, 01:02:00 AM »
Aye, I know about that meeting.
NB. Any advice about HIV is given in addition to your own medical advice and not intended to replace it. You should never make clinical decisions based on what anyone says on the internet but rather check with your ID doctor first. Discussions from the internet are just that - Discussions. They may give you food for thought, but they should not direct you to do anything but fuel discussion.

Offline bimazek

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Re: Eliminate latently infected resting CD4+ T cells ?
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2008, 06:58:09 PM »

not sure how new this article is but yes of course there is lowering of the latent infection over time, the issue is that the immune system is not a linear system, what is called a linear system in mathematics, it is not just the sum of its parts, it does not behave in a completely easily predictable way

it is a nonlinear system -- In a nonlinear system the components are interactive, interdependent, and exhibit feedback effects. 
Like the weather -- yes the hidden reserviours decay over time on HAART, that is why HAART is so so important, like my friend who is 62 yrs old and been on meds for 6 years and now off meds for 8 months, he is still undetectable, but he has had a health event, one node in his neck has swollen up about size of a acorn or half a thumb, the point is this is why they dont take many off of haart because of these unpredictable little, and sometimes big problems that arise when the virus re animates.






Nonlinear system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In mathematics, a nonlinear system is a system which is not linear i.e. a system which does not satisfy the superposition principle. Generally, nonlinear problems are difficult (if possible) to solve and are much less understandable than linear problems. Even if not exactly solvable, the outcome of a linear problem is rather predictable, while the outcome of a nonlinear is inherently not.  Nonlinear problems are of interest to physicists and mathematicians because most physical systems are inherently nonlinear in nature. Physical examples of linear systems are not very common. Nonlinear equations are difficult to solve and give rise to interesting phenomena such as chaos. The weather is famously nonlinear, where simple changes in one part of the system produce complex effects throughout....
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonlinearity

nonlinear system
In a nonlinear system the components are interactive, interdependent, and exhibit feedback effects. Related category SYSTEMS THEORY Also on this site: ...
www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/N/nonlinear_system.html -

 


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